Question Ryzen 5600X fails?

Aug 4, 2022
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Hey everybody. So I decided to upgrade.

New parts:
Ryzen 5 5600X
Corsair vengeance 16gb 3600 oc
Gigabyte b550 Gaming x v2 with f15 bios (requires f10 for ryzen 5600X)
Corsair psu bronze 750watt.

Kept:
Sapphire R590 nitro plus
Soundblaster Gaming.
Western digital 3d 500gb( Disk formatted and empty )

Motherboard sees all components (cpu, ram, hdd, flash drive etc) although ram speed is shown as 2666.

Gigabyte logo is shown correctly and I enter bios normally. Problem is whenever I try to install new os (win 10 home) whether it comes with cd or flash drive, PC goes black screen and / or reboots.

Tried the hdd on another computer and works fine. Tried another PSU and same thing happens. Gpu works as well. Also tried a few boot changes (1st DVD or flash drive or no DVD at all or another disk) , same result.

Took the whole PC to have it checked and they told me that they tried 3600x CPU on it and works fine so maybe the 5600x is faulty. Gigabytes site says that the motherboard is OK with Ryzen 5600x. They also told me to start connecting each component in turn, ie only cpu with gpu, then 1 memory, then second etc.

Is there anything else to try in order to avoid to send back the CPU? Rolling back bios from f15 to f10, which is the minimum version to run, would help?

Thanks in advance!
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Ryzen 5 5600X
Corsair vengeance 16gb 3600 oc
Gigabyte b550 Gaming x v2 with f15 bios (requires f10 for ryzen 5600X)
Corsair psu bronze 750watt.

^ if these are new parts, what were the parts that they replaced?

Corsair is the brand of the PSU while 750W is the advertised wattage of the unit, ;likewise Bronze is the advertised 80+ efficiency rating. Model to the PSU?

I would advise against a BIOS downgrade. In fact, you state being of F15, according to your motherboard support site, there are two F15's listed under BIOS, which one are you on?

Where did you source the installer for your OS?
 
Hey everybody. So I decided to upgrade.

New parts:
Ryzen 5 5600X
Corsair vengeance 16gb 3600 oc
Gigabyte b550 Gaming x v2 with f15 bios (requires f10 for ryzen 5600X)
Corsair psu bronze 750watt.

Kept:
Sapphire R590 nitro plus
Soundblaster Gaming.
Western digital 3d 500gb( Disk formatted and empty )

Motherboard sees all components (cpu, ram, hdd, flash drive etc) although ram speed is shown as 2666.

Gigabyte logo is shown correctly and I enter bios normally. Problem is whenever I try to install new os (win 10 home) whether it comes with cd or flash drive, PC goes black screen and / or reboots.

Tried the hdd on another computer and works fine. Tried another PSU and same thing happens. Gpu works as well. Also tried a few boot changes (1st DVD or flash drive or no DVD at all or another disk) , same result.

Took the whole PC to have it checked and they told me that they tried 3600x CPU on it and works fine so maybe the 5600x is faulty. Gigabytes site says that the motherboard is OK with Ryzen 5600x. They also told me to start connecting each component in turn, ie only cpu with gpu, then 1 memory, then second etc.

Is there anything else to try in order to avoid to send back the CPU? Rolling back bios from f15 to f10, which is the minimum version to run, would help?

Thanks in advance!
Did you ever reset CMOS or revert to default settings in BIOS?
 
Reactions: logainofhades
Aug 4, 2022
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Motherboard has f15a bios version.

Psu is corsair CV series 750watt.

Have resetted bios to default.

Could it be possible the CPU be faulty, even if I see it in bios settings?
 
Motherboard has f15a bios version.

Psu is corsair CV series 750watt.

Have resetted bios to default.

Could it be possible the CPU be faulty, even if I see it in bios settings?
It is of course possible. When in BIOS and the initial phases of Windows installation the CPU's not using any advanced operating modes so only a tiny fraction of it's circuitry is being exercised; probably only a single CPU core even. At some point in the install it switches to enhanced modes and enables other capabilities so it makes sense it could be defective. But even so it's wise to exhaust all other possibilities first since a DOA, brand new CPU is extremely rare.

What did you find when you used each memory stick alone and in different DIMM socket? If it works with one DIMM in any socket then it obviously points to the one DIMM that doesn't work. If it works with any DIMM in two of the sockets but not in the other two then it points to a defect in the CPU's IMC.

The PSU may be of low(er) quality but it is brand new. I have to think it would at least let you get Windows installed but fall flat when the GPU starts pulling a lot of power...unless it was flat out defective. You've also tried with another PSU with no luck. It might be nice to go swap it for a better model but it's muc less likely to be the problem,

Personally, the BIOS revision isn't the issue for this. It's probably good to update to 15d, but it should not hinder your ability to install Windows. Reset CMOS again...in fact, pull the battery for a half hour or so while shorting the pins, power off and disconnected from the wall. It's really important to get the CPU to properly train memory before installing Windows this is the way to make that happen. Do not make any changes to BIOS settings, e.g., enabling XMP, after you reset CMOS and initiate your Windows install.
 
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Reactions: King_V
Aug 4, 2022
7
0
10
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It is of course possible. When in BIOS and the initial phases of Windows installation the CPU's not using any advanced operating modes so only a tiny fraction of it's circuitry is being exercised; probably only a single CPU core even. At some point in the install it switches to enhanced modes and enables other capabilities so it makes sense it could be defective. But even so it's wise to exhaust all other possibilities first since a DOA, brand new CPU is extremely rare.

What did you find when you used each memory stick alone and in different DIMM socket? If it works with one DIMM in any socket then it obviously points to the one DIMM that doesn't work. If it works with any DIMM in two of the sockets but not in the other two then it points to a defect in the CPU's IMC.

The PSU may be of low(er) quality but it is brand new. I have to think it would at least let you get Windows installed but fall flat when the GPU starts pulling a lot of power...unless it was flat out defective. You've also tried with another PSU with no luck. It might be nice to go swap it for a better model but it's muc less likely to be the problem,

Personally, the BIOS revision isn't the issue for this. It's probably good to update to 15d, but it should not hinder your ability to install Windows. Reset CMOS again...in fact, pull the battery for a half hour or so while shorting the pins, power off and disconnected from the wall. It's really important to get the CPU to properly train memory before installing Windows this is the way to make that happen. Do not make any changes to BIOS settings, e.g., enabling XMP, after you reset CMOS and initiate your Windows install.

Well to be honest, haven't tried to pull battery our, what's more, remove the pins because I thought a brand new motherboard would be pointless to do.

Man, from what I've seen so far in these forums or YouTube, new motherboards may need a lot more tests and swaps in order to get them properly working. People getting frustrated.

Still I won't give up until I return it as defective.
 
... remove the pins because I thought a brand new motherboard would be pointless to do.

Man, from what I've seen so far in these forums or YouTube, new motherboards may need a lot more tests and swaps in order to get them properly working. People getting frustrated.....
Do you men 'short the pins' instead of 'remove the pins'? I hope so.

I agree, it's a bit more difficult to get new systems up and running. In my experience it's DDR4 and how the CPU's IMC interacts with it. It's far more complicated and unforgiving than DDR3 was. But if you follow certain protocols (like resetting CMOS to force a re-train) it's a bit easier to achieve success.

As hardware advances and gets more finicky it may also be getting more complicated to DIY your PC build. But it's still a far cry from what it was when I started out. Bit-mapped jumper blocks to select everything from CPU core voltage, clocks, memory speeds, timing, IRQ's and port addresses for each I/O, swapping crystal oscillators to change CPU clock speed, selecting D-RAM chips of proper size/speed and plugging them in. It was super complicated and one mistake it just stares at you with no clues...or worse, clues you with smoke coming out of the part you just screwed up.

IMO frustration is part of it, especially when learning new tech. So it's best to keep cool, explain the situation clearly, ask questions and try another approach.
 
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