[SOLVED] Ryzen 5 3600 Power Plan

Dec 12, 2019
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I got Ryzen 5 3600 with stock cooler, MSI B450 Tomahawk MAX, 2 sticks of 8 GB 3000 Mhz RAM.

I don't want high temperatures during idle because I want my system to be silent while I'm working. On the other hand, I want to get the best performance while gaming therefore I don't know which power plan I should use.
 
Absolutely be sure your BIOS is up-to-date and you're running the latest chipset drivers from AMD website. And run the Ryzen Balanced power plan, it lets the processor pull back at idle as it should. You want Ryzen managing it's boosting and idling, not Windows, as it does so much better and at 1 mS intervals. This is a key enabling feature of Zen 2's efficiency.

Also make a few settings changes in BIOS:

Set Cool-n-Quiet to Enabled
Set Core CPPC to Enabled
Set CPPC Preferred Cores to Enabled
Set Advanced C-States to Enabled

Don't leave them in Auto or Default because many mobo mfr's don't set them to correct default values.

Getting a better heatsink definitely helps but whichever you use don't leave fan profiles at default as they pulse with processor boosting. Set a speed that is barely audible (or sub-audible) up to about 65-70C or so and ramp fans up from there.
 
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I got Ryzen 5 3600 with stock cooler, MSI B450 Tomahawk MAX, 2 sticks of 8 GB 3000 Mhz RAM.

I don't want high temperatures during idle because I want my system to be silent while I'm working. On the other hand, I want to get the best performance while gaming therefore I don't know which power plan I should use.
Get a good cooler?
 
Thanks for the wise advise. This is not a cooler question if you can read. Why would the cpu get full voltage for full performance while idle, which power plan is the best for both low load and performance.
Wisdom with Ryzen is just set it high performance and be done with it. But seriously you should get a cooler they cost like £20-30.
 

DMAN999

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Wisdom with Ryzen is just set it high performance and be done with it.
But seriously you should get a cooler they cost like £20-30.
I absolutely would NOT advise he use the High Performance Power plan.
The AMD Ryzen Balanced plan will let his CPU downclock at idle and under light load and Max out under heavier loads.

And a good 4 or 6 pipe aftermarket cooler ($40 - $60 range) will help keep temps down but really isn't necessary.
 
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I absolutely would NOT advise he use the High Performance Power plan.
The AMD Ryzen Balanced plan will let his CPU downclock at idle and under light load and Max out under heavier loads.

And a good 4 or 6 pipe aftermarket cooler ($40 - $60 range) will help keep temps down but really isn't necessary.
If you want it to be quiet it is....
The balanced plan kneecaps it though, doesn’t play well with Ryzen.
 
Absolutely be sure your BIOS is up-to-date and you're running the latest chipset drivers from AMD website. And run the Ryzen Balanced power plan, it lets the processor pull back at idle as it should. You want Ryzen managing it's boosting and idling, not Windows, as it does so much better and at 1 mS intervals. This is a key enabling feature of Zen 2's efficiency.

Also make a few settings changes in BIOS:

Set Cool-n-Quiet to Enabled
Set Core CPPC to Enabled
Set CPPC Preferred Cores to Enabled
Set Advanced C-States to Enabled

Don't leave them in Auto or Default because many mobo mfr's don't set them to correct default values.

Getting a better heatsink definitely helps but whichever you use don't leave fan profiles at default as they pulse with processor boosting. Set a speed that is barely audible (or sub-audible) up to about 65-70C or so and ramp fans up from there.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: Lakra_ and DMAN999
Dec 12, 2019
5
0
10
0
Absolutely be sure your BIOS is up-to-date and you're running the latest chipset drivers from AMD website. And run the Ryzen Balanced power plan, it lets the processor pull back at idle as it should. You want Ryzen managing it's boosting and idling, not Windows, as it does so much better and at 1 mS intervals. This is a key enabling feature of Zen 2's efficiency.

Also make a few settings changes in BIOS:

Set Cool-n-Quiet to Enabled
Set Core CPPC to Enabled
Set CPPC Preferred Cores to Enabled
Set Advanced C-States to Enabled

Don't leave them in Auto or Default because many mobo mfr's don't set them to correct default values.

Getting a better heatsink definitely helps but whichever you use don't leave fan profiles at default as they pulse with processor boosting. Set a speed that is barely audible (or sub-audible) up to about 65-70C or so and ramp fans up from there.
Can you please explain those settings individually? I tried to search it online but I could not understand them exactly except Cool-n-Quiet.
 
Can you please explain those settings individually? I tried to search it online but I could not understand them exactly except Cool-n-Quiet.
C-States is the term designers use for processor 'sleep' states for reduced power consumption. There are several and refer to how many parts of the processor can turn off in idle periods. Setting 'Advanced' just tells BIOS to enable pretty much all of them for the processor to manage itself.

Cool-n-Quiet is AMD's earliest term for pulling back CPU clocks in idle periods, much revised in the modern era in ways I've never seen explained.

CPPC refers to Collaborative Processor Performance Control, which is the term used to describe Zen 2's new power saving and core performance boosting method that works with Windows' own thread scheduling and power management .

CPPC Enable Preferred Cores instructs the processor to boost preferred cores higher and longer. CPPC is a co-ordinated effort between the processor and newer Windows releases (1909).

CPPC works with the OS in that Windows' scheduler, with newer releases, has become aware of the topology of newer processors; specifically which cores share which resources, e.g., L2 and L3 caches. So when you enable these settings the processor tells the OS which cores are the 'best' so it can then make a determine which are the 'preferred' cores based on resources shared by the 'best' cores. The processor will then be able to respond by boosting cores (according to it's boosting algorithm that looks at voltage/power/temperature) when the OS scheduler logically loads them with execution threads.

Taken together, these settings enable the processor to effectively use the most capable cores to boost to higher frequencies as the OS loads them up with threads to execute. And the scheduler can also now move threads as needed (done to spread the thermal load across the processor among other reasons) to another core that shares resources with no performance penalty. But more, it also tells the processor to use all it's power conserving features to idle cores and parts of cores when not executing.

I believe enabling CPPC also tells the OS to turn over power management control to the processor, but not sure about that.

With everything properly enabled you'll be able to see the preferred cores hitting max rated clocks far more frequently and core voltage pulling back to low levels in idle periods. Zen2 makes the idle-or-boost decisions very rapidly, up to once every .01 second, which is much faster than previously or with Window's PM. This is also why running the Ryzen power plans are much preferred, since Zen2 operating on that 1mS cycle can manage it's power consumption far more effectively than Windows can with it's older, processor agnostic, power plan approach.

I hope I got it all right, i'm sure somebody will correct what I didn't.
An interesting Tom's article that may help to explain some more/better:
https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-no-windows-scheduler-isnt-selecting-wrong-ryzen-3000-cores-to-boost
 
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