[SOLVED] Ryzen 5950X BIOS behaviour (high voltage and temperature)

Dec 27, 2020
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Hi everyone.

I'd like to have some information about the Ryzen 5950X behaviour in the BIOS.

I've done a new build with an ASUS Crosshair VIII Dark Hero and it shows me a voltage of approximately 1.4 and a 49 to 52°C @3.4 GHz. With stock settings.
Previously I had a Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master and I don't remember having the same temp or voltage (around 40 degrees of I remember correctly).

Is it normal? Is there a way to optimize it?

When I set the BIOS with ASUS Optimal, it sets the frequency to 4 GHz and both the temp and voltage drops down (40°C and 1.273 v).

In another thread on Reddit, where AMD_Robert talks about 3rd Gen Ryzen behaviour, it seems to be OK as there is no power management in the BIOS but a lot of the cases were within Windows.

Sorry if this has been already asked somewhere else but and didn't found it and I already had a RMA from a previous 5950X (a sudden shutdown while in Firefox, turns out both MB and CPU died...). I don't want to make mistakes and burn the CPU while installing Windows...

Thanks a lot.
 
Hi and thanks for the reply.

I'm using a NZXT Kraken X73. The pump is set downwards to avoid the RAM sticks and the radiator is at the top of the case.
Thermal paste used is the Noctua NT H2, one "big" dot of paste at the center and 4 small at the corner, as Noctua recommends.

So you think I'm good to go?

Nevertheless I still don't understand why with Gigabyte MB the voltage and temps in the BIOS were "acceptable" and the Asus goes that high.
Don't be alarmed by temps reaching close to 90c under heavy loads, as opposed to earlier Ryzen, Zen3 is allowed higher temps before dropping boost/PBO. As Ryzen doesn't report temps for each core "CPU temperature" you see is just for hottest core which is under highest load.
Asus sets higher idle voltages in the name of "Stability" as Ryzen reacts to increasing core load very fast and VRM may not adapt fast enough to supply right voltage for right load. You can adjust starting and all voltages by introducing "Negative Voltage offset" in BIOS, typically -0.05 to - 0.1v. It varies from case to case as not all CPUs are created equal.
 
Reactions: AstroFox
Hi everyone.

I'd like to have some information about the Ryzen 5950X behaviour in the BIOS.

I've done a new build with an ASUS Crosshair VIII Dark Hero and it shows me a voltage of approximately 1.4 and a 49 to 52°C @3.4 GHz. With stock settings.
Previously I had a Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master and I don't remember having the same temp or voltage (around 40 degrees of I remember correctly).

Is it normal? Is there a way to optimize it?

When I set the BIOS with ASUS Optimal, it sets the frequency to 4 GHz and both the temp and voltage drops down (40°C and 1.273 v).

In another thread on Reddit, where AMD_Robert talks about 3rd Gen Ryzen behaviour, it seems to be OK as there is no power management in the BIOS but a lot of the cases were within Windows.

Sorry if this has been already asked somewhere else but and didn't found it and I already had a RMA from a previous 5950X (a sudden shutdown while in Firefox, turns out both MB and CPU died...). I don't want to make mistakes and burn the CPU while installing Windows...

Thanks a lot.
I doubt those values killed CPU.
It's true that Zen3 CPUs are hot ones, specially 5950x (lots of cores in small space in 7nM process), what is your cooling setup?
It's also true that most BIOS versions set relatively high voltages at idle but they should drop under the load, that's not a big problem as power load is low. Ryzen in whole sets frequency and boost by leveraging power and temperatures, not necessarily voltage.
 
Reactions: AstroFox
Dec 27, 2020
13
0
10
0
I doubt those values killed CPU.
It's true that Zen3 CPUs are hot ones, specially 5950x (lots of cores in small space in 7nM process), what is your cooling setup?
It's also true that most BIOS versions set relatively high voltages at idle but they should drop under the load, that's not a big problem as power load is low. Ryzen in whole sets frequency and boost by leveraging power and temperatures, not necessarily voltage.
Hi and thanks for the reply.

I'm using a NZXT Kraken X73. The pump is set downwards to avoid the RAM sticks and the radiator is at the top of the case.
Thermal paste used is the Noctua NT H2, one "big" dot of paste at the center and 4 small at the corner, as Noctua recommends.

So you think I'm good to go?

Nevertheless I still don't understand why with Gigabyte MB the voltage and temps in the BIOS were "acceptable" and the Asus goes that high.
 
Hi and thanks for the reply.

I'm using a NZXT Kraken X73. The pump is set downwards to avoid the RAM sticks and the radiator is at the top of the case.
Thermal paste used is the Noctua NT H2, one "big" dot of paste at the center and 4 small at the corner, as Noctua recommends.

So you think I'm good to go?

Nevertheless I still don't understand why with Gigabyte MB the voltage and temps in the BIOS were "acceptable" and the Asus goes that high.
Don't be alarmed by temps reaching close to 90c under heavy loads, as opposed to earlier Ryzen, Zen3 is allowed higher temps before dropping boost/PBO. As Ryzen doesn't report temps for each core "CPU temperature" you see is just for hottest core which is under highest load.
Asus sets higher idle voltages in the name of "Stability" as Ryzen reacts to increasing core load very fast and VRM may not adapt fast enough to supply right voltage for right load. You can adjust starting and all voltages by introducing "Negative Voltage offset" in BIOS, typically -0.05 to - 0.1v. It varies from case to case as not all CPUs are created equal.
 
Reactions: AstroFox
Dec 27, 2020
13
0
10
0
Don't be alarmed by temps reaching close to 90c under heavy loads, as opposed to earlier Ryzen, Zen3 is allowed higher temps before dropping boost/PBO. As Ryzen doesn't report temps for each core "CPU temperature" you see is just for hottest core which is under highest load.
Asus sets higher idle voltages in the name of "Stability" as Ryzen reacts to increasing core load very fast and VRM may not adapt fast enough to supply right voltage for right load. You can adjust starting and all voltages by introducing "Negative Voltage offset" in BIOS, typically -0.05 to - 0.1v. It varies from case to case as not all CPUs are created equal.
Even if Asus praise stability, it remains weird for me to get 1.4v in something as basic as the BIOS. Even more when their Asus Optimal which does an automatic overclock gets better temp and voltage...



Anyway, if it's normal I'll try to install Windows with stock settings and in a second time I'll see the negative offset.



Thanks again!
 
Dec 27, 2020
13
0
10
0
In the end I installed Windows (as not only you told me it's OK, but also a Youtuber and 2 guys from Reddit) and it seems to be only in the BIOS.

I get 31 degrees in idle (when I really do nothing with HWInfo open). A quick stress test in Ryzen Master gave me 68 degrees.

So far so good. And no crash. Hope this one won't die on my watch.

See ya!
 
In the end I installed Windows (as not only you told me it's OK, but also a Youtuber and 2 guys from Reddit) and it seems to be only in the BIOS.

I get 31 degrees in idle (when I really do nothing with HWInfo open). A quick stress test in Ryzen Master gave me 68 degrees.

So far so good. And no crash. Hope this one won't die on my watch.

See ya!
Those are great results. Temperature in BIOS, although accurate at that time are not important because while in BIOS no power saving features are enabled.
 

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