Question RX 580 undervolting

Sep 28, 2020
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My rx 580 is getting too hot and i read online about undervolting the card. However i have no idea about any of this stuff i don’t know what it means at all. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.
 

tennis2

Honorable
What brand and model do you have? Is it a 4GB or 8GB card?

What case do you have? What size and quantity of fans do you have? Where is each fan located and which direction (intake/exhaust) is each fan blowing?

Turn on your PC, then RESTART (not shut down, restart)
Go into AMD Settings
click the performance tab
click the tuning sub-tab
GPU tuning - enable
Advanced control - enable - List the 7 frequencies this exposes and I'll give you corresponding voltages to enter
Voltage - Manual - List the corresponding voltages that show up, so we have a reference point.
VRAM tuning - enable
Advanced control - enable
VRAM voltage - manual
Click "apply changes" at the top right

For good measure, restart your PC after all this, then go back into the tuning tab and verify all the frequencies & voltages are the same as the ones you initially wrote. Then report them here.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: EthanPalmzz
Sep 28, 2020
5
0
10
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What brand and model do you have? Is it a 4GB or 8GB card?

What case do you have? What size and quantity of fans do you have? Where is each fan located and which direction (intake/exhaust) is each fan blowing?

Turn on your PC, then RESTART (not shut down, restart)
Go into AMD Settings
click the performance tab
click the tuning sub-tab
GPU tuning - enable
Advanced control - enable - List the 7 frequencies this exposes and I'll give you corresponding voltages to enter
Voltage - Manual - List the corresponding voltages that show up, so we have a reference point.
VRAM tuning - enable
Advanced control - enable
VRAM voltage - manual
Click "apply changes" at the top right

For good measure, restart your PC after all this, then go back into the tuning tab and verify all the frequencies & voltages are the same as the ones you initially wrote. Then report them here.
Thanks for the reply. I have the sapphire pulse RX 580 8gb card. Honestly, I couldn't tell u what the case is called, its a cheap Antec one.

I've done exactly as u said and I will list the above here now;
Clock speed: 300MHz
Freq
State 0 : 300MHz
State 1 : 600Mhz
State 2: 900MHz
State 3: 1145MHz
State 4: 1215MHz
State 5: 1257MHz
State 6: 1300MHz
State 7: 1366MHz
Voltage
750
769
862
1068
1150
1200
1150
1150

VRAM TUNING
Clock 300MHz
Freq
State 0: 1750MHz
STate 1: 1750MHz
State 2: 2000MHz
Vram Voltage
750
800
950
 

tennis2

Honorable
Some preliminary info:
  • The VRAM receives the same voltage as the core gets (which is determined in the core frequency/voltage table. The VRAM voltage settings are simply a lower limit to the card voltage in order to retain VRAM stability. Much like the core, VRAM has a minimum stable voltage per MHz. Generally you're looking at around....900-930mV required for 2000MHz VRAM, but obviously the core frequency table has states that require less than that. Any core voltage settings (except for State 0) that require less voltage than that are mostly only applicable if you're not running your VRAM at 2000MHz.
  • It's unlikely that you'll see 1750MHz VRAM speed. Similarly to the 2000MHz setting though, there will be a corresponding minimum stable voltage required for 1750MHz. I was going to test 1750MHz VRAM voltage on my card, but never got around to it.
  • All cards are different, require different voltages to maintain stability at various frequencies, and have different maximum stable frequencies (although you'll probably hit a voltage limit before you reach your frequency limit on AMD Polaris). To test, use your favorite stress testing tool. I use FurMark for rough testing. I've used OCCT, which is CERTAINLY the most stressful test I've come across, but it spikes power usage so much, that you won't be able to test higher frequencies due to power limits. I use Folding@Home for final stability tests.
    • When you do a stability test (and aren't getting power or temp throttling) you'll notice the card just runs at the State 7 frequency the whole time. To test lower frequencies (say State 3 = 1145MHz) you'll need to set the frequencies of all greater States to that same frequency (ie States 4-7 would also be set to 1145MHz)
  • Power limit % - You shouldn't need this to hit your 1366MHz with manual voltage tuning, but if you notice that the card isn't hitting 1366MHz consistently, try increasing the power limit. This will come into play if/when you push beyond 1400MHz potentially.
Try this:
300MHz / 750mV
600MHz / 800mV (could leave this at stock)
900MHz / 860mV
1145MHz / 925mV
1215MHz / 965mV
1255MHz / 1000mV
1300MHz / 1040mV
1366MHz / 1100mV

Try VRAM voltage at 925mV - This way, states 3-7 will all have dynamic voltage, but states 1&2 will still get 925MHz unless the VRAM frequency somehow miraculously dips into the 1750MHz bin while the card isn't at State 0 (idle) frequency.
 
Sep 28, 2020
5
0
10
0
Some preliminary info:
  • The VRAM receives the same voltage as the core gets (which is determined in the core frequency/voltage table. The VRAM voltage settings are simply a lower limit to the card voltage in order to retain VRAM stability. Much like the core, VRAM has a minimum stable voltage per MHz. Generally you're looking at around....900-930mV required for 2000MHz VRAM, but obviously the core frequency table has states that require less than that. Any core voltage settings (except for State 0) that require less voltage than that are mostly only applicable if you're not running your VRAM at 2000MHz.
  • It's unlikely that you'll see 1750MHz VRAM speed. Similarly to the 2000MHz setting though, there will be a corresponding minimum stable voltage required for 1750MHz. I was going to test 1750MHz VRAM voltage on my card, but never got around to it.
  • All cards are different, require different voltages to maintain stability at various frequencies, and have different maximum stable frequencies (although you'll probably hit a voltage limit before you reach your frequency limit on AMD Polaris). To test, use your favorite stress testing tool. I use FurMark for rough testing. I've used OCCT, which is CERTAINLY the most stressful test I've come across, but it spikes power usage so much, that you won't be able to test higher frequencies due to power limits. I use Folding@Home for final stability tests.
    • When you do a stability test (and aren't getting power or temp throttling) you'll notice the card just runs at the State 7 frequency the whole time. To test lower frequencies (say State 3 = 1145MHz) you'll need to set the frequencies of all greater States to that same frequency (ie States 4-7 would also be set to 1145MHz)
  • Power limit % - You shouldn't need this to hit your 1366MHz with manual voltage tuning, but if you notice that the card isn't hitting 1366MHz consistently, try increasing the power limit. This will come into play if/when you push beyond 1400MHz potentially.
Try this:
300MHz / 750mV
600MHz / 800mV (could leave this at stock)
900MHz / 860mV
1145MHz / 925mV
1215MHz / 965mV
1255MHz / 1000mV
1300MHz / 1040mV
1366MHz / 1100mV

Try VRAM voltage at 925mV - This way, states 3-7 will all have dynamic voltage, but states 1&2 will still get 925MHz unless the VRAM frequency somehow miraculously dips into the 1750MHz bin while the card isn't at State 0 (idle) frequency.
Yes okay i’ll try all of them then i’ll use Furmark. Thanks so much for the help.

One thing...when u say at the end to try vram voltage at 925mV, which one because there’s 3 to choose from: 750, 800 and 950.
 
Sep 28, 2020
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2000MHz / 925mV on VRAM (State 2)
Ok so i used furmark and ran the stress test.
I got a max temp of 80°
Fan speed 106.2%/2421.0 RPM
GPU power:
Power limit: 100%TDP
Power Min: 70% TDP
Power max: 130% TDP
Clock speeds:
core: 1366Mhz
FP32 perf 6.3 TFLOPS
Mem 2000MHz
Current clock speeds:
Core: 1263.6MHz
FP32 perf 5.8 TFLOPS
mem 2000.0MHz
VDDC 1.000V
Core usage 100.0%

avg 122fps
min 121
max 124

No idea what most of this means but just gave u the info that seemed useful. wether this is good, I don't know. My pc didn't crash and no blue screens so I'm guessing that means its stable at what it is maybe?? I ran the stress test for 10mins, though I probably should've left it for around 20mins maybe. Just the loudness of the fans always makes me worry. i hope I have gave u the right info here.
 

tennis2

Honorable
Generally GPUs will target 73-75C by varying the fan speed. 80C isn't harmful though.

What's your GPU fan rpms?
How do these results compare to "stock/auto"

What is your case & case fan setup? Does the GPU run significantly cooler (and/or quieter) if you run the test with the side panel removed from the case?

I got a SIGNIFICANT improvement to temps when I re-applied thermal paste to my MSI RX480 Gaming X. Somewhere around 10C less temp and 1000rpm less fans. My RX480 generally runs at 73-75C with 1100rpm fans. Inaudible.
 
Sep 28, 2020
5
0
10
0
Generally GPUs will target 73-75C by varying the fan speed. 80C isn't harmful though.

What's your GPU fan rpms?
How do these results compare to "stock/auto"

What is your case & case fan setup? Does the GPU run significantly cooler (and/or quieter) if you run the test with the side panel removed from the case?

I got a SIGNIFICANT improvement to temps when I re-applied thermal paste to my MSI RX480 Gaming X. Somewhere around 10C less temp and 1000rpm less fans. My RX480 generally runs at 73-75C with 1100rpm fans. Inaudible.
After doing the test again on stock, ngl the pc seemed a lot quiter running at 80C on stock settings. Maybe reapplying thermal paste is something I need to look into.
 

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