Hey! I have a question.
My r5 5600x in game jumps all over frequencies.
...
That's the way Ryzen works...it will lowers clocks whenever it can to reduce power consumption. Does it much faster than monitoring utilities can track so what you're seeing isn't very good representation of what's really happening.

To be certain it doesn't interfere with game performance install the AMD CPU / chipset drivers and get them from the AMD web site, no where else not even those from your motherboard mfr. Run whatever power plan it installs using the settings AMD uses since it's meant to work best with your Ryzen processor.
 
Reactions: kurdtnz
This looks more like the overlay is bugged because it's showing the same clock speed for every core. By default AMD cores do not share the same clock; i.e., the cores can be independently clocked.

But otherwise yes, it's normal for clock speeds to fluctuate like that.
 
Reactions: kurdtnz
Sep 10, 2021
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This looks more like the overlay is bugged because it's showing the same clock speed for every core. By default AMD cores do not share the same clock; i.e., the cores can be independently clocked.

But otherwise yes, it's normal for clock speeds to fluctuate like that.
I saw some ppl doing benchmarks with the same MSI afterburner overlay and there was no jumps like that.
Settings minimum procesor % in power plan makes no change either.
Thats strange for me, installed chipset drivers from AMD, nothing changed.
 
It was prebuild, asus rog strix g15dk.
I uninstalled all ASUS apps, chipset is B550.
I guess that explains it at least.

Just uninstalling Asus apps wasn't enough in my case. I made the mistake of installing them with my new B550m TUF plus, then uninstalled. They left behind several services and something else that would re-register and set them to start back up the next time the system booted up.

I found a setting in BIOS that would trigger it and disabled it. Then I wound up doing a clean re-install of Windows, which was easier than hacking at the registry to get rid of everything and rid the system completely.
 
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Sep 10, 2021
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I guess that explains it at least.

Just uninstalling Asus apps wasn't enough in my case. I made the mistake of installing them with my new B550m TUF plus, then uninstalled. They left behind several services and something else that would re-register and set them to start back up the next time the system booted up.

I found a setting in BIOS that would trigger it and disabled it. Then I wound up doing a clean re-install of Windows, which was easier than hacking at the registry, to get rid of everything to rid the system completely.
After making sure all asus crap is gone, and updating drivers from AMD i got that...

After 2 hour long gaming session max temp was 78, is it allright?
 
After making sure all asus crap is gone, and updating drivers from AMD i got that...
....
After 2 hour long gaming session max temp was 78, is it allright?
I'd be happy with that, especially since that 78C MAX temperature is probably a transient 'spike' that's not very relevant. Ryzen is very aggressive about boosting when it needs to and the temp will spike when it does. But it can't hold that kind of boost very long (and doesn't really need to with games) so it pulls back which keeps average temperature in check. You have to look at the AVERAGE temperature to gain a meaningful understanding of the CPU's thermal state across a period of time; in particular the AVERAGE of AVERAGES that HWInfo64 shows you.
 
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Sep 10, 2021
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I'd be happy with that, especially since that 78C MAX temperature is probably a transient 'spike' that's not very relevant. Ryzen is very aggressive about boosting when it needs to and the temp will spike when it does. But it can't hold that kind of boost very long (and doesn't really need to with games) so it pulls back which keeps average temperature in check. You have to look at the AVERAGE temperature to gain a meaningful understanding of the CPU's thermal state across a period of time; in particular the AVERAGE of AVERAGES that HWInfo64 shows you.
Average is 48.7 on hottest core.
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler
What was the lowest core average?

What's really interesting is to pull the core temps out into graphs on the desktop. Then also pull the core clocks and thread utilization. Now play the game a few minutes and go look at those graphs, comparing each core's temperatures to it's utilization and clocks as it boosts.

You'll quickly get a picture of which cores the scheduler prefers. But, if the game is a sufficiently thread- heavy load, you'll also get an idea of how it shifts the processing among cores as they heat up. That's why it's not really true to say more cores can't help even with gaming. More cores means the work can be spread around better to limit heating and keep them boosting higher, longer.

When doing analysis like this, be sure to set up HWINfo right:
 

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