Discussion Ryzen 3000 Temperature Discussion Thread

TechyInAZ

Titan
Moderator
Hey Community!

I want to know what your temperatures are for your 3rd Gen Ryzen CPU. Specifically your Idle temps, and Load temps.
It seems like a lot of people simply do not know what are the normal temperatures for 3rd Gen Ryzen, which is why I'm making this thread, so we can make a baseline as to what temps are actually normal.


Here are my temperature results from my new Ryzen 5 3600:

Idle = 37C (but fluctuates between 37-50C regularly)
Load = 71C (Using CPU-Z's CPU Stress Tester)
Cooler = H100i V2

This thread will also serve as a discussion piece, so feel free to discuss aswell as share your temperature results!!!
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
As was mentioned to me by Computronix recently, in order to establish what is "normal", for both "idle" and "load", you also need to establish EXACTLY what is meant by idle and load, specifically. While this was written specifically for Intel architectures, Ryzen's thermal specifications and measuring methodology is so similar now that it is probably, almost certainly, of considerable importance that we can primarily assume likeness in terms of thermal definitions.

Section 11 - Thermal Test Basics

The topic of processor temperatures can be very confusing. Unfamiliar terminology and specifications, misconceptions and widespread misinformation, conflicting opinions and inconsistent test procedures leaves users uncertain of how to properly check cooling performance. Moreover, when load and idle test conditions are not clearly defined, results can be highly misleading.

• Full load is a steady-state workload at 100% TDP.
• Idle is a state of minimal activity at 1% Utilization.


In this Part of the Guide, load and idle test conditions are explained, as well as how TDP and AVX relate to thermal testing. By replicating test conditions that conform to Intel's Datasheets, valid baseline Core temperatures can be found. Applying a methodical approach minimizes variables so results will be consistent, repeatable and easier to compare. Here's how it's done:

There are three major test variables. When managed correctly, two variables become points of reference which are needed for valid test results. The remaining test variable determines your thermal performance at 100% workload and at idle. Methods for properly conducting thermal tests include managing these variables:

Environment - Intel tests their processors in a tightly controlled environment. Variables in Ambient temperature can be normalized to 22°C, which is a point of reference. Normalizing is explained under the Setup in Section 12.

Hardware - Intel tests their processors on an open bench without a case. Variables in thermal performance can be minimized by removing case covers and manually setting all fans and pump (if liquid cooled) to 100% RPM.

Software - Intel tests their processors using a steady 100% TDP workload. Variables in test software can be eliminated by using Prime95, which is a point of reference. The Small FFT's test without AVX conforms to Intel's Datasheets.

The Datasheets provide guidelines needed for a coordinated and methodical approach, so it's important to be specific. "Full load" is a popular but non-specific user term which could mean anything. Games, apps, streaming, rendering, transcoding and most utilities have partial, fluctuating workloads with fluctuating Core temperatures that are not well suited for testing thermal performance.

“Stress” tests vary widely and can be characterized into two categories; stability tests which are fluctuating workloads, and thermal tests which are steady workloads. Prime95 v29.8 Small FFT's (AVX disabled) is ideally suited for testing thermal performance, because it conforms to Intel's Datasheets as a steady 100% workload with steady Core temperatures. No other utility can so closely replicate Intel's thermal test workload.
 
Idle temperature varies a lot with ambient temps, high load temps no to so much. For any CPU idle temps would be about 10 -15c above ambient temperature and that doesn't change much with type of CPU cooler (unless of course it's chilled, sub ambient, cooler). Unless it's way out of line (like close to max recorded load temps) it's nothing to worry about.
True idle in Windows is hard to achieve and maintain, it always does something in the background even if not apparent in Task Manager.
I had 1600x, 1700x, 2700x and now 3700x and all were "idling" at 10 -15c above ambient temperatures regardless of type of CPU cooler.
So, all i can tell you is that my "average idle" temps are anywhere from 28 to 50c and that is not much of help.
Full load temps depend very much on voltages and on this setup range up to 71c while running at full PBO boost (4.37GHz on 1-2cores and ~4.25GHz on rest of cores) at up to 1.375v.
Full , all cores and stable OC at 4.4GHz and 1.425v (1.4v set and adjusted by LLc5) already nets 80c+ depending on length and type of test with 82c already lowering performance.
 
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I have a brand new Cyberpower PC with a AMD Ryzen 3900X using the stock AMD Wraith Prism air cooler. The motherboard is a MSI MPG Carbon Pro Wi-Fi and the video card is a MSI RTX2060.

After boot-up, under no load, the CPU Temp is approx 50-60 degrees centigrade. When using the CPU to encode with Handbrake 1.2.2, the CPU temp rises to ~92-95 degrees centigrade which I feel is way too high. The CPU voltage is always pretty high, about 1.38-1.4 volts. I only saw the temp drop to about 0.7 volts after I bought it but since I have installed all the software and apps, it never drops below 1.3 volts.

At idle, the CPU fan spins at 850-1000 rpm and pegs at 3000 rpm under load.

Is this normal for the 3900X or should I be concerned? My old Skylake Intel i7-6700K never got above 75 degrees centigrade.
 
Not 3rd gen, but i figured id still share it.

Ryzen 3 1200 @3.7ghz 1.2875v

Wraith Stealth 100% fan speed
P95 Small FFT test ~82c load

Arctic Freezer 34 eSports auto fan speed
P95 Small FFT test ~60c load
 
Aug 17, 2019
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Interestingly, when I changed the power options to run the CPU to a max of 99%, the CPU only hits 75 degrees, the voltage dropped to 1.100 but the CPU frequency dropped to 3.7 GHz from 3.8 GHz. When encoding, this drop made absolutely no difference in the time to encode a video file. The CPU utilization was about 70%, the same as before. The CPU fan does not ramp up to full speed any more.

I noticed that the CPU no longer goes into boost mode with the power management enabled...
 
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I updated the MSI BIOS and chipset drivers... It did not make any difference in the temp but the voltages spiked higher, to 1.45V-1.5V...
 
Aug 13, 2019
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Hey Community!

I want to know what your temperatures are for your 3rd Gen Ryzen CPU. Specifically your Idle temps, and Load temps.
It seems like a lot of people simply do not know what are the normal temperatures for 3rd Gen Ryzen, which is why I'm making this thread, so we can make a baseline as to what temps are actually normal.


Here are my temperature results from my new Ryzen 5 3600:

Idle = 37C (but fluctuates between 37-50C regularly)
Load = 71C (Using CPU-Z's CPU Stress Tester)
Cooler = H100i V2

This thread will also serve as a discussion piece, so feel free to discuss aswell as share your temperature results!!!
Using an AMd 3600x, ROG x570, Vengence 3600 memory

Idle: 39
90% usage encoding video, up to 88C.
Stock cooler with one drop of Artic Silver along with stock "glue".

Now if you want to see weird temps, try changing your processes under Task Manager and Affinity settings and get ready to scratch you head!!!!
 
Aug 13, 2019
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Interestingly, when I changed the power options to run the CPU to a max of 99%, the CPU only hits 75 degrees, the voltage dropped to 1.100 but the CPU frequency dropped to 3.7 GHz from 3.8 GHz. When encoding, this drop made absolutely no difference in the time to encode a video file. The CPU utilization was about 70%, the same as before. The CPU fan does not ramp up to full speed any more.

I noticed that the CPU no longer goes into boost mode with the power management enabled...
Try the Affinity options in Task Manager. This will make your posting seem normal when encoding.
I'll have to try your option as I like to underclock for encoding. Glad to know it doesn't go into boost mode but then again that may be your MOBO's design. :( What MOBO are you using?
 
... When using the CPU to encode with Handbrake 1.2.2, the CPU temp rises to ~92-95 degrees centigrade which I feel is way too high. ....
Prism is a very good stock cooler, but 3900X is a massive CPU. It's actually amazing it will run on it at all, much less well enough to do Handbrake encodes.

But while 95C is TjMax for Ry3k CPU's that doesn't mean you want to run bumping off it for extended periods. You should totally go looking for a better cooler if you intend to do a lot of AVX-heavy h264 encoding.
 
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I did... I opted for the Corsair H115i RGB Platinum... I had to place it on the top of the case because there was no clearance in the front of my Corsair 750D full tower because of the dual drive bays (I have a one terabyte amsung M.2 970 Plus NVME as the boot and three six terabyte WD Red drives and a single five terabyte Toshiba drive).

With the Corsair, my idle temps drop to about 37-40 degrees (CPU voltage drops to 0.95 volts) and hits 80-85 degrees when encoding. I changed the Windows Power Plan to Power Saver with the minimum CPU speed at 50% and maximum to 100%. On idle, the CPU runs about 2.2 GHz and ramps up to 4.4 GHz when encoding.

When using any other power plan (balanced, Ryzen Balanced, Ryzen High Performance, High Performance or Ultimate Performance) the CPU will boost to 4.4 GHz on idle if CPU speed is set to 100%.

When I set the CPU speed to 99% on any of these modes, the idle speed drops to 3.7 GHz on idle, i.e. it does not throttle down. The CPU temp will drop to 40-45 degrees on 1.1 volts, but will be capped to 3.7 GHz. Only the Power Saver mode can I leave the CPU speed to 100% and the CPU will throttle down during idle, allowing me to hit 4.4 GHz when needed.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's marketing crap though, not technical documentation like what they're referencing in the article I linked to. Marketing specs are often somewhat, creative. But I get it that it's been "known", it's just that the evidence seems to suggest that it's really not the same as what "common knowledge" seems to suggest. I can't imagine AMD or Intel would allow a CPU to operate normally in a range that is beyond what they themselves have publicly indicated is not safe for long term usage.
 
That's marketing crap though, ....
Gotta love the internet... cry and moan for data to know what's 'safe' for operation. So they put it out there in a very public way, a way that legally and financially commits the corporation, but they dismiss it as 'crap' and replace it with 'common knowledge'.

Or better yet, replace it with some other marketing crap ferreted from competition opposition marketing slides coupled with more 'common knowledge' opinions.

HWInfo64 reports the TJmax values, which are 'fused' values, as 95C. Now I suppose some would say Martin's just an AMD shill looking to curry favor but I really doubt that's the case.

I've loaded up my 3700x with some prime95 small FFT and watched it hit 95C, then throttle back the frequency to stay under it. I think there's a reason they did that.

I'm not saying 95C operation is all fine and peachy: it is hot and heat is any semiconductor's nemesis. But I think it's safe to say it's not a stress temperature, which is to say a temperature at which the device is so stressed it risks permanent damage. I believe that occurs somewhere north of 110C because at 115C is a thermal trip limit and an HTC limit (whatever that is) at 115.5C. These are all fused values reported by HWInfo64.
 
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Ninjawithagun

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There are numerous factors to take into account with regards to operating temperatures that you will need to literally provide a spreadsheet-like list of specific configuration states such as which AMD CPU and chipset driver versions are being used, what configuration is the AMD Ryzen Utility (stock vs. overclock) as well as which boost state was chosen within the utility, Windows 10 power plan option (e.g., Balanced vs. Performance), DDR4 memory module information, type of cooler, ambient room temperature, open case/closed case, etc. And with all of this listed, we now have to wait for the new BIOS "ABBA" to be released by the multitude of motherboard vendors this week, and for all of us to retest out systems to observe the temperature and voltage differences. I'm sure there will be plenty of unoriginal 70s ABBA band song quotes contrived to go along with this BIOS release... Yes, I am that damn old :giggle:
 
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Ninjawithagun

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3700x on Asus ROG Strix B450-F Gaming.
Idle temperature: 31-34c (Room/Ambient temperature at 22-23c)
View: https://imgur.com/fIrP3Lx

View: https://imgur.com/CtQDnQn


Temperature while Web Browsing/ light loads: ~35-37c
Max Load Temperature (while gaming or encoding videos): 60-62c
Max Temperature seen (while stress testing): 81c
What WIndows 10 power plan are you using? What are your settings within the AMD Ryzen tool? Which AMD CPU and chipset drivers do you have installed? Which BIOS version is installed? What cooler are you using? Open or closed case when running benchmarks? You get the idea...
 

DMAN999

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Apr 17, 2019
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What WIndows 10 power plan are you using? What are your settings within the AMD Ryzen tool? Which AMD CPU and chipset drivers do you have installed? Which BIOS version is installed? What cooler are you using? Open or closed case when running benchmarks? You get the idea...
I'm using the latest Chipset Drivers from AMD (1.8.19.0915) and the Ryzen Balanced Power Plan with the Minimum Processor state set to 10%.
CPU cooler is an Arctic 33 eSports Dual fan (as stated in my Signature).
My case is a mesh front mid tower with the side panel ON and 3 intake fans and 2 exhaust fans.
I am using BIOS version 2704 (also shown in my signature)
I have NOT used RM to adjust/tweak anything, I did all my tweaking via BIOS settings.

PBO Settings:
View: https://imgur.com/6QlCmxj

Digi+ VRM / LLC Settings:
View: https://imgur.com/pFAr8Io

This is how my PC is currently set up for 24/7 use, I don't bother testing my PC in a state that I can't use it 24/7 or the BIOS tweaks would be useless to me.
I have seen slightly better CB R15 (2199/206) and R20 (4915/504) scores without HWinfo or RM running.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Gotta love the internet... cry and moan for data to know what's 'safe' for operation. So they put it out there in a very public way, a way that legally and financially commits the corporation, but they dismiss it as 'crap' and replace it with 'common knowledge'.

Or better yet, replace it with some other marketing crap ferreted from competition opposition marketing slides coupled with more 'common knowledge' opinions.

HWInfo64 reports the TJmax values, which are 'fused' values, as 95C. Now I suppose some would say Martin's just an AMD shill looking to curry favor but I really doubt that's the case.

I've loaded up my 3700x with some prime95 small FFT and watched it hit 95C, then throttle back the frequency to stay under it. I think there's a reason they did that.

I'm not saying 95C operation is all fine and peachy: it is hot and heat is any semiconductor's nemesis. But I think it's safe to say it's not a stress temperature, which is to say a temperature at which the device is so stressed it risks permanent damage. I believe that occurs somewhere north of 110C because at 115C is a thermal trip limit and an HTC limit (whatever that is) at 115.5C. These are all fused values reported by HWInfo64.

I should have pointed out earlier as well that TJmax is commonly, by virtue of actual engineer input rather than what is believed by the masses, not a safe operating temperature as well. My fault actually. By the time you reach TJmax your system should already be throttling in same fashion. Anyhow, not only has AMD changed the thermal limits three times now, which may or may not be reflected in changed TJmax settings in HWinfo and Core Temp, but they've added a medium temperature range. So it gets more and more interesting all the time.

And just for the record, TH isn't going to create an article like that one, with information that ALL of the other major tech sites have also covered with the same information contained, as some kind of slander piece or oops we didn't know what we were talking about. When five major sites say the max safe temp is 80 degrees, and is then reduced to 70 degrees, and is then replaced by a medium temperature limit and moving the high temperature limit back up to 80 degrees, there IS a good reason for it. They're not doing it just because they like to do it. They're doing it because they don't want an Intel Atom situation on their hands.
 
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Try the Affinity options in Task Manager. This will make your posting seem normal when encoding.
I'll have to try your option as I like to underclock for encoding. Glad to know it doesn't go into boost mode but then again that may be your MOBO's design. :( What MOBO are you using?
I have an AMD Ryzen 9 3900X on a MSi MPG X570 Gaming Pro Carbon Wi-Fi motherboard with 32GB RAM, a MSi RTX2070 Gaming Z GPU, Samsung 1TB Evo Plus, three 6TB WD Red NAS drives and a 5TB Toshiba HDD. The CPU is cooled by a top mounted Corsair 115i RGB Platinum AIO in a Corsair 750D full tower case with a 140mm ML exhaust fan and two additional intake 140mm fans in the front of the case.

As mentioned in my last post, I am now using Windows Power Saver (CPU processor Power management Minimum speed set to 5% and Maximum is 100%) in the Power Options in the Control Panel. My CPU temp is currently running at 36 degrees and the CPU voltage is 0.95 volts and CPU speed is 2.2 GHz (it never drops below this). This is the only power plan where the CPU speed actually throttles down when no load is present. All the other power plans run the CPU in boost mode of 4.2 GHz (my CPU never hits 4.6 GHz, the max I have seen is 4.5 GHz) unless I set the max processor speed to 99% which restricts the max CPU speed to 3.72 GHz.

When encoding, the speed will increase to about 4.2 GHz on five cores (the rest average about 4.0 GHz) and the CPU temp will hit about 80-85 degrees. The CPU load hits an average of 85-90%, voltage 1.3V.

On a side note, I have watched online videos about the MSi horrible thermals on the VRMs where they reach 110-115 degrees. I have an IR temp gun and no matter where I aim the laser on the VRM, the temp never exceeds 40 degrees, whether it is on the heat sink covering the VRM or the exposed components or the underside of the motherboard. The laser cannot measure the CPU because there is no visible area of the CPU that is accessible. The H115i runs at about 35 degrees. I have four thermistors measuring the thermals, the temps show 31 degrees inside the case and 35 degrees under the AM4 socket area and the area under the VRMs as 38 degrees right now under an encoding load.

BTW, I am not sure what you mean by the affinity options in task manager...
 
Aug 17, 2019
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It will be interesting to see how AMD can resolve the max CPU speed issues if they keep adjusting the max temps down...
 
Hitting Tj max means something is very wrong with BIOS or cooling setup, it's value is only a reference to how much headroom you have to OC manually, for any auto boost it's not of any consequence because it would reduce the boost at way lower temps.
 

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