Question Ryzen Master shows Ryzen 3 3300x as non-overclockable

Dec 10, 2020
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Right now it isnt really a problem for me since i am still waiting for my new motherboard to arrive. But I want to make sure my 3300x is not defective or anything.

What happened is that when i installed ryzen master, it displayed a notice that the processor doesnt support overclocking and that profiles are disabled. Correct me If I am wrong but i think 3300x is overclockable? and while at it, may i ask also if upgrading to a b450m board will reduce my thermal problems with the said cpu? read some reviews that a320m board vrms are bad that it makes cpu thermals higher than it should be, i wanna know if thats true.

Specs:
ryzen 3 3300x
asus prime a320m-k
stock amd cooler
case(not know but i pretty much removed the front panel. for aiflow)

idle temps: 53-70C
room temp: 33-35C
 
Right now it isnt really a problem for me since i am still waiting for my new motherboard to arrive. But I want to make sure my 3300x is not defective or anything.

What happened is that when i installed ryzen master, it displayed a notice that the processor doesnt support overclocking and that profiles are disabled. Correct me If I am wrong but i think 3300x is overclockable? and while at it, may i ask also if upgrading to a b450m board will reduce my thermal problems with the said cpu? read some reviews that a320m board vrms are bad that it makes cpu thermals higher than it should be, i wanna know if thats true.

Specs:
ryzen 3 3300x
asus prime a320m-k
stock amd cooler
case(not know but i pretty much removed the front panel. for aiflow)

idle temps: 53-70C
room temp: 33-35C
Bad VRM's can cause the cpu to throttle because the VRM's themselves overheat - it won't impact your CPU temps. Your room is very warm, so whilst your temps look high, the lower end is only 20C over ambient which is normal. 35C over ambient seems a little high - increasing case airflow can help with that - does your case include any fans as you need air movement across the board and to vent the heat out the back for optimal cooling. You could also look at investing in a higher TDP cooler (something like a Hyper 212) to help bring the cpu temps down.

With regard to overclocking, that cpu does support overclocking, however the 320 series chipset does not. You need at least a '50' series board (B350, B450 etc) or higher to enable overclocking. That said Ryzen 3000 series cpu's don't overclock much, the best option is just to turn on the 'PBO' function in the bios (which is a type of auto overclock) and leave it at that as that maintains the standard boost behaviour but also increases all core turbo speed a bit. I think you might be able to enable that even on an a320 motherboard so it's only manual overclocking you are missing. I don't expect the change in motherboard to improve the temps. I also don't think VRM temps are going to be an issue with a 3300X as it's only a quad core and doesn't use much power. That said, moving to a decent b450 board will give you much more upgrade potential for the future as B450 boards have support for Ryzen 5000 series cpu's (which are quite a bit faster per clock than 3000 series) as well as all the higher core count options.
 
Dec 10, 2020
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Makes sense. Thank you for the very clear explanation. I have a b450m board being delivered so I'm glad it was a good decision. One last thing, would you reckon I buy an aio or a good air cooler for the cpu considering my environment? Room temps usually stays between 30-35C so i wonder if an aio is a better bet.

Thanks!
 
Makes sense. Thank you for the very clear explanation. I have a b450m board being delivered so I'm glad it was a good decision. One last thing, would you reckon I buy an aio or a good air cooler for the cpu considering my environment? Room temps usually stays between 30-35C so i wonder if an aio is a better bet.

Thanks!
The main advantage of an AIO is that the radiator / fan is setup to blow the hot air out of the case. That might help in your situation if you don't have much airflow (if it's a compact case for example). There are down sides to AIO's though, the pumps can be noisy (not loud but it's quite a different sound to a fan) and they don't provide any cooling for the VRM so it's still a good idea to have a case fan. The pumps can also fail over time as well so make sure to read some reviews if you want to go for the AIO.

I would suggest testing the setup with the new board first and see how you get on.
 
The main advantage of an AIO is that the radiator / fan is setup to blow the hot air out of the case.
...
Or better yet...use cool outside air only to cool the radiator and not be limited by the hot air coming off the GPU. That's a major help for cases with poor air flow.

But IMO the best thing about liquid cooling is you can usually maintain a low fan speed for a long time before the liquid starts to heat up. That makes for a very quiet system when set up right.

But even so, I doubt it's all that much of a benefit for a 3300X, 4 core/8 thread, CPU.
 

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