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News Samsung Launches Aggressively-Curved Odyssey G7 Gaming Monitor

remy721

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Aug 22, 2012
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Actually, the answer is No, No, and No, No (again).

It's not an IPS or VA panel, it's a QLED panel, which is like an LED panel (TN) with "Quantum Dot" technology -- basically, a standard backlit LCD panel with a special layer between that allows the pixels to be blocked out completely, allowing for "true" black.

It's also not 4K -- the one the article is about is actually QHD (2560 x 1440) and the G9 is an extreme-wide QHD (basically, two QHD monitors side-by-side). Neither is 4K or "4K+".
 
It's not an IPS or VA panel, it's a QLED panel, which is like an LED panel (TN) with "Quantum Dot" technology -- basically, a standard backlit LCD panel with a special layer between that allows the pixels to be blocked out completely, allowing for "true" black.
According to the prior article linked within this one, these are using VA panels with a quantum dot filter, not TN. The "LED" part of "QLED" is just referring to them using an LED backlight, which are used by all modern IPS, VA and TN panels, all of which are variations of LCD panels. Likely, Samsung just picked the QLED name to be more marketable against OLED in the television space. OLED is a completely different technology though, with each pixel being its own light source.

4K is not exactly ideal for today's gaming screens, as pushing frame rates much above 60fps is a challenge for even today's highest-end graphics cards at that resolution. And even if the next generation of graphics cards improve on that, it will be quickly countered by games becoming more demanding as they target the next generation of console hardware.

So for high-end gaming, high refresh-rate 1440p screens are generally considering a better option at this time. That super-ultrawide 32:9 screen is actually pretty close to 4K though. At 5120 x 1440, it offers more horizontal pixels than 4K, but fewer vertical pixels, and ends up only around 11% short of the total pixels at 4K.
 

bit_user

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Hmm... I hope the price isn't too dear. I've had my eye on the 27", since it was announced. It ticks all the boxes, except I really wasn't looking for such aggressive curvature. I could overlook that, if everything else is good.
 

bit_user

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IPS? No 4K?
Most curved monitors seem to be VA. Samsung is big on VA, especially toward the upper end of their range. IPS still cannot match the static contrast ratio.

And 4k at 240 Hz? Um... no.

Weird that you didn't read the article.
I don't see anywhere in the article that actually says they're VA.

Yes 4K+( 5120 x 1440 ) later when the Odyssey G 9 comes out.
Um, how do you get 4k from that? 4k seems most commonly used to mean 3840x2160. It's referring to the horizontal resolution being nearly 4000 pixels across. Crappy name, but using it to mean 5k x 1.4k seems a stretch too far. They don't even have the same number of pixels (3840x2160 has 12.5% more)!

Regarding the OP's question about 4k, I took it as maybe expressing a question about whether there might be any 4k models in the pipeline, or otherwise remarking at the absense of a 4k model - neither of which are addressed by the article.

If you're going to rebuke people, you might want to just take a second and make sure that you're not even further off the mark than they are.
 
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