Question Samsung 60" TV stopped working need help repairing

Redhornet07

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Dec 17, 2008
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I have a 60 inch Samsung TV (model UN60J6200AFXZA). The power board overheated and a capacitor/resistor on it popped like a firework and burned out. I ordered a new power board (part number BN44-00775A), installed it and the TV worked fine for 40 minutes. The picture started to flicker on and off and the TV wouldn’t turn off. The metal back cover of the TV was really hot, couldn’t touch it and there was the smell of an electrical fire starting. I unplugged it, let it cool and took the back off. The new power board looks fine, no capacitors or resistors blown/bulging and no evidence of charring. There seems to be very little info out there in diagnosing the problem I’m having, let alone fixing it. I’m at the point where I don’t know what to do. The TV is only 4 years old and I really don’t want to drop over $750 or more on a new set.

I don’t know what is wrong with the TV, it seems like it’s drawing too much electricity and overheating, don’t know what would cause it. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

EDIT 3/17/21:
I tried to turn on the TV again and still have the above issue with 2 added ones. Now the volume control doesn't work and when I turn off the TV, the screen stops receiving signal but the LEDs are still on. I have to physically unplug the TV for the LEDs to be off.
 
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tennis2

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Have you heard about baking (literally) PCBs in your oven? ~380F (need to verify if that's the correct temp) for 10 minutes IIRC.

I have an LG TV that all the inputs died on (simultaneously). I couldn't locate the problem and it was destined for the scrap heap, so I figured last-ditch to bake the PCB and viola! Still working today.
 

USAFRet

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Have you heard about baking (literally) PCBs in your oven? ~380F (need to verify if that's the correct temp) for 10 minutes IIRC.

I have an LG TV that all the inputs died on (simultaneously). I couldn't locate the problem and it was destined for the scrap heap, so I figured last-ditch to bake the PCB and viola! Still working today.
Please don't do that in an oven you wish to continue using for food.
 

Redhornet07

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I appreciate the suggestion of baking the PCB, but that isn't the issue. There seems to be a problem where the power board is receiving too much power and thus over heating. I need help diagnosing that issue.
 

Redhornet07

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It is probably overheating, not because of too much in, but too much out. There is something that it is feeding that is shorted.
So how would I figure out where the problem is in terms of where the power board is sending too much power? I'm trying to get info on how to diagnose where the problem is, that's the biggest hurdle. After getting that figured out it will be reallly easy just swapping out faulty components.
 

kanewolf

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So how would I figure out where the problem is in terms of where the power board is sending too much power? I'm trying to get info on how to diagnose where the problem is, that's the biggest hurdle. After getting that figured out it will be reallly easy just swapping out faulty components.
Without detailed schematics, and expected resistance values it would be difficult to impossible. You may be able to buy a service guide that could help you.
You can randomly swap boards. There is no easy answer.
 

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