Samsung Develops 4Gb DDR3 for 32GB RDIMMs

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nekatreven

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[citation][nom]Pei-chen[/nom]I guess 4GB DDR3 will be as prevalent as 2GB DDR2 sticks meaning the sweet spot for Win 7 at end of life will be 8GB.[/citation]


"Samsung can then double that number using its dual-die packaging technology, giving a potential 32 GB."

^ The way that it is worded (they mention the packaging technology), they seem to be talking about a single stick of RAM with 32gb on it. I think each chip on the ram is 4GB. They probably wouldn't talk about the potential of a stick of RAM in terms of more than one stick because then, up to a point...the potential is just up to how many sticks you buy.

So using 4 of the 8gb workstation sticks, I think you'd be up at 32gb instead of 8.
 

kamel5547

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[citation][nom]nekatreven[/nom]"Samsung can then double that number using its dual-die packaging technology, giving a potential 32 GB."^ The way that it is worded (they mention the packaging technology), they seem to be talking about a single stick of RAM with 32gb on it. I think each chip on the ram is 4GB. [/citation]

Mostly correct..I think everyone is missing the difference between Gb and GB. Each RAM module is made up of severeal chips (now measured in Gb) and the sum total of those chips adds up the modules GB size. Failing to use the proper capitilazation changes the total by a factor of 8 (8 bits in a byte).
 

joex444

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The article is correct, each CHIP is 4Gb. Notice the lowercase b, this means bit. 4Gb = 0.5GB = 512MB. You put 8 on a side of a DIMM, that gives you 4GB. You make a double sided DIMM, you'll get 8GB. The article says that for desktop and workstations, you can get 8GB out of it.

To me it sounds like the 32GB sticks would be for servers only, where you can potentially use more chips. I'm not familiar with their "dual die" manufacturing, but I will venture a guess and say they can stick two dies in one chip, producing an 8Gb chip much like Intel sticks two Core2 Duos into a single package and makes a quad core.
 

nekatreven

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Hmm. Yea...I'm plenty familiar with the distinction and the conversion, but no, I hadn't caught that this was gigabits. In fact I was actually thinking how strange it would look for the whole stick of ram to only have a few chips on it. I've never really seen RAM rated in anything but bytes. Good catch
 

KyleSTL

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Ram modules (also called sticks) are always rated in MBytes and GBytes (technically MiB and GiB, but we won't get into that here). The memory chips themselves are always rated in Mbits and Gbits.
 

enewmen

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[citation][nom]Pei-chen[/nom]I guess 4GB DDR3 will be as prevalent as 2GB DDR2 sticks meaning the sweet spot for Win 7 at end of life will be 8GB.[/citation]
I was looking for the end of life RAM requirement someplace else. It seems then 8 gig is the most Vista/Win7 will ever fully utilize. So, I can put in 8 gigs, LOCK the case side door and forget about upgrading RAM as long as I'm using Vista/Win7. Same as saying 2 gig is the most XP will ever resonably need.
Anyway, thanks for the unexpected help.
 
G

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on mobos for nehalem, thats 3 channel ddr3, your looking at 12GB for the sweetspot, not 8.
 
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