Question Ryzen 5800x good voltage

alphadogg123

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So I just got a 5800x and have fitted it to my Asus x370 pro. Stock settings are way too hot for my bequiet dark rock(not pro) and under a stress test it shoots to 90c then throttles to 4.1ghz(ish).

I think the asus voltage profile has too much voltage I’ve managed to run it stable with a negative offset of 0.6V but it’s still showing a max of 1.4 something volts in cpuz. Any pointers of what absolute voltages are stable on my cpu?
 
So I just got a 5800x and have fitted it to my Asus x370 pro. Stock settings are way too hot for my bequiet dark rock(not pro) and under a stress test it shoots to 90c then throttles to 4.1ghz(ish).

I think the asus voltage profile has too much voltage I’ve managed to run it stable with a negative offset of 0.6V but it’s still showing a max of 1.4 something volts in cpuz. Any pointers of what absolute voltages are stable on my cpu?
It's perfectly normal to jump as high as 1.5V...maybe even a bit more very briefly...when the processor is reaching for it's highest rated boosts. There are no 'stable' voltages though...it jumps around very aggressively under any sort of useage, between 1.0V (actually much lower) and 1.5V depending on process load and temperature. The proper way to undervolt is with Curve Optimizer. CO lowers voltage at the mid-high end of the V/F curve.

It's also perfectly normal...and expected... for Ryzen 5000's to reach 90C in use. Better cooling pays off though as it won't pull clocks back so soon or as far. 4100Mhz is not 'throttling' yet, but it is pulling clocks. Base clock... the clock speed you could expect to see if you had really poor cooling... is 3800Mhz. Under an extremely heavy all core workload you can expect the CPU to hold clocks in the 4200-4300 range when properly cooled (mid 80's).

A lot of how-to vids on Youtube for setting up PBO2 and Curve Optimizer:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfkrp25dpQ0
 
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alphadogg123

Distinguished
Jul 14, 2009
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18,665
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It's perfectly normal to jump as high as 1.5V...maybe even a bit more very briefly...when the processor is reaching for it's highest rated boosts. There are no 'stable' voltages though...it jumps around very aggressively under any sort of useage, between 1.0V (actually much lower) and 1.5V depending on process load and temperature. The proper way to undervolt is with Curve Optimizer. CO lowers voltage at the mid-high end of the V/F curve.

It's also perfectly normal...and expected... for Ryzen 5000's to reach 90C in use. Better cooling pays off though as it won't pull clocks back so soon or as far. 4100Mhz is not 'throttling' yet, but it is pulling clocks. Base clock... the clock speed you could expect to see if you had really poor cooling... is 3800Mhz. Under an extremely heavy all core workload you can expect the CPU to hold clocks in the 4200-4300 range when properly cooled (mid 80's).

A lot of how-to vids on Youtube for setting up PBO2 and Curve Optimizer:

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfkrp25dpQ0
Right I get voltage jumps around depending on load but I’m sure there’s max values. I’m also unsure of the x370 capabilities like I’ve not seen anything that says pbo2 in bios as it was designed with the 1000 series.
 
Right I get voltage jumps around depending on load but I’m sure there’s max values. I’m also unsure of the x370 capabilities like I’ve not seen anything that says pbo2 in bios as it was designed with the 1000 series.
If you're running a 5800X on it your X370 motherboard is fully capable. It's just called PBO though. Some motherboards put it in an AMD Overclocking section behind a click-through caution screen so you may have to search for it.

You probably won't see anything on 'max voltage' because AMD's never published anything I've seen. But Robert Halleck...AMD's Technical Marketing guru who does interviews...has mentioned the 1.5V max several times. I've also seen an reddit where he's said it's not uncommon to (very briefly) hit as high as 1.55V if the processor is "very chilly".

https://ibb.co/6Pb4bjc

Keep in mind this is indeed very briefly, on the order of milliseconds in duration. To get a better idea of what voltage your processor is seeing on a sustained basis you need a monitoring utility with an averaging feature...like HWInfo64. Look at average voltage over time you'll see it's really not getting hit all that hard.

Also look for the SVI2 TFN core voltage which is the true voltage the cores are actually seeing as reported by the processor. The motherboard's VRM output voltage reading is going to be much higher if it's not measured close to the CPU socket.

And actually, when the processor is working hard and at high sustained temperature SVI2 voltage will be quite low, probably 1.25V or even less. But clocks will be lower too so it stays stable.
 
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