[SOLVED] Ryzen 3900x Vcore Voltage on Auto?

firatkonuslu

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Jan 28, 2019
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Hi I am a ryzen 3900x user. I clock it @3,8 ghz. (Until having a better cooler)
3000mhz Ram. Boost is disabled. I am leaving the vcore and dram voltage at auto.
I run a cinebench r23 stress test. (Multi core)

The Voltage of cpu is between 1,08-1,12 v temp is 58C, power usage: 103W,



RAM is 1,25v temp 43C…

As far as I know, these are normal values. But I am reading all over the net that leaving the voltages on auto is not recommended as the cpu works unnecessarily with high voltages. Yet, this seems not be the case in my example. Am I missing something? Are those voltages actually high?
 
As far as I know, these are normal values. But I am reading all over the net that leaving the voltages on auto is not recommended as the cpu works unnecessarily with high voltages. Yet, this seems not be the case in my example. Am I missing something? Are those voltages actually high?
When the processor has all the cores working, the voltages will look more or less normal, because the CPU isn't trying to push the frequencies that hard. You need higher voltages to push to higher frequencies. Where it goes into a "high" area is when there's only one or two cores working and it'll boost itself even further. Higher voltages are required to attain those frequencies.

The whole "Ryzen voltages are too high!" are probably coming from people who are probably used to older processors or Intel processors. An AMD rep on reddit confirmed that Ryzen's voltage range can go up to 1.5V. The only voltage that's "too high" is the breakdown voltage, which is when insulators can no longer act as such and start carrying current. Higher voltages also allow more current to go through a transistor. More current means more heat, which could lead to a point where the magic smoke escapes the part. (see https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/195573/high-current-or-high-voltage-that-damages-components)
 
Hi I am a ryzen 3900x user. I clock it @3,8 ghz. (Until having a better cooler)
3000mhz Ram. Boost is disabled. I am leaving the vcore and dram voltage at auto.
I run a cinebench r23 stress test. (Multi core)

The Voltage of cpu is between 1,08-1,12 v temp is 58C, power usage: 103W,



RAM is 1,25v temp 43C…

As far as I know, these are normal values. But I am reading all over the net that leaving the voltages on auto is not recommended as the cpu works unnecessarily with high voltages. Yet, this seems not be the case in my example. Am I missing something? Are those voltages actually high?
It's not recommended only in case it's pushed too high (1.3v+) under load. At idle it's less important because power is low. So you are somewhere toward lowest voltage possible.
 
As far as I know, these are normal values. But I am reading all over the net that leaving the voltages on auto is not recommended as the cpu works unnecessarily with high voltages. Yet, this seems not be the case in my example. Am I missing something? Are those voltages actually high?
When the processor has all the cores working, the voltages will look more or less normal, because the CPU isn't trying to push the frequencies that hard. You need higher voltages to push to higher frequencies. Where it goes into a "high" area is when there's only one or two cores working and it'll boost itself even further. Higher voltages are required to attain those frequencies.

The whole "Ryzen voltages are too high!" are probably coming from people who are probably used to older processors or Intel processors. An AMD rep on reddit confirmed that Ryzen's voltage range can go up to 1.5V. The only voltage that's "too high" is the breakdown voltage, which is when insulators can no longer act as such and start carrying current. Higher voltages also allow more current to go through a transistor. More current means more heat, which could lead to a point where the magic smoke escapes the part. (see https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/195573/high-current-or-high-voltage-that-damages-components)
 

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