Samsung Puts 128 SSDs Into Mass-production

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"Samsung said it will introduce a later this year."

What's a later? Sounds high tech.

Did you mean ladder?
Are they coming out with ladders this year?
Or letter? Are they introducing Samsung Letters?

Well anyway, I heard they will be releasing SSD's later this year too.
This Ladder sounds kewl though.
 

etittel

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SuperTalent already offers a 60GB SSD (in their MasterDrive MX series) for $365, as this newegg link attests: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820609303&Tpk=SuperTalent%2b60%2bGB%2bSSD. My best guess is that we'll see prices for 128 GB in about the same range by the end of this year. BTW, SuperTalent also tells me (I write for Tom's Guide and other publications, just for the record) that they will be launching a new version of this series this week that will offer 100 Mbps write speed and 120 MBps read speed for these drives. Should be interesting!

--Ed--
 
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The article tries to compare SSD speeds with disks in some sustained transfer. In real life an OS is constantly asking a disk to retrieve 8K blocks of data from various tracks and sectors. The truest measure of "disk" performance is therefore not some 100Mbps sustained speed but rather the time the disk takes to retrieve a block/track of data. This is the sum of track seek (which in the case of the WD mentioned above is 4.2ms) + rotational latency (5.5ms) it therefore takes the WD around 10ms for a head to find a block of data on its platters and begin reading it which the OS needs. Typical SSD "seek" times are 0.1ms which is around 100 times faster than the WD. Trust me, there is absolutly no comparison in the real world between any conventional rotating disk and an SSD!
 

etittel

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Dear Brett:

I think the approach derives from standard HD test methodology. I do agree that your point is well-taken, and that such tests don't necessarily reflect the real value of an SSD to a notebook user. But it does make sense to compare how SSDs perform vis-a-vis conventional HDs in the conventional framework, even if it doesn't tell the whole story.

I've been using an SSD in my Dell Latitude 620 notebook for about two months full-time now, and I agree the real benefits come more from things other than sustained read/write speed numbers. How about a 30-second boot into the Vista desktop, a one hour increase in battery life while doing standard productivity, three or four ounces less weight, and lower heat output?

I do get it. Check out my recent Viztaview article "Solid State Drives Benefit Notebook PCs" at http://www.viztaview.com/index.php/Hardware/solid-state-drives.html.

Thanks for posting,
--Ed--
 
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