Samsung Announces SM951-NVMe PCIe SSD; 3D V-NAND Version May Come This Summer

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sc14s

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Feb 21, 2014
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This SSD doesn't support hardware encryption.
You do realize this type of SSD would be going into lower wattage devices correct? Encrypting those devices will likely slow them down immensely if it doesn't have specialized hardware for it. A good example would be try to encrypt an android phone. The vast majority of them do not have the requisite hardware encryption so end up slowing the hell out of your device.
 

crazy1

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NVMe and 3D V-NAND in a M.2 form factor is what I expected the SM951 to be when it was first released earlier this year. Now, it's not coming until later this year. Samsung seems to be milking their lead in the market with both M.2 devices and 3D NAND chips. I guess they couldn't just put all their SSD technologies together in one device and leave no room for growth. Hopefully, they finally have it all integrated in one SSD by the release of Skylake and Windows 10. And don't forget the hardware encryption.
 

lahma

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This SSD doesn't support hardware encryption.
You do realize this type of SSD would be going into lower wattage devices correct? Encrypting those devices will likely slow them down immensely if it doesn't have specialized hardware for it. A good example would be try to encrypt an android phone. The vast majority of them do not have the requisite hardware encryption so end up slowing the hell out of your device.
The SED hardware encryption found on SSDs (such as OPAL 2.0). All of the encryption is handled by a dedicated controller on the SSD itself and is transparent to the OS. It requires no additional CPU cycles for encryption/decryption and has virtually no impact on battery life.
 

mikeangs2004

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This SSD doesn't support hardware encryption.
You do realize this type of SSD would be going into lower wattage devices correct? Encrypting those devices will likely slow them down immensely if it doesn't have specialized hardware for it. A good example would be try to encrypt an android phone. The vast majority of them do not have the requisite hardware encryption so end up slowing the hell out of your device.
That's "not right" substituted by moderator, like previous post stated.
 
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