News Samsung Plans to Invest $200 Billion in Texas for 11 New Semiconductor Fabs

InvalidError

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I hope Samsung's Texas plans include building its own solar and wind farm to power that stuff to get around the unreliable power grid and a water pipeline from the Mexico Gulf to avoid shutting down from water shortages.
 
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kjfatl

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This seems like a great strategy for Samsung. Fabs in Taiwan and South Korea have the same issue. If a conflict arises between China and any western nation (including Australia and New Zeeland) the fabs near China will most likely be shut down or severely damaged. This current weakness actually makes conflict with China and North Korea more likely. By moving significant production to the US, they have a stable area to operate their fabs for decades and the chances of the Chinese stealing their IP and technology is significantly reduced. This also protects them is North Korea starts firing artillery across the border at the fabs.

Knowing Samsung, their plans most likely include company owned nuclear power stations with solar backup. The power plants will be profitable on their own.
 
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watzupken

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This seems like a great strategy for Samsung. Fabs in Taiwan and South Korea have the same issue. If a conflict arises between China and any western nation (including Australia and New Zeeland) the fabs near China will most likely be shut down or severely damaged. This current weakness actually makes conflict with China and North Korea more likely. By moving significant production to the US, they have a stable area to operate their fabs for decades and the chances of the Chinese stealing their IP and technology is significantly reduced. This also protects them is North Korea starts firing artillery across the border at the fabs.

Knowing Samsung, their plans most likely include company owned nuclear power stations with solar backup. The power plants will be profitable on their own.
But you fail to realise that quite a fair chunk of raw material comes from US’ “unfriendly nation” list. So while you have a lot of fabs in US, the interruption in supply will negate the benefits. Again, you don’t produce chips from thin air. Assuming you managed to produce enough chips, there are many other components to make a PC work. Again, a lot are still produce in China. So in my opinion, as long as these conflicts continue, production of any goods will be impacted.
Furthermore, this is the same Texas where power infrastructure is unreliable, particularly during winter period. Nuclear could be a way to obtain more reliable power source, but there are repercussions and other considerations as well. Nuclear plants if I am not wrong has a limited lifespan, and you need to “clean up” after it expires. It’s not as easy as blowing up the building and burying everything in the sand before building another.
 
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InvalidError

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Nuclear plants if I am not wrong has a limited lifespan, and you need to “clean up” after it expires.
There is no definitive number on how long nuclear plants can last as long as there are no major incidents to ruin them. At least 15 nuclear plants in the USA are in the process of getting approval for license extensions that would push them beyond 80 years.
 
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edzieba

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But you fail to realise that quite a fair chunk of raw material comes from US’ “unfriendly nation” list. So while you have a lot of fabs in US, the interruption in supply will negate the benefits.
The raw materials and mines exist elsewhere to, they are just not operating due to lower profitability. Like with encouraging chip fabs to return to the US through front-loaded investment, the same can be done with raw material mining.
 

Eximo

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Clean up of old Nuclear sites also isn't that bad. Spent fuel rods will sit in the reactor for a time as they cool down. Slowly moved off to the side and eventually taken out and processed into waste. Useful elements are chemically extracted as well depending on the type of reactor. Usually some stable glass ceramic thing they end up making placed inside of a safety rated (think train wreck) sealed module, and typically stored on site since they kind of shut down the waste storage places.

They also don't have to go full scale commercial reactor. There are a few companies pushing micro nuclear as an option. Reactors whose failure mode is "Off" and are basically self contained.

1 MW solar panel on the roof of my office. Does about a third of our power needs on a summer's day. We average around 2 - 3 MW peak consumption. Electric buses are thirsty.
 

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This seems like a great strategy for Samsung. Fabs in Taiwan and South Korea have the same issue. If a conflict arises between China and any western nation (including Australia and New Zeeland) the fabs near China will most likely be shut down or severely damaged. This current weakness actually makes conflict with China and North Korea more likely. By moving significant production to the US, they have a stable area to operate their fabs for decades and the chances of the Chinese stealing their IP and technology is significantly reduced. This also protects them is North Korea starts firing artillery across the border at the fabs.

Knowing Samsung, their plans most likely include company owned nuclear power stations with solar backup. The power plants will be profitable on their own.
Just like Russian aggression came,
when the West was must energy vulnerable/dependent,
and led by weak leadership,

China's most strategic time for aggression,
is before these fabs around the world go online.

I give China 1 year.