Question Ryzen 3700X stuck at 1700mhz FCLK ?

Hello all, hope you're well

Here is my system specs:

-Ryzen 3700X +200mhz pbo, runs 4200mhz during all core load like cinebench
-Asus strix 2080 ti oced
-32gb 4x8gb ddr3400 c14 fclk 1700mhz (I cant get past 1700mhz fclk)
-Seasonic 1200w Prime Gold
-Asus TUF x570 latest bios motherboard
-M.2 ssd samsung 1tb, wd 2tb

My RAM is Gskill single rank Bdie 4x8Gb rated stock 3600mhz 16-16-16-36. I always failed no matter what setting or voltage I changed to get past 1700mhz fclk stable. Now its stable at 1700mhz fclk ddr3400 14-14-15-30. I would like to run it at 3600mhz c14 but even with c16 anything past 3400mhz/1700mhz fclk is unstable, anything above 1800fclk 3600mhz doesn't even boot no matter how much voltage I give etc

Is this the limit of my 3700X? What if I upgrade to a Ryzen 5800X3D? Will it run 3600-3800mhz RAM with 1800-1900fclk or 4 sticks is still too much?

Thanks!
 

Karadjgne

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3600 is DDR. Dual Data Rate. Fclock should automatically run using Data Rate, so just setting DOCP will set the ram to 3600 16-16-16-36 and Fclock/Uclock/Mclock will be a 1:1:1 ratio at 1800.
To get Over 1800 stable will require faster than 3600 ram, so if overclocked to 3800, Fclock will be 1900. So failure to boot at anything over 1800 would be normal, as would 3400/1700.

What's the SoC voltage at?
 
Reactions: Zizo007
Its at default 1.1v but in Hwinfo shows as 1.08v.
3400mhz just crashed in the new Call of Duty but I am not sure if its the game or my PC. Others online and youtube streamers are also crashing. I tried 3600/1800 stock docp and it still crashes in Call of Duty but so far not in other tasks or games since yesterday.

Honestly I got Samsung Bdie to try to reach 3800/1900 c16.
 
Dec 22, 2022
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You have to remember that with the Ryzen 3700X the native support is for 3200. This means that anything over that is a overclock on the cpu's memory controller. Have you tried to see if 2 sticks will boot at 3600? This could be one of those times where filling all the dimm slots is actually part of the problem.
 
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Dec 22, 2022
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I would also say that with 4 sticks that the 5800X3D is not a solution because of this:

Max Memory Speed
2x1R
DDR4-3200
2x2R
DDR4-3200
4x1R
DDR4-2933
4x2R
DDR4-2667

This means that with 4 sticks at single rank you are still lowering the supported speed from 3200 even. I would highly recommend seeing what happens with two sticks in your system. If it boots at 3600, then you may want to see about getting 2x16gb sticks instead of 4x8 or just using 16 gb. 16 gb afterall is more than enough for most non-production workloads.
 
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Reactions: Crosslhs82x2
Hi
How old is your ram?
Any chance of a return?
Did you purchase the ram in a 4 stick kit or are they 2 different kits for 4x8?

If no chance of a return then 3400 / fclk 1700 stable may be the best you are going to get.

As stated above I think the 4 sticks matched or unmatched and trying to run above the mem control limit of 3200 is the issue.

My 2x16 G.skill trident z 3600
b-dies 16 16 16 36 Has no problem running 3733 with it timings.
When I try lowering to cl14 is when my system bocks at that change.
 

Karadjgne

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1, 2 and 3000 series Ryzen do Not like 4x sticks, nor do they like odd numbers in ram timings or fclock/uclock/mclock.

Ram speeds should be a clean multiplier of 266, ie. 3200 =266x12, 2933 = 266x11 etc. Deviation from that can lead to instability, boot failures etc. as fclock needs to be ½ of ram speed.

4x sticks makes that worse, dual rank even more so since dual rank works in sequential parallel, meaning infinity fabric now has to deal with 2x channels, in dual channel and dual rank. And it doesn't do that particularly well, so ram speeds by necessity get chopped.

Imagine being on a 4 lane highway, crossing all lanes to take the exit, crossing all lanes again to take the next exit, crossing 4 more lanes to take another exit, in traffic and within the space of ¼ mile. You'll not exactly be speeding.

5000 series Ryzen do Not have such architectural limitations and prefer the number 4. Dual rank on dual channel is only marginally better than dual kits of single rank in dual channel. All 16Gb sticks are dual rank, a kit being dual channel. Many 8Gb sticks, like B-die, are Single rank, so 4x stick kit in 2x2 channel is barely behind in throughput.

The only time 5000 series sees a slowdown possibly is with uber high speed ram, over 3600, and 4x sticks of dual rank. Meaning 16Gb+ or cheap 8Gb.

So a 5800x3D and bios update could solve the problem, all 4x sticks running at 3600MHz/1800 fclock DOCP with no worries.
 
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zx128k

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I have a 3800x that can do 1800 Fabric Clock with 4xDIMMs single rank which is just the common limit. 1900 Fabric Clock was were it got problems. If the infinity fabric (Fabric ClocK FCLK) is unstable at 1800, increasing the vSoC to 1.1 volts is normally enough.

Configuration Max Safe Speed (Up to) OC Speed (Up to)
2 x 1 Rank 3600MHz 4400MHz
2 x 2 Rank 3600MHz 4000MHz
4 x 1 Rank 3600MHz 4000MHz
4 x 2 Rank 2933MHz 3600MHz

You can see page 11 here that you should have no issues getting 3600MHz 4 x 1 rank. Its 4x2 rank were the max safe speed drops to 2933MHz but a maximum of 3600 is still possible. A maximum Fabric Clock of 1700 does happen on some cpu's.

SoC (System-on-Chip) Voltage: SoC voltage is the voltage supplied to supplementary components like
the, known as “System-on-Chip.” Most motherboards will automatically adjust SoC Voltage to
accommodate overclocks on DRAM. This value can be manually adjusted.

• You must be very careful with adjustment of these values, due to potential inaccuracies in how
voltage is being measured and reported; while you may set the SoC voltage to a safe level,
variations that exceed the upper limit could irreparably damage your CPU or other components.
• 1.2V is generally considered the upper limit of safe SoC voltages, particularly on Ryzen 3000
CPUs.
• Many motherboards will automatically adjust SoC voltage to suit other overclocking settings
you’ve changed.

AMD see here
  • Try playing around with ProcODT if you can't boot. This setting determines the processor's on-die termination impedance. According to Micron, higher settings of ProcODT can lead to more stable RAM, but the trade-off is potentially needing higher voltages. On Ryzen 1000 and 2000, you should try values between 40Ω and 68.6Ω due to the considerably weaker memory controller. On Ryzen 3000 and 5000, 1usmus suggests 28Ω - 40Ω. Lower settings may be harder to run but potentially helps with voltage requirements. Higher values may aid with stability, according to Micron, values of ODT above 60Ω are only suitable for extremely weak memory controllers and lower power solutions. This seems to line up with The Stilt's settings.
    Phy at AGESA defaults, except ProcODT of 40.0Ohm, an ASUS auto-rule for Optimem III.
  • Lower SOC voltage and/or VDDG IOD may help with stability.
  • On Ryzen 3000 and 5000, higher CLDO_VDDP can help with stability above DDR4-3600.
    Increasing cLDO_VDDP seems beneficial > 3600MHz MEMCLKs, as increasing it seems to improve the margins and help with potential training issues.
    Source: The Stilt.
    This value is not to exceed 1.10V on Ryzen 3000 and 5000, and should always be restricted to at least 0.10V less than DRAM Voltage.
    Source: AMD
  • When pushing FCLK around 1800 MHz, intermittent RAM training errors may be alleviated or eliminated by increasing VDDG CCD.
For AMD, run Prime95 Large FFTs and OCCT VRAM with max utilization simultaneously to stress the FCLK and ensure FCLK stability. This should be run after any frequency/FCLK change.

I had a 3800x that would overclock well RAM side, see here. Note this is with 2xDIMMs and 4,499 MHz due to water cooling. Note this score is on power with many 9900k systems of the time. My 10900k system has that RAM and another kit for 4xDIMMs (4xDIMM 3600 CL14). 4xDIMMs gave a boost to performance in time spy cpu. This is because 4xDIMMs of single rank, is treated as a dual rank setup by the memory controller. In time spy for my 10900k system this adds nearly 800+ points to the cpu score. My current 10900k system has 16k in time spy cpu which is close to a 3950x system in performance.

An AMD 5800X3D doesn't benefit much from faster RAM speeds. The cache reduces the latency and gives better gaming performance. With a 5800X3D system RAM performance is less important.
 
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Thanks for the replies everyone, it does boot at 1800fclk and even at 1900fclk but at 1800fclk Call of Duty MW2 crashes like once a week. I remember on 1700fclk it never crashed or maybe they broke the game with updates? Honestly idk if its my PC or the game's bad coding. As for anything over 1800 fclk, the PC would randomly reboot or show blue screen so I am 100% sure above 1800fclk is unstable with 4x sticks. As for trying 2 sticks it was the same situation where Call of Duty would crash. My RAM are two identical 16gb kits but unmatched. Both are same model, same speed, same voltage and same timings, single rank b-die.
 

Karadjgne

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Fclock should either be on Auto or set exactly half of whatever the ram speed is. So if you are running 3200MHz on the ram, Fclock needs to be 1600. The only time the Fclock should be at 1700 is if your ram is running at 3400MHz.

Fclock isn't any sort of boost, running it higher than needs be gets you nothing but instability. Infinity fabric is what's used to communicate between the chips, which is why it needs to be half, or lower. It's the time sent combined with time returned, there and back, and should be in sync.

You'd probably benefit more from dropping ram speeds to 3200MHz, with 14 timings (there's plenty of tutorials and vids on B-die timings) and leaving fclock at 1600 instead. The actual performance difference between 3600/16 and 3200/14 is negligible at best, nanoseconds, but the added stability of lowering clock speeds only benefits 4x sticks.
 

zx128k

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I had freezes in Destiny 2 and spent a week troubleshooting to find the issue with my overclock. Only to find that in the end it was down to the nvidia drivers and that the current new update list the problem as resolved. Note some 3700x are reported not to run at 1800 FCLK without issues. Normally its 1900 FCLK that gets you. If you believe there could be an issue with your overclock then run the correct stability tests. For AMD, run Prime95 Large FFTs and OCCT VRAM with max utilization simultaneously to stress the FCLK and ensure FCLK stability. This should be run after any frequency/FCLK change.

Setting FCLK to auto and xmp to DDR4-3600 on my motherboard would cause the system not to boot. For me 1800/3600 CL16 was faster than 1600/3200 CL14.
 
Reactions: Zizo007
It might be easier if you run the CPU at stock, and then look at the mem. Once you've tested each setting, and are stable. Then put the CPU OC back on.

Agree with others, bumping the SOC v might help here.

Keep in mind though, again as others have said, the Ryzen 3xxx CPU's have a 1:1:1 at 1600/3200. Anything above that is a bonus.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: drea.drechsler
I agree: try running CPU at stock, using PBO only, to see if memory will stabilize for you.

Also: Bdie is extremely voltage tolerant and likes it when overclocked. It's not uncommon to see it running 1.5+ V for an extremely high overclock so don't be shy pushing it up there if you've not tried yet. I've been running my GSkill 3200 kit at 3600, 1.475V for around 4 years now with never a glitch once I got timings dialed in. It's probably a good idea to make sure there's airflow across the DIMM's, but mine's never gotten more than a couple degrees warmer than it does at stock 3200 speed.
 
On a slight tangent, and although you 've already said you've updated the bios, did you clear CMOS after the update? This is crucial for normal behaviour. Keep in mind that, when you do this your OC's will be gone, even if you try to load up saved profiles. So you would have to start your OC completely from scratch, as some voltages will change with the new microcode (this typically happens, but not all the time).

You could also try this process to do a hard reset. These are the instructions from @Darkbreeze who is a big contributor here on Tom's:

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.


Sorry, I couldn't find the original Guide, so just quoted the text from another thread.
 
Fclock should either be on Auto or set exactly half of whatever the ram speed is. So if you are running 3200MHz on the ram, Fclock needs to be 1600. The only time the Fclock should be at 1700 is if your ram is running at 3400MHz.

Fclock isn't any sort of boost, running it higher than needs be gets you nothing but instability. Infinity fabric is what's used to communicate between the chips, which is why it needs to be half, or lower. It's the time sent combined with time returned, there and back, and should be in sync.

You'd probably benefit more from dropping ram speeds to 3200MHz, with 14 timings (there's plenty of tutorials and vids on B-die timings) and leaving fclock at 1600 instead. The actual performance difference between 3600/16 and 3200/14 is negligible at best, nanoseconds, but the added stability of lowering clock speeds only benefits 4x sticks.
Yes I always use fclk half my ram speed.
 
It might be easier if you run the CPU at stock, and then look at the mem. Once you've tested each setting, and are stable. Then put the CPU OC back on.

Agree with others, bumping the SOC v might help here.

Keep in mind though, again as others have said, the Ryzen 3xxx CPU's have a 1:1:1 at 1600/3200. Anything above that is a bonus.
I am not overclocking my CPU, or you also mean PBO? I am using auto pbo.
 
I agree: try running CPU at stock, using PBO only, to see if memory will stabilize for you.

Also: Bdie is extremely voltage tolerant and likes it when overclocked. It's not uncommon to see it running 1.5+ V for an extremely high overclock so don't be shy pushing it up there if you've not tried yet. I've been running my GSkill 3200 kit at 3600, 1.475V for around 4 years now with never a glitch once I got timings dialed in. It's probably a good idea to make sure there's airflow across the DIMM's, but mine's never gotten more than a couple degrees warmer than it does at stock 3200 speed.
So increasing ram voltage will increase 4x sticks stability even if I am running ram at stock 3600mhz speed?
 
On a slight tangent, and although you 've already said you've updated the bios, did you clear CMOS after the update? This is crucial for normal behaviour. Keep in mind that, when you do this your OC's will be gone, even if you try to load up saved profiles. So you would have to start your OC completely from scratch, as some voltages will change with the new microcode (this typically happens, but not all the time).

You could also try this process to do a hard reset. These are the instructions from @Darkbreeze who is a big contributor here on Tom's:

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the BIOS to fully reset and force recreation of the hardware tables.


Sorry, I couldn't find the original Guide, so just quoted the text from another thread.
Whenever I update my bios it resets all my settings but I didn't clear cmos. I have tge same problem on several bios versions.
 

Karadjgne

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Cmos is a stored list of settings, it gets stored by Windows at shutdown and is kept alive by the psu or battery. When you update the bios, it changes all the default bios setting values, but upon restart, Bios asks CMOS to apply it's stored values during POST. The only way to guarantee that CMOS is taken out of the loop is to clear the CMOS, which forces bios to start from scratch and Discover any and all hardware, the hardware id's, necessary settings and voltages etc.
 
Reactions: Roland Of Gilead
1600mhz fclock should work on every ryzen 2nd gen out there, 1700 and above is silicon lottery, mine for example can handle max 1866 with single bit errors, which are hardware corrected, but it also needs lots of voltage to be stable, 1800mhz is stable with safe voltages (higher then default), with stock voltages i can go as high as 1766mhz


anyway we dont see in your posts what voltages your mainboard using...sooo, to know for sure when overclocking if issue is from your RAM modelus or from infonity fabric is really simple, reduce infinity clock to half (2:1 ram/fclock ratio), that way if you still experience BSOD, then your ram overclocking is not stable (timings/voltages/frequency), you will need to fix that first, then you can try to toy with infinity fabric overclocking
 
So increasing ram voltage will increase 4x sticks stability even if I am running ram at stock 3600mhz speed?
It can help. But you are overclocking no matter how you many times you say it's "stock speed" because the CPU's IMC is rated for 3200 Mtps and two sticks per channel is inherently less stable with most motherboards depending on memory interconnect topology. But B-Die is voltage tolerant and so not risking anything making it worth a try.
 
Honestly I am starting to think its an issue with Call of Duty as all my other games don't crash. In previous cod vanguard the first few months it would crash then one day they made an update and it wasn't crashing anymore. Currently when cod modern warfare 2 crashes, it just shows a crash report and says to send it to Activision/Blizzard, PC doesn't restart like when fclk is over 1800.
 

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