Question Ryzen 3700x vs 3600 for video editing/rendering

Which processor?


  • Total voters
    6
Sep 14, 2019
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Hi all, I'm currently tossing up the 3700x or 3600 for my upcoming build. Will being my computer for video editing/3d work, utilising programs such as Premiere, After Effects, Blender and Maya. I will also be doing some gaming on my 1440p ultrawide. If I go with the 3700x my GPU will likely be either the 5700 or 2060, but if I go with the 3600 I will be able to pick either the 5700xt or 2070. My key points of consideration are:
-should I go with 6 or 8 cores?
-longevity into the future
-extra $100 for 3700x worth it for a tad bit more performance?
-should I go with 3600 and upgrade GPU instead
-CPU vs GPU in programs such as Maya and Premiere
-thoughts about 2700x? - 8 cores for cheaper

Thanks guys!
 
Hi all, I'm currently tossing up the 3700x or 3600 for my upcoming build. Will being my computer for video editing/3d work, utilising programs such as Premiere, After Effects, Blender and Maya. I will also be doing some gaming on my 1440p ultrawide. If I go with the 3700x my GPU will likely be either the 5700 or 2060, but if I go with the 3600 I will be able to pick either the 5700xt or 2070. My key points of consideration are:
-should I go with 6 or 8 cores?
-longevity into the future
-extra $100 for 3700x worth it for a tad bit more performance?
-should I go with 3600 and upgrade GPU instead
-CPU vs GPU in programs such as Maya and Premiere
-thoughts about 2700x? - 8 cores for cheaper

Thanks guys!
3700x/2700x for heavy multitasking. 3600(x) and 3700x have same single core performance which is about 15% better than 2700x.
 
2700X only if you don't all-core overclock since it can PBO much better than the 3700X.

But if you're willing to work on stabilizing an all-core overclock on it, the 3700X would provide better performance in rendering and encoding. With proper cooling you might get a 4.3Ghz all-core overclock on a 3700X which is about 100Mhz higher than the all-core overclock you can get on 2700X. Add in the 15% better IPC, that's clearly the superior choice.

BUT: you have to work at it with truly good cooling and a motherboard with strong VRM. If you DON'T want to attempt an all-core (which is a bit of a gamble in any case), a 2700X uses PBO to significantly better advantage, boosting to 4.3Ghz even under load, 4.4Ghz in some cases whereas a 3700X in PBO will lower clocks to 4.05-4.1Ghz under heavy loads. That's why I voted for the 2700X.

But then again, I might be wrong. In either case and in general I'd say to go for cores for rendering and encoding so the 3600 is clearly out.
 
Last edited:

jon96789

Upstanding
Aug 17, 2019
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For video editing, the more cores the better. i use my 3900X for editing and it is a LOT faster than my old Intel i7-6700K using Handbrake to encode videos. Who took 2.5 hours to encode now takes only 45-60 minutes. If the application can utilize the GPU for rendering, you will find that it is even faster, dropping the render time to 30-45 minutes but there is a caveat. I find that videos rendered using the GPU can stutter in complex scenes. Using the software does not have this issue. Another factor is that software rendered videos are generally smaller than hardware rendered videos, by about 10-20%. I also noticed that encoding time varies even when using the same settings when using hardware encoding, I have not been able to figure that one out...
 

drivinfast247

Respectable
2700X only if you don't all-core overclock since it can PBO much better than the 3700X.

But if you're willing to work on stabilizing an all-core overclock on it, the 3700X would provide better performance in rendering and encoding. With proper cooling you might get a 4.3Ghz all-core overclock on a 3700X which is about 100Mhz higher than the all-core overclock you can get on 2700X. Add in the 15% better IPC, that's clearly the superior choice.

BUT: you have to work at it with truly good cooling and a motherboard with strong VRM. If you DON'T want to attempt an all-core (which is a bit of a gamble in any case), a 2700X uses PBO to significantly better advantage, boosting to 4.3Ghz even under load, 4.4Ghz in some cases whereas a 3700X in PBO will lower clocks to 4.05-4.1Ghz under heavy loads. That's why I voted for the 2700X.

But then again, I might be wrong. In either case and in general I'd say to go for cores for rendering and encoding so the 3600 is clearly out.
But wouldn't the increase in IPC outweigh the slightly lower boost clocks on the 3700x?
 
But wouldn't the increase in IPC outweigh the slightly lower boost clocks on the 3700x?
I think it would if you use both (or either) in full-on stock. The question hinges on which method of overclocking you want to pursue.

On even middling B450 motherboards, e.g. Tomahawks, 2700X's have PBO'd very effectively. It takes not much more effort than enabling it, pushing parameters (PPT, TDC, EDC) to the max and lowering Vcore a bit to keep it cool. And better yet: it's inherently stable.

With a 3700X, PBO doesn't really help much with all-core work loads. For that kind of work they are much more effectively all-core overclocked but that takes a beefy motherboard and cooling and some time investment to test for stability since this is inherently unstable.

It's still good though...so you might be right. But I like 2700X for the boost they get in all-core workloads with PBO that 3700X's don't get. So that's why i voted for it!
 
Something is wrong with that statement, a month ago I switched from 2700x to 3700x and single and multicore PBO is at average100 - 150MHz higher and single core by 200MHz. That's on same MB with 1003ABBA BIOS.
With ABBA BIOS my 3700X also boosts very nicely...on light bursty loads. I do agree, with it's superior IPC, it's going to perform better than a 2700X will even in gaming tasks where it's really not heavily stressed on any cores.

But OP's target workload is all-core heavy rendering and video encoding. In such an extreme workload my 3700X's boosting drops to 4.1Ghz maybe even as low as 4.05. A well-cooled 2700X under PBO with a negative voltage offset can hold it's boost clocks very much better than that. Maybe it depends too much on the silicon lottery, but it seems to me relative performance should reflect that.
 
Might be more up to BIOS and VRM, my runs at 4.37 GHz when all cores are loaded to gills, 100% or thereabouts. 2700 was doing barely 4.1 in same condition.
Also, not all video and graphic programs use all cores, most are still single core/thread affair.
 

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