[SOLVED] Ryzen 5 3600 overclocking

It does give some benefits in fps in gaming.
what is the recommended voltage for let's say 4Ghz ?
Recommended by who? AMD recommends just leave it in AUTO, which would effectively limit the overclock to something 'safe'. But then, being safe isn't what overclocking is about, is it?

So if you want to be bold: AMD's specc'd operating range for Ryzen 3000 is .2-1.5 (yes 1.5) V. So as long as you can keep temperatures in check (with aftermarket cooling) that's as high as you could theoretically go. But you should not need anything close to it for 4.0 Ghz so start no higher (maybe 1.45-1.475 V) then back it down, testing for stability till you find what yours needs.

Hopefully you'll end up at 1.39-1.41V but All CPU's are different. That's why you need to find what YOURS needs and not ask others what worked for them.

What benefits do YOU hope to see in gaming FPS? By most accounts, whatever benefits you WILL see are so small they can only be detected running gaming benchmarks and not while playing. That hardly makes it worth the effort, IMO. In other words: do it because you enjoy knowing the CPU's wound up tight and delivering all it can as that's really the only reward you'll get for it.
 
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Reactions: rokon500

Gmoney06ss

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It seems the new 3xxx series aren't the best overclocking chips. And from I've seen you actually get better results from just turning on PBO and letting the chip boost itself. Seems like that way it will actually hold a higher boost clock than manually overclocking. But you could definitely still try a manual.

What are the rest of your specs? Psu? Cooler?

And as pc tailor said, what are you trying to accomplish?
 

PC Tailor

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Herald
Not necessarily.

I'm not sure what you mean by the AMD bit :LOL:

AMD did a pretty good job in getting a stable good performance out of the turbo boost on the 3rd Gen Ryzen - especially the 3600 and 3600X to the point where overclocking was basically negigible and can potentially just lead to instability.

You can OC using Ryzen Master if you so wish, especially if you're newer to overclocking. But again, you probably won't mind much difference. it can be quite difficult to get any results on an all core OC.

You could also consider this as a quick reference: https://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/amd-ryzen-5-3600-review,26.html - important thing if you do overclock is to just take it in incremental steps and back track if you hit any instability.

Also make sure you have a good quality PSU.
 
Jul 22, 2019
10
0
10
0
R5 3600
antec c400
b450 aorus pro
8x2 ddr4 3200mhz
rtx 2060 super
650w gold PSU
Thanks for helping.
I just wanna how can i get up to 4Ghz-4.2Ghz speeds cuz bios isn't the only way right ?
 

PC Tailor

Distinguished
Herald
R5 3600
antec c400
b450 aorus pro
8x2 ddr4 3200mhz
rtx 2060 super
650w gold PSU
Thanks for helping.
I just wanna how can i get up to 4Ghz-4.2Ghz speeds cuz bios isn't the only way right ?
No, but BIOS is arguably the most suitable way.
There is no one answer to how to get up to a speed, every chip is completely different, it's all about gradually increasing and testing, and checking your temperature headroom.

As I said, just bear in mind you will probably find it difficult to get much performance difference on an all core overclock, especially in gaming.
 
It does give some benefits in fps in gaming.
what is the recommended voltage for let's say 4Ghz ?
Recommended by who? AMD recommends just leave it in AUTO, which would effectively limit the overclock to something 'safe'. But then, being safe isn't what overclocking is about, is it?

So if you want to be bold: AMD's specc'd operating range for Ryzen 3000 is .2-1.5 (yes 1.5) V. So as long as you can keep temperatures in check (with aftermarket cooling) that's as high as you could theoretically go. But you should not need anything close to it for 4.0 Ghz so start no higher (maybe 1.45-1.475 V) then back it down, testing for stability till you find what yours needs.

Hopefully you'll end up at 1.39-1.41V but All CPU's are different. That's why you need to find what YOURS needs and not ask others what worked for them.

What benefits do YOU hope to see in gaming FPS? By most accounts, whatever benefits you WILL see are so small they can only be detected running gaming benchmarks and not while playing. That hardly makes it worth the effort, IMO. In other words: do it because you enjoy knowing the CPU's wound up tight and delivering all it can as that's really the only reward you'll get for it.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: rokon500
Jul 22, 2019
10
0
10
0
Recommended by who? AMD recommends just leave it in AUTO, which would effectively limit the overclock to something 'safe'. But then, being safe isn't what overclocking is about, is it?

So if you want to be bold: AMD's specc'd operating range for Ryzen 3000 is .2-1.5 (yes 1.5) V. So as long as you can keep temperatures in check (with aftermarket cooling) that's as high as you could theoretically go. But you should not need anything close to it for 4.0 Ghz so start no higher (maybe 1.45-1.475 V) then back it down, testing for stability till you find what yours needs.

Hopefully you'll end up at 1.39-1.41V but All CPU's are different. That's why you need to find what YOURS needs and not ask others what worked for them.

What benefits do YOU hope to see in gaming FPS? By most accounts, whatever benefits you WILL see are so small they can only be detected running gaming benchmarks and not while playing. That hardly makes it worth the effort, IMO. In other words: do it because you enjoy knowing the CPU's wound up tight and delivering all it can as that's really the only reward you'll get for it.
thank you :D
 

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