[SOLVED] RX580 not compatible with Gigabyte B360 HD3?? What am I missing?

Sep 13, 2019
4
0
10
0
Hi guys, so here is my predicament. I've helped a friend by speccing out some hardware within their budget. The CPU is an I5, The motherboard is the Gigabyte B360 HD3, The Video card is an RX580 and PSU is 750w 80+ Bronze.

The problem is, the motherboard indicator light indicates a problem with "video" when the RX580 is installed. The monitor displays nothing and the PC won't post with the card installed. I have tried to troubleshoot this multiple ways, including booting in to bios using intel graphics and setting intel graphics to off (so only PCIE graphics are used). This did not work. I've tried the card in my own PC (nvidia) and it works fine. I've even tried an entirely different, known good RX580 in the same system and it experiences the same issue. (i've tried both an MSI RX580 (the one I specced for her) and a Sapphire branded RX580. Both experience the same issue, no video output, no post.

Now this system was built from the ground up all new components. The wierd thing is, it works with my old GTX970 installed. Boots fine. I've been loaning her this card so she is not sitting with an overpriced paperweight, but I'm really stumped as to what could be causing this.
It shouldn't be power delivery for the following reasons: the PSU is more than sufficient. The power cables for the video card (which are integrated, IE: non-modular connector on semi-modular PSU) work with the GTX970 card, which has higher power draw and requires the 6 and 8 pin as opposed to the RX580s just 8 pin requirement.

I've of course tried re-seating the video cards (both of them, multiple times) and ensured the power connectors are properly inserted. Both RX580 video cards non-functional in her system work fine when installed in mine. EDIT: should also mention, BIOS has of course, been updated.

Please help, as I feel bad and responsible as the hardware was purchased at my suggestion.

MB: https://www.amazon.ca/GIGABYTE-B360-HD3-LGA1151-Motherboard/dp/B07BQB1CMX/ref=sr_1_7?crid=1GWY059VWB8LV&keywords=lga+1151+motherboard&qid=1568388979&sprefix=lga1151,aps,234&sr=8-7

Graphics card 1: https://www.amazon.ca/RX-580-ARMOR-8G-OC/dp/B06XZQMMHJ/ref=sr_1_3?keywords=RX580&qid=1568389537&sr=8-3

Graphics card 2: https://www.amazon.ca/Sapphire-11265-05-20G-Backplate-Graphics-Graphic/dp/B06ZZ6FMF8/ref=sr_1_1?keywords=RX580&qid=1568389537&sr=8-1

I should note, there are no post error codes played through internal speaker. The only thing is the "video" indicator light on the mobo stays solid, however during a typical functioning boot sequence the lights would flash as they test the systems then remain off.
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, that certainly SHOULD be sufficient, even though it's a somewhat crappy model compared to other EVGA power supplies. Much like the older B1, N1 and W1 units.

Still, with 750w, you should at least be able to supply the 550w the system might need at most without crumpling.

Have you checked for a newer BIOS version for the motherboard? If not, that would be a good idea.

Since the BIOS has been updated as you say, IF it is the latest version and not just a version newer than the original one, I would try doing a hard reset of the BIOS, WITH the RX 580, not the GTX 970, installed before you power back on.


Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Well, that certainly SHOULD be sufficient, even though it's a somewhat crappy model compared to other EVGA power supplies. Much like the older B1, N1 and W1 units.

Still, with 750w, you should at least be able to supply the 550w the system might need at most without crumpling.

Have you checked for a newer BIOS version for the motherboard? If not, that would be a good idea.

Since the BIOS has been updated as you say, IF it is the latest version and not just a version newer than the original one, I would try doing a hard reset of the BIOS, WITH the RX 580, not the GTX 970, installed before you power back on.


Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.
 
Sep 13, 2019
4
0
10
0
Well, that certainly SHOULD be sufficient, even though it's a somewhat crappy model compared to other EVGA power supplies. Much like the older B1, N1 and W1 units.
Well, the bios version is 1 older than the "newest" version. It is dated 03/09/2019. The reason I did not go with the newest version is it hobbles some performance due to intel's security BS and their workarounds. However, I WILL try what you've suggested and let you know how it turns out. Thanks for the detailed response. :)

Bios version F13 is what is installed. https://www.gigabyte.com/ca/Motherboard/B360-HD3-rev-10/support#support-dl-bios
 
Sep 13, 2019
4
0
10
0
F13 should be sufficient for the purpose of the graphics card compatibility. No need to update the BIOS just for that.
Welp, you were right. It's funny, because I knew resetting the CMOS was a thing... I've just built lots of computers over the years and have never had to do that. I just assumed that it was some wierd incompatibility thing? Anyhow, thanks for the response and the help. Problem solved.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yaaaaaayyyy. Cool man. I figured, but you never know. There is no one thing that works for every situation, but a CMOS rest is a VERY GOOD thing to try every time you install a new piece of hardware and something doesn't want to work OR just seems "off". Glad it worked man. Best of luck.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY