Question Ryzen 7 1700

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Numbers can't tell you "if that is fine". Stability testing tells you if it is fine or not. Without doing the work, by doing the testing, anything else is just a guess or a hope.

If you have not already, download Ryzen master OR HWinfo OR Core Temp, for monitoring thermal compliance. Then do the following.

Quick and dirty overview of overclocking/stability validation procedure.

Set CPU multiplier and voltage at desired settings in BIOS. Do not use presets or automatic utilities. These will overcompensate on core and other voltages. It is much better to configure most core settings manually, and leave anything left over on auto until a later point in time if wish to come back and tweak settings such as cache (Uncore) frequency, System agent voltage, VCCIO (Internal memory controller) and memory speeds or timings (RAM) AFTER the CPU overclock is fully stable.

Save bios settings (As a new BIOS profile if your bios supports multiple profiles) and exit bios.

Boot into the Windows desktop environment. Download and install Prime95 version 26.6.

Download and install either HWinfo or CoreTemp.

Open HWinfo and run "Sensors only" or open CoreTemp.

Run Prime95 (ONLY version 26.6) and choose the "Small FFT test option". Run this for 15 minutes while monitoring your core/package temperatures to verify that you do not exceed the thermal specifications of your CPU.

(This should be considered to be 80°C for most generations of Intel processor and for current Ryzen CPUs. For older AMD FX and Phenom series, you should use a thermal monitor that has options for "Distance to TJmax" and you want to NOT see distance to TJmax drop below 10°C distance to TJmax. Anything that is MORE than 10°C distance to TJmax is within the allowed thermal envelope.)

If your CPU passes the thermal compliance test, move on to stability.

Download and install Realbench. Run Realbench and choose the Stress test option. Choose a value from the available memory (RAM) options that is equal to approximately half of your installed memory capacity. If you have 16GB, choose 8GB. If you have 8GB, choose 4GB, etc. Click start and allow the stability test to run for 8 hours. Do not plan to use the system for ANYTHING else while it is running. It will run realistic AVX and handbrake workloads and if it passes 8 hours of testing it is probably about as stable as you can reasonably expect.

If you wish to check stability further you can run 12-24 hours of Prime95 Blend mode or Small FFT.

You do not need to simultaneously run HWinfo or CoreTemp while running Realbench as you should have already performed the thermal compliance test PLUS Realbench will show current CPU temperatures while it is running.

If you run the additional stability test using Prime95 Blend/Small FFT modes for 12-24 hours, you will WANT to also run HWinfo alongside it. Monitor HWinfo periodically to verify that no cores/threads are showing less than 100% usage. If it is, then that worker has errored out and the test should be stopped.

If you find there are errors on ANY of the stability tests including Realbench or Prime95, or any other stress testing utility, you need to make a change in the bios. This could be either dropping the multiplier to a lower factor or increasing the voltage while leaving the multiplier the same. If you change voltage or multiplier at ANY time, you need to start over again at the beginning and verify thermal compliance again.

A more in depth but general guide that is still intended for beginners or those who have had a small amount of experience overclocking can be found here:


*CPU overclocking guide for beginners

*AMD Ryzen overclocking guide
 

punkncat

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Apr 3, 2018
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A couple of things I would mention.

First, be sure you have a motherboard with good VRM's. I made the mistake of buying a mid range motherboard and had loads of issues trying to overclock my R7.

You read a lot about people pulling good overclock on the stock fan. Unless you keep your house really cold consider a good tower cooler or AIO.
Have good airflow in your case as well.

All chips tend to be a bit different, motherboards too. Do a search on your specific motherboard and CPU combo and read all you can about what others did to successfully OC.

I have an R7 1700 on a X370 Taichi and a Cooler Master tower fan with 4 case fans. I finally got a stable OC @ 3.9/1.4 V . Temps stay right around the 70C mark under load on Prime 95. It took me a while and a lot of trial and error to find that spot. I actually expect I will have to turn it down a touch during the summer just due to ambient heat in the room. Time will tell.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Stock sturbo is only 3.1-3.2Ghz for all cores, despite some inaccurate early reviews online that say it has a 3.7Ghz all core turbo. Stability on one core default behavior at 3.7Ghz isn't going to require the same configuration settings as an all core 3.67Ghz, which is a weird number anyhow. Big difference in required voltage for an all core 3.1Ghz boost and a 3.67Ghz full time all core overclock.

https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/amd/ryzen_7/1700
 
Reactions: punkncat
Apr 14, 2019
19
0
10
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A couple of things I would mention.

First, be sure you have a motherboard with good VRM's. I made the mistake of buying a mid range motherboard and had loads of issues trying to overclock my R7.

You read a lot about people pulling good overclock on the stock fan. Unless you keep your house really cold consider a good tower cooler or AIO.
Have good airflow in your case as well.

All chips tend to be a bit different, motherboards too. Do a search on your specific motherboard and CPU combo and read all you can about what others did to successfully OC.

I have an R7 1700 on a X370 Taichi and a Cooler Master tower fan with 4 case fans. I finally got a stable OC @ 3.9/1.4 V . Temps stay right around the 70C mark under load on Prime 95. It took me a while and a lot of trial and error to find that spot. I actually expect I will have to turn it down a touch during the summer just due to ambient heat in the room. Time will tell.
It says my motherboard is fine for light overclocking my motherboard is a gigabyte b450 ds3h do you think that what i have is considered a light overclock? I mean i dont use prime 95 because to me that just puts to much on it when are you ever gonna stress your cpu that much in a normal situation.
 
Apr 14, 2019
19
0
10
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It says my motherboard is fine for light overclocking my motherboard is a gigabyte b450 ds3h do you think that what i have is considered a light overclock? I mean i dont use prime 95 because to me that just puts to much on it when are you ever gonna stress your cpu that much in a normal situation.
Also i forgot to say im running at 47c underload i been playing fortnite for hours to see the temp range and stuff and from what i can see to my knowledge i think its a light overclock
 

punkncat

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
1,230
55
1,540
74
Stock sturbo is only 3.1-3.2Ghz for all cores, despite some inaccurate early reviews online that say it has a 3.7Ghz all core turbo. Stability on one core default behavior at 3.7Ghz isn't going to require the same configuration settings as an all core 3.67Ghz, which is a weird number anyhow. Big difference in required voltage for an all core 3.1Ghz boost and a 3.67Ghz full time all core overclock.

https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/amd/ryzen_7/1700
Yup, the highest I have ever been able to "cause" on mine stock clock is 3.18ghz. I have never recreated a situation that made it do the 3.7 single core boost with any game or stress test, etc. I read it's fairly common thing not to be able to replicate.

With that said, my BIOS reads at ~1.18V stock and the highest I have seen even with a 1.3125 setting on manual was around 1.25V up to around 3.7ghz. within CPUz and other monitoring programs. What I have run into is unexpected crash and higher heat (funny enough) until bumping to the settings I mentioned above.
I never really had any kind of issue even at "stock" voltage up to around 3.5 ghz.
 

punkncat

Commendable
Apr 3, 2018
1,230
55
1,540
74
It says my motherboard is fine for light overclocking my motherboard is a gigabyte b450 ds3h do you think that what i have is considered a light overclock? I mean i dont use prime 95 because to me that just puts to much on it when are you ever gonna stress your cpu that much in a normal situation.

There are two games I have that cause me issue both from a CPU as well as GPU heat perspective. TC's Wildlands and Ashes of the Singularity both have shut down my PC on CPU thermal as well as video crash on a GTX1080. The only test I have found to come close is the (first checkbox) stress test within Prime 95.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
It says my motherboard is fine for light overclocking my motherboard is a gigabyte b450 ds3h do you think that what i have is considered a light overclock? I mean i dont use prime 95 because to me that just puts to much on it when are you ever gonna stress your cpu that much in a normal situation.
Prime95 should not be used as a primary stability test, which is what that comment assumes. Instead, it is BEST used for testing thermal compliance (Small FFT) or memory stability (Custom Blend mode). I assure you, there are plenty of applications and even some games out there that can push your CPU to at or near 100%, so if you are afraid to test your CPU using Prime95 or Realbench, then you might just as well return it to the stock behavior otherwise you're acting foolishly and will likely pay for it with a corrupted system sooner than you would believe.

ANY instability, causes corruption due to micro errors. It does not need to be a major instability that presents itself as blue screen, or freezing or restarts. ANY instability of the CPU or memory can result in those things too, but you can have an unstable system and NEVER know it without either testing or finding out when your system starts acting erratic for no obvious reason and you start chasing a faulty hardware problem that doesn't exist. At that point, the ONLY fix will be a complete reinstallation of everything and a total loss of any personal files that have been frequently accessed, moved or changed. It's NOT worth it. Either do the work, or don't mess with the stock default behavior at all.

If we were talking about using AVX versions of Prime95, that would be a different story, because then, yes, you would be creating unrealistic thermal conditions, but we're not. You should be using Prime95 version 26.6 which does not use AVX instructions, for testing thermal compliance and then my recommendation is an 8 hour run of Realbench to test stability. If you wish to further ensure stability you can also run Prime95 on Small FFT for 15-24 hours or a custom 8 hour test which can be found in my memory and XMP guide.

Regardless of architecture, Prime95 v26.6 works equally well across all platforms. Steady-state is the key. How can anyone extrapolate accurate Core temperatures from workloads that fluctuate like a bad day on the Stock Market?

I'm aware of 5 utilities with steady-state workloads. In order of load level they are:

(1) P95 v26.6 - Small FFT's
(2) HeavyLoad - Stress CPU
(3) FurMark - CPU Burner
(4) Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool - CPU Load
(5) AIDA64 - Tools - System Stability Test - Stress CPU

AIDA64's Stress CPU fails to load any overcloked / ovevolted CPU to get anywhere TDP, and is therefore useless, except for giving naive users a sense of false security because their temps are so low.

HeavyLoad is the closest alternative. Temps and watts are within 3% of Small FFT's.

Computronix
Respected veteran member and moderator and author of the Intel temperature guide
 

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