Question Ryzen 5 2600 temps insanely high (113 degrees Celsius)

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
I had my amd stock cooler installed earlier. In aida64 I got 78 degrees Celsius after about 5 mins of testing. I then installed my Arctic freezer 34 esports duo, which I thought would lower the temps... Yes I installed thermal paste, it's the mx4 Arctic thermal paste and I used most of the 0.9g they gave me which was enough.. I ran aida64 for a whole bit of 5 seconds and it spiked up to 90 degrees... I stopped it and was like wtf, I tried benchmarks and gaming temps were fine at 50s then I went into BIOS, gave the CPU 4ghz on auto voltage, 3200mhz on ram running 1.2 volts and I put the voltage offset to 0.300 which I was warned about damaging the cpu but the guide said it was fine. I thought that was safe and stable for the cooler,but I was wrong, I booted up and fans went full speed, I tried checking temps but I forgot where u check them in a panic so it took me 5 mins, the temps were 110+ degrees Celsius... I instantly shut the pc off and went into BIOS, in bios I got a good 39 degrees idling temp. Does anybody know if first of all, the temps did any damage? I didn't see any screen glitching and second of all does anybody k ow what this could be? This is the 2nd day I have been running the pc with all new parts... Here are the specs.
⏺ CiT blitz case
⏺ Gigabyte Aorus B450 Pro
⏺ Ryzen 5 2600
⏺ Arctic freezer esports 34 duo
⏺ 3200mhz 16gb cl16 Corsair vengeance
⏺ Corsair Vs650 psu
⏺ 1tb Seagate barracuda hard drive
⏺ P120 rear exhaust fan
⏺ No intake fans from rear as the ones provided with case were not working as well as the RGB for case, maybe because the 4 pin molex isn't connected because it doesn't fit anywhere in the mobo???
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Molex doesn't plug into the mobo, it goes directly to the psu.

Cpu should have instituted shutdown long before getting to 110°C +

You only need a large grain of rice sized blob of paste centered on the cpu, not the whole tube, that's about 3-4x as much as was useful.

I'd honestly run the pc with bios at factory default settings until you learn a whole lot more about OC, voltages etc.
 
Reactions: DMAN999
Jun 8, 2019
47
3
35
0
Molex doesn't plug into the mobo, it goes directly to the psu.

Cpu should have instituted shutdown long before getting to 110°C +

You only need a large grain of rice sized blob of paste centered on the cpu, not the whole tube, that's about 3-4x as much as was useful.

I'd honestly run the pc with bios at factory default settings until you learn a whole lot more about OC, voltages etc.
Arctic recommends applying the thermal paste over the heat pipes of the cooler that come into contact with the processor. I don't know why, cause everyone says that a grain of rice or pea sized dot is enough. Maybe for that cooler it's better in the way they recommend.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Many years ago, common belief held it that you needed to pre-apply a dab of paste to direct contact heatpipe coolers, and use a credit card to scrape away excess. This supposedly forced paste into the tiny groves between the heatpipes and gave better results. That was when the direct contact method was a new design. Since then, manufacturing processes have improved and there really isn't (or shouldn't be) any such flaws now. It couldn't hurt, but best results are obtained by paste that looks like it's spray painted on, far less than 1mm thick. The amount of space between the heatpipes and the fact that that space does nothing since it's not actually in contact with the cpu kinda blew the myth, you really don't need to, consider it optional.

Paste itself is an insulator, it's that bad at thermal transmission. It's really nothing more than a medium to hold the minerals, silicates and other substrates that are good thermal conductors. It's those that do all the work. So having thin paste is a benefit. It's also a whole lot less messy, doesn't drip down the sides into the socket etc. Most pastes are not electrically conductive, so paste in the pins can be an issue.

Edit: ahh OK. Arctic has 3 basic designs. Base, direct contact (base with visible pipes) and the newly designed Direct Touch, which has no base worth mentioning. In that case, yes, you apply the paste to the heatsink, not the cpu as there's no base to spread the paste.

Honestly not a brilliant idea for Ryzens as they use 2-3 chiplets spread out under the lid, not a single small die like Intel. So you might not be getting great die contact.
 
Last edited:

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Molex doesn't plug into the mobo, it goes directly to the psu.

Cpu should have instituted shutdown long before getting to 110°C +

You only need a large grain of rice sized blob of paste centered on the cpu, not the whole tube, that's about 3-4x as much as was useful.

I'd honestly run the pc with bios at factory default settings until you learn a whole lot more about OC, voltages etc.
I know all. About overclocking and I've realised the clocks I put on it were fine but I resettled it to factory settings just like I used it before and even a simple boot into Windows puts it to 90 degrees Celsius. Read the thread fully before replying mate I used the little 0.9g yoke and not a 4g tube... And even if I applied too much it shouldn't overheat like this..
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
And where does the molex plug into? The molex is a 4 pin and there is nothing it could connect to into my psu, there is an identical molex coming off my psu, spare 2 pcie plugs and 6 SATAs. Nothing else.
 

DMAN999

Reputable
Herald
Are you absolutely sure you used the correct standoffs for the Arctic 34 cooler and are they installed in the proper orientation ???
I just went through this with someone else a few days ago and they had the wrong standoffs installed which meant the cooler was Not tight to the CPU and therefore was not cooling it properly.
Once he used the correct standoffs and oriented them properly his temps dropped to where they should be.
I have an Arctic 33 and it is essentially the same cooler but with a different fans and different mounting system.
My idle temps are around 29-30C with a room temperature of around 22 C (71 F).
The hardware this cooler uses can be seen here:
https://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/9055/arctic-freezer-34-esports-duo-cpu-cooler-review/index4.html

You also need to plug the fan cables into your Motherboards CPU__Fan header and set the Fan profile in the BIOS or with whatever software you use for fan control.
If the fans are NOT plugged in and turning then the cooler will NOT cool your CPU like it should.
The CPU_Fan header location is shown on pages 5 and 13 of your MB manual:
http://download.gigabyte.us/FileList/Manual/mb_manual_b450-aorus-pro-wifi_1002_e_190528.pdf
 
Last edited:

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
The wire coming from the fan, how many are there? If it's rgb fan, there will be 2 wires, one for fan and one for rgb, and the RGB is normally a 4pin that looks Alot like a molex. There are some fans that are not rgb but led and will still have 2 wires, a molex and a regular 3 or 4pin. Those fans can he powered either way, straight to the psu or via mobo, but not both at once. Arctic I know has fans with 2 wires, designed for daisy-chain--motherboard to fan, to fan etc.
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Are you absolutely sure you used the correct standoffs for the Arctic 34 cooler and are they installed in the proper orientation ???
I just went through this with someone else a few days ago and they had the wrong standoffs installed which meant the cooler was Not tight to the CPU and therefore was not cooling it properly.
Once he used the correct standoffs and oriented them properly his temps dropped to where they should be.
I have an Arctic 33 and it is essentially the same cooler but with a different fans and different mounting system.
My idle temps are around 29-30C with a room temperature of around 22 C (71 F).
The hardware this cooler uses can be seen here:
https://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/9055/arctic-freezer-34-esports-duo-cpu-cooler-review/index4.html
Actually, I had a struggle figuring out which stand offs it uses, but when I found out which ones where right, my backplate on the pc was very very loose, I stuck a bit of paper in between the case and the back plate and then screwed it in and it seemed tight, I then installed the thumb screws and the CPU cooler seemed tight and it's literally touching the CPU well but it shouldn't overheat... The backplate that came with the b450 is an absolute -------------- it wouldn't want to screw the standoffs into it
 
Last edited by a moderator:

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Arctic recommends applying the thermal paste over the heat pipes of the cooler that come into contact with the processor. I don't know why, cause everyone says that a grain of rice or pea sized dot is enough. Maybe for that cooler it's better in the way they recommend.
I have done n that.
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Many years ago, common belief held it that you needed to pre-apply a dab of paste to direct contact heatpipe coolers, and use a credit card to scrape away excess. This supposedly forced paste into the tiny groves between the heatpipes and gave better results. That was when the direct contact method was a new design. Since then, manufacturing processes have improved and there really isn't (or shouldn't be) any such flaws now. It couldn't hurt, but best results are obtained by paste that looks like it's spray painted on, far less than 1mm thick. The amount of space between the heatpipes and the fact that that space does nothing since it's not actually in contact with the cpu kinda blew the myth, you really don't need to, consider it optional.

Paste itself is an insulator, it's that bad at thermal transmission. It's really nothing more than a medium to hold the minerals, silicates and other substrates that are good thermal conductors. It's those that do all the work. So having thin paste is a benefit. It's also a whole lot less messy, doesn't drip down the sides into the socket etc. Most pastes are not electrically conductive, so paste in the pins can be an issue.

Edit: ahh OK. Arctic has 3 basic designs. Base, direct contact (base with visible pipes) and the newly designed Direct Touch, which has no base worth mentioning. In that case, yes, you apply the paste to the heatsink, not the cpu as there's no base to spread the paste.

Honestly not a brilliant idea for Ryzens as they use 2-3 chiplets spread out under the lid, not a single small die like Intel. So you might not be getting great die contact.
Yeah I applied paste to the cooler and it was fine at first in games anol but then I overclock Ed it and it -------- it in worst time possible but I turned it to stock settings and it's running at 90 so I can't use the pc.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

DMAN999

Reputable
Herald
Karadjgne,
This is a Non-RGB Dual Fan cooler so one fan connects to the other (it has a built in y-splitter to daisy chain them) and then gets plugged into the CPU_FAN header.


killeruchmad555,
I believe the other users had a similar issue with his back plate and used plastic washers on the back side of the motherboard to get it tight enough as well.
Does your cooler wiggle around on the CPU at all ?
If it does then you will need to get it tighter with washers or whatever is necessary.
 
Last edited:

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
The wire coming from the fan, how many are there? If it's rgb fan, there will be 2 wires, one for fan and one for rgb, and the RGB is normally a 4pin that looks Alot like a molex. There are some fans that are not rgb but led and will still have 2 wires, a molex and a regular 3 or 4pin. Those fans can he powered either way, straight to the psu or via mobo, but not both at once. Arctic I know has fans with 2 wires, designed for daisy-chain--motherboard to fan, to fan etc.
No no no, the fans are 6 pins connector that u must connect to the pcb given with the case and that's not what I'm on about... There's a 4 pin molex power connector coming off the front panel and it cannot connect to my psu as nothing fits it. I think I need to buy a molex to 4 pin adapter or something.
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Karadjgne,
This is a Non-RGB Dual Fan cooler so one fan connects to the other (it has a built in y-splitter to daisy chain them) and then gets plugged into the CPU_FAN header.


killeruchmad555,
I believe the other users had a similar issue with his back plate and used plastic washers on the back side of the motherboard to get it tight enough as well.
Does your cooler wiggle around on the CPU at all ?
If it does then you will need to get it tighter with washers or whatever is necessary.
Yup it wiggles slightly, where can I get these washers from? Or is there any cooler that comes with an Am4 socket backplate that I could get? I could return this one because I've only had it for like 2 weeks.
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
No Profanity
You will need to check the size of the posts on the backplate and measure (or estimate) what thickness you need and then order them online or look at local hardware stores.
They should not be hard to find.
Or you can contact Arctic and see if they have a solution.
Can't be -------- to measure -------, everything should fit so I'm gonna somehow contact them and see if they can send me out standoffs
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
Search your case manual, or manually trace down where that molex goes to. Molex are almost always standard in one direction, if it was meant to be plugged to psu it would not need an adapter, it would have a male end to match standard psu females. It could very well be just an additional front plug end from another component or fan or pcb or chain, that is supposed to supply power somewhere, not be powered.
 

killeruchmad555

Prominent
Jun 2, 2018
26
0
530
0
Search your case manual, or manually trace down where that molex goes to. Molex are almost always standard in one direction, if it was meant to be plugged to psu it would not need an adapter, it would have a male end to match standard psu females. It could very well be just an additional front plug end from another component or fan or pcb or chain, that is supposed to supply power somewhere, not be powered.
I would've tried it if there wa a case manual. This is the CiT blitz and when I look it up there is nothing..
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS