Question Ryzen 7 5800x driving me crazy

Sep 3, 2021
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Hi,

I know there is a lot about Ryzen 7 5800x and temperatures, I’ve read so much on this but still don’t know what to do.

The thing is: I just got a Prebuilt Asus ROG desktop which I am loving so far, it comes with a 3070 (that performs great and have good temperatures) and a Ryzen 7 5800x, which I was really excited about because I had read great things about it.

The problem is I am getting so many temperature spikes! It idles at 40-50c, and stays at 74-78 when gaming most of the time, but suddenly I get temperature spikes up to 84-87C, out of nowhere. This happens specially in game menus or when entering/ leaving a game.

I tried Cinebench R23 and got 14550 points multicore (temps at 90C the whole time) and 1570 in single core (with lower temps).

I know the 5800x is one of the hottest CPUs out there and have read that it can take these high temperatures, it’s not the 90C in Cinebench that stresses me, it’s those constant temp spikes.

Although this can be considered as normal by many, I would like to lower the temperatures, it doesn’t make sense to me that it gets to 87C just by returning to the game menu after a match. I know that many of you have gotten better temps with some CPU tweaks, can you guys help me out with this?

edit: here is a picture of Gears of war 5, where it reached 90C! just after returning to the game menu from an online match.

 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Are you working with the stock cooler or an AIO. Since you've mentioned this being a prebuilt, can you provide an SKU to the build or perhaps a link to the build you purchase? If you're referring to the system being build by a builder, then it's best you list the specs to your build like so:
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
Chassis:
OS:

You should also be able to use CPU-Z to see what your current BIOS version for your motherboard is, found under the mainboard tab.
 
Reactions: Makaveli
If you replaced the CPU yourself, there's also the issue that Ryzen CPUs based on Zen 2 or after have a comparatively unusual die layout. That is, the dies are offset from the center. Doing the traditional "rice grain blob in the middle" may not provide complete coverage of the dies.
 
Sep 3, 2021
3
0
10
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Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Are you working with the stock cooler or an AIO. Since you've mentioned this being a prebuilt, can you provide an SKU to the build or perhaps a link to the build you purchase? If you're referring to the system being build by a builder, then it's best you list the specs to your build like so:
CPU:
Motherboard:
Ram:
SSD/HDD:
GPU:
PSU:
Chassis:
OS:

You should also be able to use CPU-Z to see what your current BIOS version for your motherboard is, found under the mainboard tab.
Hi, yeah. This is it:

ASUS ROG Strix GA15
CPU: Ryzen 7 5800x
Motherboard: Asus tek
Ram: 16GB 2x8gb 3200
SSD/HDD:1tb SSD + 2tb HDD
GPU: RTX 3070
PSU: 750w Asus
Chassis: -
OS: Windows 11
BIOS version: I don’t remember what it was, but I updated it yesterday.
 

Bassman999

Upstanding
Feb 27, 2021
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I would take the cooler off clean and re-paste with a good paste. I personally use the Noctua one, but there are many quality ones that are better than OEMs use. Use a decent amount but dont go crazy.
If that doesnt work ( if you havent already) go into bios and set a more aggressive fan speed.
Dp you have any other fans for intake and exhaust?
 
I would take the cooler off clean and re-paste with a good paste. I personally use the Noctua one, but there are many quality ones that are better than OEMs use. Use a decent amount but dont go crazy.
If that doesnt work ( if you havent already) go into bios and set a more aggressive fan speed.
Dp you have any other fans for intake and exhaust?
I agree with this. Repasting is certainly worth doing.

But if you're wanting to do some CPU tweaks first, read up on voltage offsets and try that. The Asus BIOS should allow that, I'd be surprised if it didn't. I use one with this system, can't remember the value I have it set at though.
 
Reactions: Bassman999
...

The problem is I am getting so many temperature spikes! It idles at 40-50c, and stays at 74-78 when gaming most of the time, but suddenly I get temperature spikes up to 84-87C,
...
I don't know what you've been reading, but what you're describing is perfectly normal and expected for Ryzen. The processor uses hot-spot temperature sensors and the temp spikes occur whenever a core boosts clock. It's perfectly normal for the way Ryzen's boost algorithm works.

Your temps are expected and normal too. AMD's said 5800X's are designed to see temps up to 90C before the boost algorithm starts pulling clocks. It's part of the way it works and doesn't affect CPU life span.

BTW: Hallock is AMD technical marketing guru. It's been his job, pretty much throughout Ryzen era, to hang out in online forums at launch and clarify technical issues with the CPU for enthusiasts. He is very much the "voice of AMD" so what he says has the weight of both AMD's and TSMC's engineers and scientists who designed the process, production node and product.

 
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Reactions: RodroX
Is that a long, thin plate dividing the cpu cooler and the gpu???
That seems counter-productive, considering the nature of the gpu below it, but it probably shields that barely adequate cpu cooler from the gpu's exhaust.
Asus, what are you doing...
I actually think the concept is sort of clever as it appears to direct the GPU's hot exhaust up, over and away from the CPU cooler's intake.

But...for it to be completely effective the case has to provide a steady source of cool outside air to the input of the GPU. I'd be more interested in how OP's GPU temps are behaving in gaming action.

How do I get me one? oh. too late. I'm using front mounted liquid cooling now...that sidesteps GPU exhaust heating entirely.
 
Reactions: RodroX

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
I actually think the concept is sort of clever as it appears to direct the GPU's hot exhaust up, over and away from the CPU cooler's intake.

But...for it to be completely effective the case has to provide a steady source of cool outside air to the input of the GPU. I'd be more interested in how OP's GPU temps are behaving in gaming action.

How do I get me one? oh. too late. I'm using front mounted liquid cooling now...that sidesteps GPU exhaust heating entirely.
You have a point, but the top and side panels seem to work against it...
 
Reactions: Bassman999

Bassman999

Upstanding
Feb 27, 2021
474
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290
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Is that a long, thin plate dividing the cpu cooler and the gpu???
That seems counter-productive, considering the nature of the gpu below it, but it probably shields that barely adequate cpu cooler from the gpu's exhaust.
Asus, what are you doing...
I didnt notice that originally, and agree that its strange.
 
Is that a 80mm tower cooler on top of the R7 5800X?.

Altough 90°C would not hurt the CPU, I think even a 120mm budget one, would probably be a way better choice for an 8c/16 threads. Then again probaly wont fit in because of that long plate diving the case.

Also, if the front fan is not working as intake, that will really hurt the 80mm cpu cooler performance.

OP should really check all case fans are working as best as they can and positioned in the right direction. The rear one seems to be ok, but sadly that seems to be another 80mm fan.

Well perhaps are 92mm ones, not really sure. Still they have to work faster to move decent air.
 
The Ryzen 7 5800X really needs an All In One (AIO) water cooler with a radiator of 240mm minimum, 280mm or bigger is best, to keep the temps down but it will still reach the 90°c mark in heavy loads.

The reason you are seeing the temps you are is your cooler really isn't sufficient enough so you are hitting the 90°c mark quicker than it would with a better cooler.

As mentioned before crank up the speed on the fan on your existing cooler and case fans to try to mitigate the high temps till you can replace the cooler with a better one.

As a side note to those that think differently, that cooler is a 120mm tower cooler.
 

Phaaze88

Titan
Ambassador
The Ryzen 7 5800X really needs an All In One (AIO) water cooler with a radiator of 240mm minimum, 280mm or bigger is best, to keep the temps down but it will still reach the 90°c mark in heavy loads.
The problem with the 5800X lies under the hood - something most users can't do a thing about.
"It's well known that the 5800x has heat issues, because its got the same TDP as the 12 core 5900x, but half the actual die space to dissipate that heat.
This means no matter how big a cooler you slap onto these chips, they just overheat and run close to 80C as the solder AMD used just cant get the heat out fast enough."

Since the thermal transfer solution underneath the IHS is inefficent, that means a fair bit of the heat produced is instead 'lost' in the socket, instead of going up through the IHS > TIM > cpu cooler cold plate, etc. to be properly dissipated.
The 5800X uses less power(maximum) than a 10700K/11700K: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-core-i7-11700k-cpu-review/3
... and somehow 'needs' just as big a cooler as those 2 cpus do? Something is not right there.
 

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