[SOLVED] RYZEN 7 2700X Vcore voltage is 1.39

Dec 13, 2018
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Here is the pic
My RYZEN 7 2700X is using 1.39 Vcore voltage showed in the bios. Using stock cooler and mobo is b450 tomahawk max. I NEVER overclocked my cpu, but i did set my memory to 3200mhz once (but not when i clicked the image).
So is it completely normal? Because i surfed the internet and got to know amd would never recommend users to run the cpu beyond 1.4v right?
 

DimkaTsv

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Nov 7, 2021
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My RYZEN 7 2700X is using 1.39 Vcore voltage showed in the bios.
Hmm, i am not sure if Zen+ have same controller as Zen3 CPU, but you can try to check per core and vcore through HWInfo.
Peak voltages on Ryzen can go even up to 1.5 for short amount of times (like fractions of seconds), but without load they aren't very threatening.
But constant 1.39 can be a bit of concern, even though AMD is fine with up to 1.35-1.4V constant voltage iirc.
Are your 1.39V permament or it is peak value?
Another concern that can be noted is bios doesn't have a load and CPU runs minimum core clock multiplier. . .
So with Zen 3 voltages will not be high without load, but idk about Zen+
Try to check HWInfo under idle, full core (max thread), 2/3 cores (1/3 threads) load, and single thread load and check voltages under these
Highest voltage that can be easliy triggered can be achieved by CPU-Z benchmark when it tests single core performance.


Soo... try to check these.
Look at Core VID and CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN) in CPU graphs
 
Don't worry about the voltage reports while in the BIOS. First, that's not accurate operating voltage since the CPU isn't in a fully operating mode yet. That won't come until an OS loads and activates all parts of the CPU including all the cores. Second, it's likely a bit high while in BIOS to assure stability for making settings.

Check voltage while in the OS with a monitoring program that correctly displays Ryzen's reported voltage, like HWInfo64. Look for a CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN) reading in the Sensors screen. That's the voltage the CPU cores are actually receiving

You will see it fluctuating quite a bit since a safe voltage depends on the core temperature. It can be higher when load is light and core temperature is low, and goes lower when load is heavy and core temperature is high. So just keep the CPU Vcore settings on AUTO in BIOS and it will be safe as it manages itself.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: tridibeshdashingggg
Dec 13, 2018
20
1
4,515
0
Don't worry about the voltage reports while in the BIOS. First, that's not accurate operating voltage since the CPU isn't in a fully operating mode yet. That won't come until an OS loads and activates all parts of the CPU including all the cores. Second, it's likely a bit high while in BIOS to assure stability for making settings.

Check voltage while in the OS with a monitoring program that correctly displays Ryzen's reported voltage, like HWInfo64. Look for a CPU Core Voltage (SVI2 TFN) reading in the Sensors screen. That's the voltage the CPU cores are actually receiving

You will see it fluctuating quite a bit since a safe voltage depends on the core temperature. It can be higher when load is light and core temperature is low, and goes lower when load is heavy and core temperature is high. So just keep the CPU Vcore settings on AUTO in BIOS and it will be safe as it manages itself.
You mean this?
 
Reactions: drea.drechsler
So is it completely normal? Because i surfed the internet and got to know amd would never recommend users to run the cpu beyond 1.4v right?
https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/cbls9g View: https://www.reddit.com/r/Amd/comments/cbls9g/the_final_word_on_idle_voltages_for_3rd_gen_ryzen/


Ryzen processors can go up to 1.5V. That's AMD's official word on it (the OP of that post is an AMD rep)

Please note that it is totally normal for your Ryzen to use voltages in a range of 0.200V - 1.500V -- this is the factory operating range of the CPU. It is also totally normal for the temperature to cycle through 10°C swings as boost comes on and off. You will always see these characteristics, as they're intended, so do not be surprised to see such values. :)
 
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DimkaTsv

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Nov 7, 2021
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Seems fine, you can leave it for night for example, and look onto average. that way you will notice, that 1.35+V takes only small part of time, and average will be probably around 1.22-1.25 for you. Full idle is 0.8V (you can find these values in minimum), which is comletely fine.
Ofc if it still bother you, you can try to undervolt CPU, but doesn't seem you will want to invest some time into that.
 
Reactions: tridibeshdashingggg
Looks about right if it's only the software that's capturing your screen running.

See what it does when you start running a really heavy load, something like Cinebench 20. I'm not that familiar with Zen+ CPU's, but I could imagine it going below 1.3V in the middle of the render if your system is set up full stock with both clocks and voltage on auto.
 
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DimkaTsv

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Nov 7, 2021
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I'm not that familiar with Zen+ CPU's, but I could imagine it going below 1.3V in the middle of the render if your system is set up full stock with both clocks and voltage on auto.
It will drop to around 1,25-1.27 for this idle voltage, i suppose, lemme place my guess there before mystery will be revealed)
Also... i am bit more interested in this



Aren't they supposed to be equal?
 
Reactions: tridibeshdashingggg
It will drop to around 1,25-1.27 for this idle voltage, i suppose, lemme place my guess there before mystery will be revealed)
Also... i am bit more interested in this



Aren't they supposed to be equal?
I understand the inaccuracies...or at least that they exist even if not exactly why they exist. But why the IF clock and memory clock should be .5Ghz different is something I just don't get. It seems to me they should both be subject to the same inaccuracies and therefore identically inaccurate.

I wonder if you should de-sync the IF they would have the same .5Ghz delta?
 
Reactions: tridibeshdashingggg
I understand the inaccuracies...or at least that they exist even if not exactly why they exist. But why the IF clock and memory clock should be .5Ghz different is something I just don't get. It seems to me they should both be subject to the same inaccuracies and therefore identically inaccurate.

I wonder if you should de-sync the IF they would have the same .5Ghz delta?
It's 0.5 MHz off. Which is well within the realm of noise.
 

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