[SOLVED] Ryzen 7 5800X overheating

Jan 14, 2022
6
3
15
0
Hi,
I have a new build computer, but my CPU is heating up very fast. In idle, it has approximately 33 °C, but already when browsing through the web, it heats up to 70 °C. Starting WoW, the CPU shuts down due to overheating after a few seconds, reaching temperatures above 90 °C. Also running Cinebench , the CPU overheats and shuts down. I used the Jonsbo CR-701 fan cooling system for CPU cooling, which should offer sufficient cooling power with a TDP of 135 W. I put off the sticker before attaching it to the CPU and checked, the heat paste is distributed evenly. The temperature of the GPU and inside the housing stay low, so it seems to be a local problem on the CPU. Any ideas on how to increase the cooling efficiency or what could cause the CPU to heat up that fast?

Many thanks!

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800x
CPU Cooler: Jonsbo CR-701
MoBo: ROG Strix B550-E
PSU: Corsair RM750x 80 Plus Gold
RAM: G.Skill Aegis DIMM Kit 32 GB, DDR4-3200
GPU (VBIOS): RTX 3070 Dual
OS (Version): Windows 11 x64
 
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CPU Cooler: Jonsbo CR-701
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That's not really going to be enough cooler for that CPU, so you need to let the fan take off when it gets warm. Also need to make sure your case has a lot of airflow at the same time or it will end up using hot exhaust air from the GPU, making it even worse when gaming.

But understanding Ryzen 5000 temperature is also useful: it's typical and by design that the CPU will raise temps as high as 90C in use. Even so, it's not desireable for performance reasons as above 80 or so it starts really pulling back on boost clocks. But the algorithm tends to try and reach those temps before actually throttling.
 
...
CPU Cooler: Jonsbo CR-701
...
That's not really going to be enough cooler for that CPU, so you need to let the fan take off when it gets warm. Also need to make sure your case has a lot of airflow at the same time or it will end up using hot exhaust air from the GPU, making it even worse when gaming.

But understanding Ryzen 5000 temperature is also useful: it's typical and by design that the CPU will raise temps as high as 90C in use. Even so, it's not desireable for performance reasons as above 80 or so it starts really pulling back on boost clocks. But the algorithm tends to try and reach those temps before actually throttling.
 

pietrofonti

Commendable
Dec 4, 2019
7
2
1,515
0
Hi,
I have a new build computer, but my CPU is heating up very fast. In idle, it has approximately 33 °C, but already when browsing through the web, it heats up to 70 °C. Starting WoW, the CPU shuts down due to overheating after a few seconds, reaching temperatures above 90 °C. Also running Cinebench , the CPU overheats and shuts down. I used the Jonsbo CR-701 fan cooling system for CPU cooling, which should offer sufficient cooling power with a TDP of 135 W. I put off the sticker before attaching it to the CPU and checked, the heat paste is distributed evenly. The temperature of the GPU and inside the housing stay low, so it seems to be a local problem on the CPU. Any ideas on how to increase the cooling efficiency or what could cause the CPU to heat up that fast?

Many thanks!

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800x
CPU Cooler: Jonsbo CR-701
MoBo: ROG Strix B550-E
PSU: Corsair RM750x 80 Plus Gold
RAM: G.Skill Aegis DIMM Kit 32 GB, DDR4-3200
GPU (VBIOS): RTX 3070 Dual
OS (Version): Windows 11 x64
As drea.drechler said, that's a "low profile Cooler" for a higher TDP CPU. It couldn't be a problem if u have a good case, with good airflow, but it seems something not right about that.
What's the Case u're using, and how's the fans setup?
Was thermal paste ok?
 
Jan 14, 2022
6
3
15
0
As drea.drechler said, that's a "low profile Cooler" for a higher TDP CPU. It couldn't be a problem if u have a good case, with good airflow, but it seems something not right about that.
What's the Case u're using, and how's the fans setup?
Was thermal paste ok?

But what do you have to look for in a cooler? I thought comparing the TDP values of the CPU and the cooler is enough. The cooler says it's for TDPs lower than 135 W, with a power consumption of 105 W of the CPU, I thought there cannot be more power loss due to heat than 105 W.

I'm using the ROG Strix Helios case, I've got 3 fans sucking air in in the front and one in the back for sucking the air out. Since a friend of mine had more fans lying around, I also tried including 2 fans on top, one sucking in at the front end and one sucking out at the back end of the case, which didn't change anything.

Thermal paste looked ok, I built it together with that friend who already built a few PCs and he said nothing seemed off with the thermal paste.
 
But what do you have to look for in a cooler? I thought comparing the TDP values of the CPU and the cooler is enough. The cooler says it's for TDPs lower than 135 W, with a power consumption of 105 W of the CPU, I thought there cannot be more power loss due to heat than 105 W.

I'm using the ROG Strix Helios case, I've got 3 fans sucking air in in the front and one in the back for sucking the air out. Since a friend of mine had more fans lying around, I also tried including 2 fans on top, one sucking in at the front end and one sucking out at the back end of the case, which didn't change anything.

Thermal paste looked ok, I built it together with that friend who already built a few PCs and he said nothing seemed off with the thermal paste.
The thing about Ryzen CPU's is they overclock themselves if cooled really well. That makes it VERY desireable to throw the rules out and just go for the best cooler you can fit. Big dual fan towers like BeQuiet Dark Rock 4, Scythe Mugen whatever kind of BIG mean you can keep fan speeds fairly low and stay in the 70C range while gaming. When you do that you might find your CPU hitting boost clocks well over 4700Mhz with no other changes. My 5800X hits 4800-4850Mhz while gaming on a 240mm AIO, with curve optimizer it's hitting 5000-5025Mhz.

BUT you can also get along with lesser coolers. Just make sure there's plenty of cool air flow to the CPU fan and are willing to put up with really high fan speeds. And understand that 90C is normal and expected by design...AMD's even said so.
 
Last edited:

pietrofonti

Commendable
Dec 4, 2019
7
2
1,515
0
But what do you have to look for in a cooler? I thought comparing the TDP values of the CPU and the cooler is enough. The cooler says it's for TDPs lower than 135 W, with a power consumption of 105 W of the CPU, I thought there cannot be more power loss due to heat than 105 W.

I'm using the ROG Strix Helios case, I've got 3 fans sucking air in in the front and one in the back for sucking the air out. Since a friend of mine had more fans lying around, I also tried including 2 fans on top, one sucking in at the front end and one sucking out at the back end of the case, which didn't change anything.

Thermal paste looked ok, I built it together with that friend who already built a few PCs and he said nothing seemed off with the thermal paste.
Tbh I don't know really, I'm far from being an expert in coolers. What I know is that all low profile coolers have specs with TDP enough for any CPU out there, but when performing is a completely diferent scenario. If change a low profile on higher demanding CPU for a bigger profile cooler I end up to have a huge drop on temperature, some times with 20º less, without changing any other setup. I had a PC with ryzen 2600, with the stock cooler (low profile) and temps were always great even running cinebench, but when I had a higher TDP demanding CPU like 2700X, the stock cooler would give me temps almost above 80º while with a noctua NH-D15S I don't have more than 68º, when doing the same arnold cpu rendering or cinebench.

Regarding ur setup, I would use a equal input/out ratio. Like 2Fans In / 2 Fans out. In ur case, since u added 2 more fans, u should actually put both Top fans to exaust.
So it wil be: 3 Front fans - INTAKE | 1 Back and 2 Top - EXAUST
 
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Jan 14, 2022
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Thanks everyone.

So, I figured out that the shutdowns are not due to the heat, but more due to overshooting of the CPU voltage. When regulating it manually, I can play on a stable system. Does anyone know, why the CPU is supplied with higher voltages than it can handle?

I checked, the BIOS is up to date, the motherboard is compatible with the CPU and the CPU model is recognized by the system.
 
Thanks everyone.

So, I figured out that the shutdowns are not due to the heat, but more due to overshooting of the CPU voltage. When regulating it manually, I can play on a stable system. Does anyone know, why the CPU is supplied with higher voltages than it can handle?

I checked, the BIOS is up to date, the motherboard is compatible with the CPU and the CPU model is recognized by the system.
What voltage is it hitting? by design it will hit up to 1.5V when boosting and you should expect that. When extra cool it may even hit a little over that.

That doesn't mean you can set a fixed voltage that high. It's only safe when the algorithm is controlling voltage and boost clocks as it regulates both while watching core temperature.
 
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Jan 14, 2022
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So Armoury Crate showed me spikes up to 1.7 V, after which it immediatly shuts down. In the system log, windows then also shows me "WHEA uncorrectable error", indicating the hardware problem
 
So Armoury Crate showed me spikes up to 1.7 V, after which it immediatly shuts down. In the system log, windows then also shows me "WHEA uncorrectable error", indicating the hardware problem
Yeah...well first things first TRY to uninstall Armoury Crate. It's pure garbage IMO but it may be hard to uninstall without a complete fresh install of Windows (I wound up doing that for my TUF B550m). For a monitoring utility get HWInfo64, easily the best for AM4 systems.

FWIW: it's impossible for Ryzen to hit greater than 1.55V since that's the maximum VID. Armoury Crate is completely untrustable.

Just to touch all bases:
Did you install Windows from a clean install?
Did you update BIOS to the latest?
Did you reset CMOS? even if the board came with the latest BIOS out of the box?
Have you run a memory test? do it especially if you've set XMP.
 
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Reactions: drivinfast247
Jan 14, 2022
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Ok, then I will uninstall Armoury Crate and replace it with HWInfo64.


I was running Windows 11 first, but hoped that (even if I could not really believe it) this was the problem, then cleared all partitions and then installed windows 10.
BIOS is, according to the ASUS website, up to date.
I did reset CMOS and used Memtest 86, which showed no problem with the RAM in 4 runs, 13 tests each

I also checked the compatibility of the used RAM, the motherboard and the CPU, which should all be given
 
Ok, then I will uninstall Armoury Crate and replace it with HWInfo64.


I was running Windows 11 first, but hoped that (even if I could not really believe it) this was the problem, then cleared all partitions and then installed windows 10.
BIOS is, according to the ASUS website, up to date.
I did reset CMOS and used Memtest 86, which showed no problem with the RAM in 4 runs, 13 tests each

I also checked the compatibility of the used RAM, the motherboard and the CPU, which should all be given
If EVERYTHING is in full stock settings-- that means with a CMOS reset--the WHEA errors are the most troubling.

In all honesty, you probably won't be able to fully uninstall Armoury Crate. It's like virus as it plants services that won't uninstall. You can get a special utility (google for it) but that still doesn't get all the monitoring and update services that are left behind. I tried to hack it out...wound up realizing it's better to just re-install Windows since it was a fresh install anyway. BTW, to complete the Virus like behaviour of it: it tried to install itself at every bootup even with a fresh Windows install. I had to disable a setting in BIOS to make it NOT do that. IMO, it's a very dangerous thing because of all the back-doors it sets up on your system...everyone hates on Microsoft for this sort of thing but nobody on Asus. (rant off)
 
Last edited:

Nighthawk117

Notable
Sep 27, 2021
880
237
890
43
Hi,
I have a new build computer, but my CPU is heating up very fast. In idle, it has approximately 33 °C, but already when browsing through the web, it heats up to 70 °C. Starting WoW, the CPU shuts down due to overheating after a few seconds, reaching temperatures above 90 °C. Also running Cinebench , the CPU overheats and shuts down. I used the Jonsbo CR-701 fan cooling system for CPU cooling, which should offer sufficient cooling power with a TDP of 135 W. I put off the sticker before attaching it to the CPU and checked, the heat paste is distributed evenly. The temperature of the GPU and inside the housing stay low, so it seems to be a local problem on the CPU. Any ideas on how to increase the cooling efficiency or what could cause the CPU to heat up that fast?

Many thanks!

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 5800x
CPU Cooler: Jonsbo CR-701
MoBo: ROG Strix B550-E
PSU: Corsair RM750x 80 Plus Gold
RAM: G.Skill Aegis DIMM Kit 32 GB, DDR4-3200
GPU (VBIOS): RTX 3070 Dual
OS (Version): Windows 11 x64
It's known to be a very hot chip:
It's never going to be super cool but I would have gone with a more powerful cooler. Personally, I would manually configure an aggressive fan curve in the bios and enable eco-mode and see what impact that has.
 

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