Question Ryzen 3rd gen APUs

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Titan
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The 3200g/3400g are only slightly higher clocked Zen+ versions of the 2200g/2400g, not going to be much faster.

For whatever the 7nm APU models are going to be, I'd say those are still too far into the future to have any meaningful impact on purchasing decision at the moment as they likely are the better part of a year away, possibly more depending on when AMD plans to unveil its 4000-series.
 
The 3200g/3400g are only slightly higher clocked Zen+ versions of the 2200g/2400g, not going to be much faster.
....
But they are on the same 12nm as Zen+ and also should benefit from the IPC uplift that brought. That was about 8-10% improvement if i remember?

Also, these have a soldered heat spreader (like rest of Ryzen) so that should help the overclockers...CPU or GPU.

I've been reading the 2200/2400 are really big sellers and the expectation is 3200/3400 will continue with that. In fact, for all the excitement surrounding 12 and 16 core chips the 3200/3400 and 3600 chips are expected to be AMD's cash cow.
 
Ipc uplift wasnt nearly that much from zen to zen+

The performance should be slightly faster than current apus, but not much. Maybe 10% over current apus thanks to ipc uplift and mainly faster clocks.

I dont remember if the vega is clocked any higher, but these apus will still have the best graphics of any CPUS.
 
Big sellers? According to Mindfactory numbers, AMD sells 6-7X as many 2600/2600X as it sells 2200G/2400G and the 2600s together account for more sales than all other Ryzen models combined, followed by the 2700X outselling what is left after the 2600s. The APUs are almost negligible.
Does mindfactory include world-wide OEM sales? That would seem to me the biggest consumer of the APU's going into pre-builts.

I've understood mindfactory to be a limited cross-section of the CPU market and needs to be analyzed carefully. I think their numbers a reflective of the EU market, for instance, not North America nor Asia.
 
A CPU difference/increase of 10% sounds about right, including increase in clocks and Zen+ improvements. As long as you have the best RAM you can get for it, that is.

I'm thinking about buying one after benchmarks land, as I really want to upgrade my good ol' A8 3850 xD

Cheers!
 
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Compare 2200g sales vs something like an i3 8100 exclusing oems.

Ryzen apus have a purpose but most gamers use dedicated graphics anyway so the apus get overshined.

In reality if AMD made a 4c/8t apu with vega 11 and 7nm, it would sell well, but the 3600 would sell even better even at a higher price.
 
Yep. It seems to be companies like cyber power that use 2200g systems as an entry level gaming system.
Larger OEM companies sell soo much more Intel than AMD systems. I think HP and Dell make a few gaming systems based on AMD, but i'd imagine they don't sell as well as Intel ones.
 
If you go to major OEMs like Dell and HP, they have entire product lines that are Intel-only and product lines that have AMD variants have far fewer options. They aren't taking AMD too seriously yet.
With all the various incentives, allocations and co-promotionals (Intel Inside) they can bring to bear, 'tis very hard to break a monopoly's stranglehold on the market. Mindshare is an indicator of the DIY market which, fan-boyism aside, is much less easily controlled.
 
Yep. It seems to be companies like cyber power that use 2200g systems as an entry level gaming system.
Larger OEM companies sell soo much more Intel than AMD systems. I think HP and Dell make a few gaming systems based on AMD, but i'd imagine they don't sell as well as Intel ones.
Intel outsells AMD, that's a fact. So being a big seller for AMD doesn't mean it sells as much as Intel either. I can walk through my local Microcenter and Walmart and get a pretty good idea. Of all the pre-builts on the floor (or in boxes) with AMD processors 80-90% of them have 2200 or 2400's...even those with discrete graphics. None Dell or HP but no-name, low-end entry level for sure but the numbers are what matters. And they are almost throw-away cheap.
 
Odd. Must be different where you live.

If i walk into my local walmart or best buy, most units use nvidia+intel. If not, they are Intel units with IGPUs. I have seen a few amd ryzen apu laptops.
I wish my nearest microcenter wasnt 3 hours away. Otherwise i would buy the $80 ryzen 5 1600.
 
Odd. Must be different where you live.

If i walk into my local walmart or best buy, most units use nvidia+intel. If not, they are Intel units with IGPUs. I have seen a few amd ryzen apu laptops.
I wish my nearest microcenter wasnt 3 hours away. Otherwise i would buy the $80 ryzen 5 1600.
The first time I went into my Microcenter looking to see what they had for Ryzen it was one 1800X and a couple of 1600 based systems... the 1800X was tricked out with two 1080TI's on a CH6 and CCL cooling. That's the only high-end Ryzen system I've ever seen in a store (B&M or Web) and it was before Zen+ or Raven Ridge release.

The next time I checked it was mostly (about 5 on display and a couple more the guy could drag out if I wanted to see them) budget prebuilts with 2200's and one or two 2400. The differentiator was how tricked out on RGB and/or discrete graphics. The one lonely 2600X on display had a 1070ti with it. He did say they could order up any processor i wanted.

Walmarts can be funny, especially in different markets, but that's the impression I got browsing AMD prebuilts in the web store. But I do recall coming across the only AMD system in a Walmart store and it was a 2400G. I remember because when I saw the AMD trade mark I was fully expecting an FX or AM3 APU and was surprised to see it.
 

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