Question ryzen 5800x getting super hot

Nov 27, 2021
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CPU: r7 5800x
Motherboard: msi meg x570 ace
Ram:64gb 3200mhz corsair vengeance
SSD/HDD: 5tb ssd / 1tb hdd
GPU: msi rtx 3080ti suprim x
PSU : corsair 850w
Chassis: thermaltake view 51
OS: windows 10

okay so i have the ryzen 7 5800x in a full custom loop 2x360mm radiator 14 fan setup and if i stress test at stock voltage it overheats and shuts down my pc and if i reduce voltage to 1.25v and clock to 4200 its good but still gets up into the 80 degree area while gaming
im still pretty new to this stuff but i have tried changing the thermal paste and reseating the cpu block i dunno what else to try
 

Karadjgne

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How is the loop set up. What components. What's the flow direction. How are the fans setup. That loop, if set up correctly, should be @ 800ish watts of capacity for components that'd be hard pushed to see about 500w, so there's plenty of space. A couple of good pictures will tell a better story, because I'm betting that there's an issue with the loop itself.
 
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Nov 27, 2021
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its a corsair hydro x set up goes pump to gpu to rad to cpu to rad to pump.
fans are front; intake
bottom; intake
side;intake
rear; exhaust
top; exhaust
 
... if i stress test at stock voltage it overheats and shuts down my pc and if i reduce voltage to 1.25v and clock to 4200 its good but still gets up into the 80 degree area while gaming
...
By stock voltage do you mean AUTO? there is no stock fixed voltage for Ryzen as AMD STRONGLY recommends leaving it in AUTO so it can lower voltage to keep the CPU cooler...and safe.

Otherwise, it's perfectly normal, and by design, for 5800's to register up to 90C temperatures so into the 80's isn't so bad even for great cooling. HWInfo CPU information tells me my 5800X has a high temp clock limit of 4800Mhz at 85C.

Fixed voltage/frequency overclocks will run hotter with no real performance improvement. Try using PBO and undervolting with curve optimizer. It leaves the algorithm in full control so it's still driving to it's specified temperature limits but it does so with lower voltage so it can hit a higher clocks. You can even customize the curve for each core separately.

I don't think mine is particularly a well tweaked curve but my 5800X runs all cores at 4800-4900 (when needed, of course) while gaming...Cyberpunk 2077, a pretty CPU intensive title....with temps in mid 60's to low 70's under a 240mm AIO. It will run Cinebench all-core encoding at 4750-4775 all day long with temps 78-80C.

One thing to observe: it looks like both your GPU and CPU are cooled by the same loop. I know 3080's and 3090's are down right furnaces and will throw massive amounts of heat into the loop in heavy gaming. So while dual 360's means a huge water volume and massive dissipation I still wonder of the GPU's just warming up the liquid while gaming and that could limit the cooling the CPU sees. Dunno what to do about it, though, aside from separate loops...means fitting another reservoir/pump unit.
 
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Nighthawk117

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Sep 27, 2021
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CPU: r7 5800x
Motherboard: msi meg x570 ace
Ram:64gb 3200mhz corsair vengeance
SSD/HDD: 5tb ssd / 1tb hdd
GPU: msi rtx 3080ti suprim x
PSU : corsair 850w
Chassis: thermaltake view 51
OS: windows 10

okay so i have the ryzen 7 5800x in a full custom loop 2x360mm radiator 14 fan setup and if i stress test at stock voltage it overheats and shuts down my pc and if i reduce voltage to 1.25v and clock to 4200 its good but still gets up into the 80 degree area while gaming
im still pretty new to this stuff but i have tried changing the thermal paste and reseating the cpu block i dunno what else to try
The 5800X out of the box is an extremely hot chip anyway, 90C is common for this CPU.

As for your options, you can undervolt the CPU with curve optimiser as the above posted suggested, probably the most ideal solution in terms of preserving performance. Otherwise some people leave all the voltage stuff on auto and enable Eco mode without seemingly losing much performance.
 

Karadjgne

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If you look through the holes in the cpu block, one side has a triangular looking jetplate, the other sees the edge of the microfins. The microfins side is the outlet. If you got that backwards, you'll get some funky temps.

As it looks right now, from inlet/outlet, if you didn't flip the block 180° when installing, they are backwards. Standard block orientation out of the box has inlet on the right.

Wattage energy released into a liquid volume isn't temps. Contrary to popular belief, a 3080/3090 doesn't do all that much to a cooling loop, it takes a massive amount of energy to raise a loop even 1°C. If loop temp at the pump is 30°C, and after hitting the gpu its 34°C, that's still just 34°C hitting the cpu, which is still far below the case ambient temps of an aircooler. Running a loop under duress for several hours might see the loop get into the 40's, but that's still below aircooling and well below the cpu/gpu temps.

You can take a sink full of cold water, dump in a cup of boiling water, it's not really going to change anything. As long as the dissipation of that energy equals or exceeds the energy input, you could turn on the hot water tap full blast and the sink water will never get any warmer, regardless of hot water temp or energy contained.
 
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If loop temp at the pump is 30°C, and after hitting the gpu its 34°C, that's still just 34°C hitting the cpu
...
I'm well aware the difference between temperature and heat energy...one being measured in degrees C/F/K your choice, the other measured in BTU/KCal/Ergs/Joules, your choice among many others.

But if the water hitting the CPU is now 4 degrees warmer it's the same as ambient air being 4 degrees warmer when talking about air cooling. It's lost up to 4 degrees of cooling effectiveness with an efficient water block.

When I put a 120mm AIO in a very small case I mounted the radiator in the rear and oriented to exhaust, a conventional arrangement. I had a bear of a time cooling the CPU when gaming since the entire heat load from a lowly RX480 was exhausting through it. I was pretty much resigned to the 120mm AIO being a bad idea until I thought to turn everything around by reversing airflow through the case. So now it intakes through the rear mounted radiator and exhausts out the front. I was rather amazed how much better the CPU cooled with temps 7-8 degrees cooler in Cinebench. But of course, that's because it was using 25C outside air instead of 30C (after mixing with front intake air) GPU exhaust air. The GPU didn't seem to mind, so that's the way it is now. CPU comfortable, GPU comfortable, even working F@H when both are working hard.
 
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M3rKn

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Nov 13, 2019
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goes pump to gpu to rad to cpu to rad to pump.
You can try reversing the flow. Tackle this however you choose, but I can give some advise.

It doesn't matter which comes first in the loop, it can be GPU/CPU or vise versa. Water blocks have inlet and outlets, which kinda matter, but at the same time most say it has no real effect.

Your block is mounted correctly, right side is inlet, left side is outlet.
GPU blocks are reverse, left is inlet, and right is outlet.

I have provided a high quality illustration ;), run new tubing. At the outlet of the bottom of your pump run a new tube up to your vertically mounted rad. The inlet at the top of your reservoir, run a new tube to the outlet on your GPU block. This is a starting point. At least your CPU will get the best cooling, vs getting the GPUs sloppy seconds.

 

Karadjgne

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Look closer. Gpu block is universal i/o. From gpu upto the rad. Out of the rad into cpu block on the left , outlet is on the right. From there it goes to other rad, then reservoir. If that cpu block is backwards to the flow , jetplate on the right as standard orientation, Op will get lousy cooling as the coolant isn't forced through the fins, but follows the path of least restriction above the fins. Your labeling is backwards. The pump outlet is on the bottom, which is correct, but gpu inlet is in the front top right, outlet is on the front top left upto the rad.
 

aznbull

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I'll suggest you try to run your CPU with a negative offset first to see if it helps with the temperature. You can also combine negative offset and PBO with negative in the curve optimizer.
 

M3rKn

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Nov 13, 2019
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gpu inlet is in the front top right, outlet is on the front top left upto the rad.
If what you say is correct then just disregard the inlet/outlet lables on the GPU. If the GPU block doesn't have a fixed inlet/outlet then the orientation doesn't matter. The OP would still need to swap the inlet and outlet direction from the reservoir/pump (which is the only thing I suggested). The reservoir is fixed inlet/outlet and the current setup is forcing water through the GPU first, and then through the CPU block outlet, and out of the CPU block inlet back into the loop.
 

Karadjgne

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Liquid comes out the bottom of the pump, goes to a T with a drain plug, then upto gpu block. I/O is universal on the gpu block. Then goes to top rad, and to cpu block. That's where my question is. If the cpu block is mounted normally, the inlet will be on the right, the jetplate side. Outlet would be on the left. The cpu block can be rotated in any direction, even 45° if necessary. OP has piped inlet on the left, so Should have rotated the cpu block 180° to maintain correct flow. If Op did not, he's putting flow into the outlet side, which will result is restricted flow past the jetplate and not forcing the liquid through the microfins, negating much of the cpu blocks ability to absorb heat from the cpu.

Loop order doesn't make any real difference once liquid is acclimated. Doesn't matter both rads after gpu/cpu or split rads with cpu first. It's all the same volume of liquid and will retain its absorbtion ability according to loop temp and volume, not proximity.
 
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Nov 27, 2021
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hey guys sorry for no reply for a few days and thanks for all your suggestions.
i believe i have fixed the problem for now by making the front an exhaust and removing the glass panels as they were restricting airflow. my coolant temps were getting to 50 degrees celsius plus now at a constant 35 degrees with ambient being around 28 today.
i thing long term what im going to do is 3d print a couple of panels to replace the glass ones to aid with airflow

thanks again
 
Nov 27, 2021
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also about the corsair cpu block being backwards i turned it around before i installed it so coolant is traveling the correct way as per manual
 

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