[SOLVED] Ryzen 7 5800x high utilisation and temperature ?

Feb 1, 2022
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My new ryzen 7 5800x has high utilization (and temp) in “idle”. For example, during a maven build my cpy utilization goes up to 90% sometimes with a temp of 65/70C (or even more). I know that 5800x is a very hot cpu (and i don’t have a good cooler - see spec below), so my concern is about utilization in normal task.
Is that normal? Can a new cooler help with that?

Full specs:
-asus Rog strix b550-i gaming
-ryzen 7 5800x
-cooler master hyper 412r
-corsair vengeance LPX DDR4-RAM 3600 MHz 2x 16GB
-Cooler Master nr200 case
-wd black sn850
- gtx1660 msi ventus oc
 
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Karadjgne

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Ryzens are efficiency engines. The more efficient you can get them, the better they perform. Their performance is based on 3 things basically and that's loads, temps and voltages.

Unlike Intels, Ryzens are a dynamic cpu, and do respond to changes. A Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 60°C will actually 'think' faster than the same Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 80°C. So while boosts speeds are important, they get balanced by voltages and temps. If you get a really good cooler, and do nothing with the voltages, you'll gain next to nothing.

My 3700x gets better cinebench scores, higher fps in games with a 1.325v VID at 4.28GHz and 62°C than it does using Auto voltages at 4.4GHz and 84°C. And that's a common occurance.

Ignore temps for a minute, see what you can do to bring your voltages down, in HWInfo there's 3 to watch, VID - CPU - and SVI2. VID is supplied, CPU is demanded, SVI2 is used. If you drop VID in small stages, it'll limit what the cpu can demand, and use. The byproduct of lowering voltages is lowered temps.

Use cinebench to test, not only for stability, but the scores. You want to get the best score, if it starts dropping with repeated tests, that's about where your voltages need to be, then worry about trying to get temps down to roughly 60°C under decent loads.

And yes, the Scythe Fuma2 is a great little 200w cooler, and the Arctic LF II 240mm is about the best 240mm AIO on the market.
 
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Lutfij

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Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Might want to see what Task Manager's resource monitor shows you when the system is idle just after you boot into OS GUI. Speaking of OS, what OS are you working with? If you're on Windows 10, include the OS version(not edition).
 
Feb 1, 2022
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Welcome to the forums, newcomer!

Might want to see what Task Manager's resource monitor shows you when the system is idle just after you boot into OS GUI. Speaking of OS, what OS are you working with? If you're on Windows 10, include the OS version(not edition).
Thank you! It's Windows 11 21H2 22000.434 (but it happens on Linux as well).
Below screens of Task Manager (there was initially a peak of 22% utilization that i wasn't able to capture)


 

Karadjgne

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How mature is the OS? Microsoft has a nasty habit of sneaking in stuff like security updates, or extending the update procedure over idle periods. If you have a recent OS, it can take several days, even a week, to fully update if you don't give it enough idle time to complete the task. I usually suggest for new OS to leave the pc on at least overnight-all day with no usage, just for that reason.

If it's an update OS, ported from Win10, Microsoft now has your key and build, but your pc will have junk files no longer used as such, but leftover and still accessed by the new OS. I usually suggest a clean install of the new OS to get rid of that junk.
 
Feb 1, 2022
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It's a clean install. I built this pc on 28/01. Do you think it is not a problem with cpu/cooler? it happens on linux as well.

P.S: i forgot to mention my gpu (gtx 1660)

Edit:
56% utilization, 71C temp (as soon as I started the maven build)
 
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Karadjgne

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56% is a decent load amount possibly, so 70°C if you have higher or stock voltages, isn't out of the realm of possibility.

And yes, the 412 is a little small, basically not much different to the Ryzen stock coolers.
 
Feb 1, 2022
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I thought cpu usage was too high. Maybe I've never noticed on my old pc (intel i5 6500). I just tested it with csgo: cpu usage around 20% with temp 60/70C.
However, would a scythe fuma 2 be much better and solve the problem? or an artic liquid freezer II 240 (even if I have no experience with aio cooler and i'm a bit scared of damages).
Is it worth changing the cooler?
 

Karadjgne

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Ryzens are efficiency engines. The more efficient you can get them, the better they perform. Their performance is based on 3 things basically and that's loads, temps and voltages.

Unlike Intels, Ryzens are a dynamic cpu, and do respond to changes. A Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 60°C will actually 'think' faster than the same Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 80°C. So while boosts speeds are important, they get balanced by voltages and temps. If you get a really good cooler, and do nothing with the voltages, you'll gain next to nothing.

My 3700x gets better cinebench scores, higher fps in games with a 1.325v VID at 4.28GHz and 62°C than it does using Auto voltages at 4.4GHz and 84°C. And that's a common occurance.

Ignore temps for a minute, see what you can do to bring your voltages down, in HWInfo there's 3 to watch, VID - CPU - and SVI2. VID is supplied, CPU is demanded, SVI2 is used. If you drop VID in small stages, it'll limit what the cpu can demand, and use. The byproduct of lowering voltages is lowered temps.

Use cinebench to test, not only for stability, but the scores. You want to get the best score, if it starts dropping with repeated tests, that's about where your voltages need to be, then worry about trying to get temps down to roughly 60°C under decent loads.

And yes, the Scythe Fuma2 is a great little 200w cooler, and the Arctic LF II 240mm is about the best 240mm AIO on the market.
 
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Feb 1, 2022
6
0
10
0
Ryzens are efficiency engines. The more efficient you can get them, the better they perform. Their performance is based on 3 things basically and that's loads, temps and voltages.

Unlike Intels, Ryzens are a dynamic cpu, and do respond to changes. A Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 60°C will actually 'think' faster than the same Ryzen at 4.0GHz and 80°C. So while boosts speeds are important, they get balanced by voltages and temps. If you get a really good cooler, and do nothing with the voltages, you'll gain next to nothing.

My 3700x gets better cinebench scores, higher fps in games with a 1.325v VID at 4.28GHz and 62°C than it does using Auto voltages at 4.4GHz and 84°C. And that's a common occurance.

Ignore temps for a minute, see what you can do to bring your voltages down, in HWInfo there's 3 to watch, VID - CPU - and SVI2. VID is supplied, CPU is demanded, SVI2 is used. If you drop VID in small stages, it'll limit what the cpu can demand, and use. The byproduct of lowering voltages is lowered temps.

Use cinebench to test, not only for stability, but the scores. You want to get the best score, if it starts dropping with repeated tests, that's about where your voltages need to be, then worry about trying to get temps down to roughly 60°C under decent loads.

And yes, the Scythe Fuma2 is a great little 200w cooler, and the Arctic LF II 240mm is about the best 240mm AIO on the market.
Thank you, made it clear!
In HWInfo i can find only VID. Is there a guide on how i can change VID?
 

Karadjgne

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That's not HWInfo64, you can get that at guru3d.com. When you run it, it'll have a pop-up box, make sure to check the 'sensors only' box. It has multiple sections, breaking down cpu voltages, speeds, effective speeds, voltages etc on each core. To change VID, that's done in bios.

What you want to look for is a baseline VID, so you'd run cinebench and see where the VID and svi2 voltages sit at. Then set that voltage in bios, retest and see if there's a difference. Thats your starting point. From there start dropping the VID by 0.05-0.08v or so, retest and watch the cinebench scores. You'll get to a point where the scores level off, then start dropping, at that point go back up in voltage a tick, and you are done.

You can also retest if you do decide to get a better cooler, starting from the current vid see how dropping voltages more affects the scores. You'll get a balance where dropping voltages does nothing for the scores, lowers boosts etc. It's somewhat time consuming, amd has already tuned a cpu/bios to fit everyone, what you are doing is fine tuning your particular cpu/vrms/mobo for best all around performance for you.
 

Karadjgne

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Top 2 lines. The SoC voltage is cpu memory controller. Top line is VID. Line underneath is cpu svi2.

In your bios, it'll list a setting for vid, it's most likely currently set on Auto. You'll see maximum value at idle state. It's showing 1.494v max. So that'll be single core idle max.

If you set manual vid at 1.494v, you should get roughly the same results on a retest. You can most likely make a sizable jump down to 1.400v to start with for VID, then dip to 1.392v etc in successive drops if the scores say you are getting better. My VID is currently 1.325v for instance.

It's not On the motherboard, those settings are in bios, accessible when you first boot up, hit F2 or Delete Before windows starts loading. You can Google more explicit directions, directions are also in your motherboard manual.

Think of it like you going to a grocery store and buying a pack of gum. The cashier on Auto puts the gum in a giant brown paper bag, because anything will fit in that huge bag. That's wasteful, cumbersome, kinda dumb. What you are doing by lowering the VID is stopping the cashier, and making her use a smaller bag, more appropriate to the size of the pack of gum. Less waste, less heat, less cumbersome, more streamlined.

Every cpu is unique, requires whatever it requires. AMD doesn't test every single cpu for its individual requirements, so they use a giant brown bag that fits every cpu. Manual adjustment finds the right size bag for your particular cpu, so you only use what you realistically need, not a one-size-fits all approach.
 
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