News Sabrent's Plotripper Chia Plotting SSD Will Outlive Many Of Us

helper800

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For comparison, a typical 2TB consumer TLC drive is good for around 3,000 TBW.
What drive is this referring too? Is this article trying to say the average 2tb drive has 3000 TBW endurance because I do not see how that is the case... Most good 1-2tb NVMe SSDs are 600-1800 TBW not 3k. Please correct me if I am wrong...
 

USAFRet

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What drive is this referring too? Is this article trying to say the average 2tb drive has 3000 TBW endurance because I do not see how that is the case... Most good 1-2tb NVMe SSDs are 600-1800 TBW not 3k. Please correct me if I am wrong...
Samsungs can go up to 4,800, depending on size. And thats just for SATA III.

But also, warranty vs actual operation.
Any good drive will long outlast the warranty period. Age or TBW.
 
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Before long, someone is going to want that for his gaming system.
Lol, Well obviously that was the first thought that crosses our minds when we read the article. Thankfully though, im sure almost all of us realise how stupid that would be :)
 

USAFRet

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Lol, Well obviously that was the first thought that crosses our minds when we read the article. Thankfully though, im sure almost all of us realise how stupid that would be :)
Key word, almost.

We see people here all the time, wanting to merge an ancient system with no M.2/NVMe capability, with a 980 Pro, because - FASTER!
 

InvalidError

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Samsungs can go up to 4,800, depending on size. And thats just for SATA III.
The article implies that a typical 2TB consumer SSD is rated for 3000 TBW. The reality is that typical consumer SSDs like Samsung's 970 EVO line are only rated for 600 total drive writes, which would be 1200 TBW for a 2TB SSD. You have to upgrade to Pro-line SSDs for a good chunk of extra change to double the endurance and still only get 2400 TBW of rated endurance out of a 2TB SSD, still 600 TBW short.
 
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USAFRet

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The article implies that a typical 2TB consumer SSD is rated for 3000 TBW. The reality is that typical consumer SSDs like Samsung's 970 EVO line are only rated for 600 total drive writes, which would be 1200 TBW for a 2TB SSD. You have to upgrade to Pro-line SSDs for a good chunk of extra change to double the endurance and still only get 2400 TBW of rated endurance out of a 2TB SSD, still 600 TBW short.
Oh yeah, the article seems to be very incorrect as to "typical".

But the 8TB 860 Pro warranties at 4,800, the 8TB 870 QVO at 2,880.
 
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PapaCrazy

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The article implies that a typical 2TB consumer SSD is rated for 3000 TBW. The reality is that typical consumer SSDs like Samsung's 970 EVO line are only rated for 600 total drive writes, which would be 1200 TBW for a 2TB SSD. You have to upgrade to Pro-line SSDs for a good chunk of extra change to double the endurance and still only get 2400 TBW of rated endurance out of a 2TB SSD, still 600 TBW short.
If you go for a 980 Pro w/ TLC you get stuck with 600TBW for each 1TB - same as the Evo. Maybe 54,000TBW is overkill, but longevity should be a bigger deal in the market than it is. Samsung was too quick to sacrifice it.
 

Maxxify

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Do they mean that some memory cells in the drive will last 54,000TWB? How could you know it when most of other cells already died?
54PB of writes, yes. It's not most cells, a drive will fail once any one die runs out of spare blocks which are quite limited in number. The drive is smart enough to write to the least-worn cells whenever possible with wear-leveling. It can track the status in a variety of ways.
 
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Olle P

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Sabrent, however, claims that its latest product line offers the "best unit cost for plotting."
I'm curious to find out what metrics they'll use to support that claim.
 

InvalidError

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Sabrent, however, claims that its latest product line offers the "best unit cost for plotting."
I'm curious to find out what metrics they'll use to support that claim.
Considering what plotting Chia implies, the logical "benchmark" would be theoretical total plots created before the SSD dies per dollar, which should be directly proportional to TBWs.
 

InvalidError

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I'm pretty sure that time (to plot) should be a factor as well. Otherwise a plain HDD should be superior to any SSD.
HDDs aren't SSDs, so they don't count on SSD benchmarks. The access time on HDDs and the random-intensive nature of Chia makes HDDs non-viable for plotting.

Also, you can run multiple slower SSDs and at the end of the day, plotting is still CPU-intensive at ~6h per plot using one core each so it doesn't take very many SSDs to max out a 16-cores system.
 

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