Samsung Densifies M.2 SSDs With PoP Controller, Forges Ahead With New Spec

Status
Not open for further replies.

Game256

Commendable
Sep 8, 2016
31
0
1,560
7
Is there any info about more concrete 960 release date (like beginning of October or late October)? NewEgg is already accepting pre-orders.
 

CRamseyer

Honorable
Jan 25, 2015
409
0
10,790
3
We honestly have no idea when they will ship. I heard the samples came back to the US the same day we returned but we do not have samples, a spec sheet or release date information yet.
 

Patrick_Bateman

Reputable
Nov 19, 2015
29
0
4,530
0
I don't get why SSDs are so expensive? They are physically smaller and have no moving parts, which hard drives do. Is it because NAND purity has to be very high? Or is it because the vendors just set a price that most consumers would be ok with? Still waiting for a 100$ 1 TB 3D NAND SSD.
 

CRamseyer

Honorable
Jan 25, 2015
409
0
10,790
3
The fabs to make the flash cost 5 billion Dollars and take several years to build. The technology changes roughly every 18 months and each change requires new tools, new processes and so on. Imagine what a car would cost if each year and a half a new design had to come out.
 

Bruce427

Honorable
Jul 31, 2012
74
0
10,630
0
Chris,

Would your expectation be that the new Samsung 400GB EVO 960 will be superior to the 256GB Pro 950 in pretty much every performance parameter?

I had planned on replacing several 256GB Pro 950s with Pro 960s, but Samsung didn't choose to offer a 256GB pro version.
 

rpg1966

Commendable
Sep 27, 2016
1
0
1,510
0
"SSD manufacturers tend to shy away from using 16-die stacks because of manufacturing complexity" ...and "We know that Samsung is already using small F-chips in some 48-layer NAND packages".

Here, is the number of dies in the "stacks", the same as the number of "layers"?

So whilst 16-die stacks are avoided by some, Samsung (and others) are doing 48- or 64-layers?
 

PaulAlcorn

Senior Editor
Editor
Feb 24, 2015
763
125
11,160
0


Each die has 48 layers of cells.

The individual die are stacked, 16 of them.

So, in effect, that would be 768 layers of data cells.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

Distinguished
Aug 23, 2013
866
16
19,365
115
In the enterprise, they already have the U.2 spec to support 2.5" PCIe SSDs. You can fit way more memory in a 2.5" size versus the M.2 2280 size. This new "Small and Dense" form factor will interesting to see how it develops.
 

Brian_R170

Honorable
Jun 24, 2014
288
2
10,785
0
"In contrast to popular belief, the SSD controller is really only a very small part of the BOM (Build Of Materials) cost, with prices projected between $5 to $15 apiece."

I sure hope that means we will soon see NVMe SSD priced the same as SATA SSDs of the same capacity.
 

bit_user

Splendid
Ambassador
The storage medium on hard drives and tapes is just a blank, (relatively) unstructured surface. By comparison, SSDs must have dedicated circuitry fabricated for each cell. That's probably the simplest explanation of why it's been so hard for solid state storage to catch up.

Fab construction and equipment cost is only one factor. It would be interesting to know how much this adds to the cost of each wafer, because it might not even be the largest term.

The other part of wafer cost is the material, energy, and labor needed to fab each mm^2 of die area. Then, multiply that by the number of dies needed for your SSD, scale by the yield, add overhead for testing and packaging, and then you need to get those chips on a board. And don't forget to add in some profit margin for the fab.

Of course, the SSD vendor has hardware & firmware design costs, as well as support, warranty, and advertising. But the structure of those costs is similar to what a mechanical hard disk vendor would face.

Anyway, just take a step back and consider that a typical consumer can buy over 2 trillion little circuits for a bit over $100. Pretty mind-blowing stuff, IMO. (Newegg has 480 GB SSDs for $112. 480 GB * 8 bits per byte / 1.5 bits per cell = 2.56 trillion cell, not counting over provisioning)
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY