[SOLVED] Ryzen 5 1600 or Intel i3-8100?

ManOfArc

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I want to build a really low cost budget gaming computer. My choices are the i3-8100 or the Ryzen 5 1600. Both are going for about the same price right now. They will sit in a really low end motherboard of about equal price. No overclocking intended. My question is; which CPU is the better gaming CPU with something like an RX 580?

2nd part of my question: is the Wraith Spire 95W Cooler that comes with the Ryzen the one with the LED ring?
 
Mar 12, 2019
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First get 1600 its great gaming CPU and you can upgrade later to gen 2 ryzen if you want for me ryzen because its more budget friendly and have more cores and treated than 8100.Its not rgb wraith prism is rgb and its in 2700x box :)
So 8100 (cores:4 Threads :4)
1600 (cores:6 Threads :12)
So AMD Ryzen 1600 all the way :)
 

Karadjgne

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Ryzen. Has more threads, which will benefit a broader variety of games. Best performance with 3200MHz. And has OC ability on anything but A-series mobo's.
Intel. Doesn't matter what ram, 2666MHz is good. No OC possible, so go cheap mobo is fine.

No, the Led is the Wraith that comes with either 2nd Gen Ryzens or the 1700.
 

gggplaya

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Should be a good board. The Ryzen was a no brainer because the i3 has no turbo clock, you're stuck at 4 thread performance at 3.6ghz and it has no upgrade path other than trying to find a used CPU of the same generation.
 

ManOfArc

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Ah, thanks guys. Seems unanimous. I guess it will be the 1st gen Ryzen. Just in case I try to OC the 1600 some day, would a B350 board with no heat sinks be safe? It does have solid caps.
 

Karadjgne

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Herald
I'd not put much faith in any motherboard that did not have at least rudimentary heatsinking. Those boards pate designed for grandma's who only use the pc to surf knitting websites and play solitaire. Anything that can severely tax a cpu, such as gaming, will put the VRM's through a thermal workout.
This board is currently cheaper than the cheapest B350. And better than many.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $184.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-13 20:41 EDT-0400

And yes, it'll handle OC.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
I'd not put much faith in any motherboard that did not have at least rudimentary heatsinking.
Heatsinks that are merely sitting on top of the FETs' plastic/epoxy package don't really help much when the package has 20+C/W thermal resistance. If you really want to cool the VRM, scrap the ornamental heatsinks and increase airflow across the VRM area on both sides of the PCB. If you really want to suck heat out of SMD components, you have to either solder the heatsink to the components' ground/power plane or pack its thermal pad with vias (use solder and copper+plating as TIM to pump heat through the PCB) and stick the heatsink on the other side.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Lol, very true. Which is why, I suppose, that neither Intel nor amd has strayed from using downdraft style stock coolers. Well, amd did one time with the FX 9590 stock cooler, but that was a short lived failure of an experiment. Either way, there's definitely a breeze across the entire voltage regulatory circuitry surrounding the socket. Something many towers fail miserably at.

But. With VRM heatsinking, anything is better than nothing at all.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
But. With VRM heatsinking, anything is better than nothing at all.
The board's copper power/ground planes are the FETs' primary heatsinks and the ornamental heatsink on top of them obstructs airflow across the PCB. As long as there is flow going against the board itself and the copper planes have been designed reasonably well, the VRM should be better off without heatsinks on top.
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Huh, never thought of it that way. You'd think the poa for the heatsink would be at a ground plane then. At least one of the 2 screws.
Screws are no good for heat dissipation, the thermal path is far too long and narrow: the screw has no contact with the board itself, only its head at one end and the nut at the other so heat has to transfer from the board to the nut, then the entire screw's length and its head before reaching the heatsink. When heatsinks get attached to boards to help heat-sink SMD components through the ground plane, the heatsink is soldered to the motherboard either directly or using some number of press-fitted studs.

Ideally, motherboard manufacturers should put the FETs on the back of the board, fill power/ground pads (whichever each component is designed to sink its heat into) with vias and put the heatsink(s) on the top side.
 
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ManOfArc

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Jul 8, 2017
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I'd not put much faith in any motherboard that did not have at least rudimentary heatsinking. Those boards pate designed for grandma's who only use the pc to surf knitting websites and play solitaire. Anything that can severely tax a cpu, such as gaming, will put the VRM's through a thermal workout.
This board is currently cheaper than the cheapest B350. And better than many.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2 GHz 6-Core Processor ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($64.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $184.98
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-13 20:41 EDT-0400


And yes, it'll handle OC.
I was about to order that motherboard, but Newegg had a 20% off sale on this Gigabyte AB350M-Gaming 3 instead. Hope I didn't make a mistake. I really wanted a mATX rather than an ATX, anyway. I did go with the Ryzen 6 core over the Coffee Lake quad core.
 

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