[SOLVED] Ryzen 5 CPU Wraith Spire Fan Installation Question on ATX Gigabyte Motherboard

joshepherd12

Prominent
Jul 15, 2018
4
0
520
2
Hello,

I'd be grateful in advance for some guidance please. I have a few questions about installing the CPU fan my Gigabyte motherboard.

Build is:

Gigabyte Aorus B450 Pro Wifi
Ryzen 5 3400G with Wraith Spire fan

By the Ryzen instructions, I removed the 2 CPU brackets and put in the CPU. When I got to the Wraith Spire, I attempted to fasten it into the 4 empty holes that held the brackets. It doesn't seem to be fastening to the motherboard as I expected so I'm unsure of how this goes.

The Ryzen installation pamphlet is confusing, showing like I should put the 2 plastic brackets back in and put the fan on top. If so, the bracket screws aren't going back in like they came out. (The instructions look like you take out the brackets and put them back in - don't know why?)

Question: Is the fan supposed to go directly into the empty holes? (Maybe I should apply more pressure?)

Question: If the brackets are to be used, do I start the screws on the backplate instead of the top? (The screws aren't going back in too easily. (Apply more pressure?)

I apologize if I sound ignorant, but I haven't built a pc in a long time and things have certainly changed.

Thanks for your help.
 

joshepherd12

Prominent
Jul 15, 2018
4
0
520
2
Do take the plastic brackets off and do not put them back on, but do leave the backplate in place. The cooler mounting screws will thread into the threaded posts on the backplate that protrude through the motherboard. Save the brackets and screws, you may need them later if you change coolers.

You're pushing against springs to get the mounting screws to mate with the threaded posts, so it will take a little effort. Get all four screws started before tightening. At this point it's very good to have the motherboard sitting on a firm surface, like a table with a towel on top of it. In the case is also OK, but have it mounted with all the screws in standoffs and tightened so it won't move around.

Then, because you're also tightening against the springs, the effort to turn the screw will be a bit harder than you might think. When the screw bottoms, and effort goes way up, is when it's tight enough so stop.
I started to do that, but I backed off when I thought I was applying too much pressure. (I have the motherboard mounted securely in the case, and the case is on a flat surface, grounded mat.)

You really helped me! Thank you so much for your answer.

PS Computers have changed a lot over the years. ("I don't think I'm in Kansas anymore.")
 
Last edited:
Do take the plastic brackets off and do not put them back on, but do leave the backplate in place. The cooler mounting screws will thread into the threaded posts on the backplate that protrude through the motherboard. Save the brackets and screws, you may need them later if you change coolers.

You're pushing against springs to get the mounting screws to mate with the threaded posts, so it will take a little effort. Get all four screws started before tightening. At this point it's very good to have the motherboard sitting on a firm surface, like a table with a towel on top of it. In the case is also OK, but have it mounted with all the screws in standoffs and tightened so it won't move around.

Then, because you're also tightening against the springs, the effort to turn the screw will be a bit harder than you might think. When the screw bottoms, and effort goes way up, is when it's tight enough so stop.
 
Last edited:

joshepherd12

Prominent
Jul 15, 2018
4
0
520
2
Do take the plastic brackets off and do not put them back on, but do leave the backplate in place. The cooler mounting screws will thread into the threaded posts on the backplate that protrude through the motherboard. Save the brackets and screws, you may need them later if you change coolers.

You're pushing against springs to get the mounting screws to mate with the threaded posts, so it will take a little effort. Get all four screws started before tightening. At this point it's very good to have the motherboard sitting on a firm surface, like a table with a towel on top of it. In the case is also OK, but have it mounted with all the screws in standoffs and tightened so it won't move around.

Then, because you're also tightening against the springs, the effort to turn the screw will be a bit harder than you might think. When the screw bottoms, and effort goes way up, is when it's tight enough so stop.
I started to do that, but I backed off when I thought I was applying too much pressure. (I have the motherboard mounted securely in the case, and the case is on a flat surface, grounded mat.)

You really helped me! Thank you so much for your answer.

PS Computers have changed a lot over the years. ("I don't think I'm in Kansas anymore.")
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS