Question Ryzen 3 2200g APU good for General purpose

Feb 13, 2019
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I'm looking for very low end build with APU.
I'll be using 8GB RAM with it.

Will be used for Lightroom , DotA 2,CS : GO at high setting or mixed with medium to high,Watching YouTube and Movies at 1080p high resolution.

Also want to know if it is capable to do editing videos which are of 1080p
 
Feb 13, 2019
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So long as your expectations aren't too high, sure, it could work for any of that stuff. You'd be a lot better off with one of the APUs from the Ryzen 3000 series though, as those have a much improved IPC and single core performance.
U mean the 3200g over 2200g ?

3200g is little bit on higher price though.

Can u also suggest best low end motherboard? A320 I suppose.
 

Third-Eye

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I'm looking for very low end build with APU.
I'll be using 8GB RAM with it.

Will be used for Lightroom , DotA 2,CS : GO at high setting or mixed with medium to high,Watching YouTube and Movies at 1080p high resolution.

Also want to know if it is capable to do editing videos which are of 1080p
Make sure to buy the fastest ram you can afford with the best timings (lower is better) in a 2x4GB kit. DDR4 3600 CL16 would be close to ideal on an Ryzen 3 2200g/3200g. Using 2x4GB for dual channel mode can sometimes double your fps in some games or increase fps by up 25%.

Don't expect to get more than 60fps in most new games on low settings. Dota 2 can run at up to 100FPS with low settings at 1080p on the 2200g.
 
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Feb 13, 2019
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Make sure to buy the fastest ram you can afford with the best timings (lower is better) in a 2x4GB kit. DDR4 3600 CL16 would be close to ideal on an Ryzen 3 2200g/3200g. Using 2x4GB for dual channel mode can sometimes double your fps in some games or increase fps by up 35%.

Don't expect to get more than 60fps in most new games on low settings. Dota 2 can run at up to 100FPS with low settings at 1080p on the 2200g.
I'm thinking of 1x8GB 3000Mhz now. And later 1 more 8GB incase if 16GB RAM helps for video editing.
3200 and above are hard to get here in my place even if they do ,they will be at high price.
I'm trying to build as low as possible.

DotA 2 at low settings looks terrible.
As long as it won't stutter during game fights then I'm ok with mid to high settings.
 

Third-Eye

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I'm thinking of 1x8GB 3000Mhz now. And later 1 more 8GB incase if 16GB RAM helps for video editing.
3200 and above are hard to get here in my place even if they do ,they will be at high price.
I'm trying to build as low as possible.

DotA 2 at low settings looks terrible.
As long as it won't stutter during game fights then I'm ok with mid to high settings.
You are better off saving and getting a 2x8GB kit when you buy your hardware if you think you will be using your system for video editing, because you really want to have at least 16GB for 1080p editing. If you don't plan on editing videos when you first buy the hardware, get a motherboard with 4 slots and a 2x4GB kit and buy a second 2x4GB kit later. DDR4 3000 or 3200 would be good if they fit in your budget.
 
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You are better off saving and getting a 2x8GB kit when you buy your hardware if you think you will be using your system for video editing, because you really want to have at least 16GB for 1080p editing. If you don't plan on editing videos when you first buy the hardware, get a motherboard with 4 slots and a 2x4GB kit and buy a second 2x4GB kit later. DDR4 3000 or 3200 would be good if they fit in your budget.
Alright!

Any a320m motherboard suggestion ?
 

Third-Eye

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Alright!

Any a320m motherboard suggestion ?
The selection of a320m and B450 boards are drying up pretty fast right now. I honestly don't know which of the cheaper a320 boards are good, but all the best a320 boards are going to be as expensive as B450 boards. You will have to look at what is available to you and look at reviews to determine what to buy. Also, a520 and B550 boards will probably be on the market within the next 2-3 months.
 

Third-Eye

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Darkbreeze

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I would SERIOUSLY avoid getting an A320 motherboard. To start with, they are cheap, and I don't mean the price specifically. They are bottom of the barrel.

The reason I would avoid them is because if you decide to upgrade to a newer or more powerful CPU at some point, you're not going to want to do it with an A320 board so you are really limiting your options down the road. I hate to say upgrade path, because that's a seriously mis-used word, but it's about right. And you won't have much of one.

If you decide you need more than what that APU can offer and start looking at higher end CPUs later on then you are going to want to look at higher end motherboards as well. Better to spend only a few bucks more now for a B450 or even a B350 board, that you can easily swap CPUs out on later without any VRM or power delivery concerns, than to lock yourself in to a low end CPU option permanently.
 

digitalgriffin

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I'm thinking of 1x8GB 3000Mhz now. And later 1 more 8GB incase if 16GB RAM helps for video editing.
3200 and above are hard to get here in my place even if they do ,they will be at high price.
I'm trying to build as low as possible.

DotA 2 at low settings looks terrible.
As long as it won't stutter during game fights then I'm ok with mid to high settings.
As other have alluded, dual channel and fast memory makes a huge difference for APUs. That puts you in a tough spot. Run fast now, or potentially upgrade later. You could get a 4 slot motherboard. But then you wouldn't be able to use that 3600 speed memory at it's best rating with Raven Ridge (2200g). I can't even use my 3000 memory at spec with all 4 slots populated.

Video editing could be arduous and painfully slow depending how many tracks you are compositing, original video format, and how long the video is.

Reading frames from a drive cache is painfully slow. This is what happens when you are limited on memory. So more memory helps here as well as a good quality SSD that uses MLC (2 layer bit cells). I don't think there are MLC NVMe drives, so you might be relegated to RAID or specialty solutions. I'm in agreement with video editors, that using TLC and QLC drives is a landmine because their performance quickly degrades as the drives fill up and SLC cache runs out. If you are working with a 20 Gig project file (not impossible with raw data) you could find yourself running slower than some HDD solutions.


Video cards geared toward this also help. NVIDIA does have a better 1080p encoder. But to be honest you should be looking toward more workstation solutions if you do a lot of video editing.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, using one DIMM should be avoided unless it is absolutely not possible to get two. If you want 8GB of memory total, then get two 4GB modules together in ONE kit.

If you want 16GB, then get two 8GB modules together, in ONE kit.

Etc. Etc.

If you can't get 3200mhz memory, then get 3000mhz memory and run them at 2933mhz. The difference is negligible AND you probably won't easily get that 2200G with an A320 board to run at 3200mhz anyhow. It can be done, but it's not always as simple as just Abracadabra. At 2933mhz with a pair of sticks, you will have plenty fast enough memory for most pursuits.
 
Feb 13, 2019
71
3
35
0
I would SERIOUSLY avoid getting an A320 motherboard. To start with, they are cheap, and I don't mean the price specifically. They are bottom of the barrel.

The reason I would avoid them is because if you decide to upgrade to a newer or more powerful CPU at some point, you're not going to want to do it with an A320 board so you are really limiting your options down the road. I hate to say upgrade path, because that's a seriously mis-used word, but it's about right. And you won't have much of one.

If you decide you need more than what that APU can offer and start looking at higher end CPUs later on then you are going to want to look at higher end motherboards as well. Better to spend only a few bucks more now for a B450 or even a B350 board, that you can easily swap CPUs out on later without any VRM or power delivery concerns, than to lock yourself in to a low end CPU option permanently.
Well , like I said ,it's strictly for general purpose and I have no intention to look for upgrade path.

Lightroom and watching 1080p Movies are high priority.
Occasionally , DotA 2 and CS GO, just video editing with filmora.
So I just wanna know that the ryzen 2200g or 3200g APU can handle these.
 
Feb 13, 2019
71
3
35
0
As other have alluded, dual channel and fast memory makes a huge difference for APUs. That puts you in a tough spot. Run fast now, or potentially upgrade later. You could get a 4 slot motherboard. But then you wouldn't be able to use that 3600 speed memory at it's best rating with Raven Ridge (2200g). I can't even use my 3000 memory at spec with all 4 slots populated.

Video editing could be arduous and painfully slow depending how many tracks you are compositing, original video format, and how long the video is.

Reading frames from a drive cache is painfully slow. This is what happens when you are limited on memory. So more memory helps here as well as a good quality SSD that uses MLC (2 layer bit cells). I don't think there are MLC NVMe drives, so you might be relegated to RAID or specialty solutions. I'm in agreement with video editors, that using TLC and QLC drives is a landmine because their performance quickly degrades as the drives fill up and SLC cache runs out. If you are working with a 20 Gig project file (not impossible with raw data) you could find yourself running slower than some HDD solutions.


Video cards geared toward this also help. NVIDIA does have a better 1080p encoder. But to be honest you should be looking toward more workstation solutions if you do a lot of video editing.
Not towards serious video editing. But want to cut the unwanted scenes from my camera recording and all those stuff.( Family videos)
I record at 1080p 25fps mp4 format.
I can get 8GB ram now and later 1 more 8gb stick.
Just wanted to know that the APU can so that little editing work.
 

TJ Hooker

Illustrious
Herald
So long as your expectations aren't too high, sure, it could work for any of that stuff. You'd be a lot better off with one of the APUs from the Ryzen 3000 series though, as those have a much improved IPC and single core performance.
3000 series APUs are still Zen+, not Zen 2, so no big performance difference. Just a little clockspeed bump. They do use solder TIM instead of paste though.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I guess I missed that factoid, because I wasn't aware of that. Maybe I did hear something about that and just spaced it. That's lame. It's like taking an i5 and calling it an i7 because, we just want to. The more time goes on, the more AMD seems to become even more just like Intel.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Just a heads up, RAM that is not purchased together as a kit is not guaranteed to work together, even if you buy a 2nd stick of the exact same model. It could work fine, but there's a possibility you'll have issues.
With all the memory troubles Ryzen has had, even now on Zen2, it's more like a PROBABILITY than a possibility, especially at anything faster than 2666mhz if you try to use to separately purchased DIMMs together. Hard enough to get matched sets to work right at higher speeds much less when they are are technically mixed memory configurations.
 

TJ Hooker

Illustrious
Herald
Idk, I think Ryzen memory support has come a long ways, even on Zen/Zen+. Probably still not as good as Intel, where it seems pretty much any dual channel kit of around 3000 MHz or less is almost guaranteed to work, but a far cry from what it was at launch. I haven't really heard anything negative about Zen 2 memory support.

But yeah, still not going to recommend mixing RAM kits.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Man, I've been dealing with about ten threads per day with users who are unable to get their Zen2 CPUs to work with XMP settings, at all. Some of it is cluelessness. Some of it is issues. And there's been BIOS updates to address it as well. To me it has looked a lot like the original Ryzen 2000 series launch all over again as far as memory support, although it seems to be getting addressed a lot more quickly than the first two gens.
 

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