Question Samsung R530 Bremen motherboard cooling

Jul 21, 2020
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Hi,
I'm wondering if anybody out there has much knowledge of Samsung Bremen motherboards.
I've got a Samsung R530 which is about 10 years old, over the last 12 months it developed a worsening problem where when asked to do much work it would shut itself down. I had a good idea this was due to overheating which was confirmed by a temperature monitor programme which showed little balls of fire next to the various internal temperature readings. I could also prevent it shutting down if I placed a huge fan running at full speed in front of its air intake!
So I went in pursuit of fluff and dust, as I could hear the fan was running ok but suspected its performance was being degraded, which unfortunately on the Samsung R530 means completely dismantling the laptop, which I have now done and was finally rewarded when I unscrewed the fan shroud and found a small collection of fluff inside the shroud and on its cooling fins.
Looking online, the R530 has a bit of a reputation for overheating, so even though the amount of fluff inside the fan shroud wasnt huge, I think it was more than enough to cause the overheating issue.
The fact that this laptop can be pushed into overheating quite easily by a bit of fluff and due to my having the laptop fully disasembled, I had the same thought go through my head that always does when I have reason to disassemble a computer, namely is there any way I can improve the performance of the machine before I put it back together, in this case both in terms of cooling and in outright machine performance.
Looking at the cooling side first, I have investigated the motherboard and its cooling solution a little. The motherboard in my R530 is a BREMEN-C Revision 1.0 BA92-06379 (there is also a revision 1.1 of this board which from a cooling point of view appears identical). The cooling for my motherboard is provided by the fan with a copper prong and attached copper heatsink which sits on top of the CPU socket (it has an i3 330M installed). A picture of this fan configuration can be seen here : https://obrazki.elektroda.pl/3702108700_1473011424.jpg.
What I noticed when disassembling the laptop was that whilst the CPU socket had a fan connected heatsink, what I think is the chipset had only a metal plate (with PCH embossed on it) on top of the chip with no connection to the fan. You can also see this in the picture referenced above, to the right of the CPU and directly below the fan.
Whilst looking into my motherboard I also noticed that there were several other variants of the Bremen motherboard, including ones with more fan attached heatsinks.
There is the BREMEN-UL, shown here : https://cache3.youla.io/files/images...6593452322.jpg.
This board appears to have relocated the cpu socket and chipset and extended the fan attached copper prong to cover both of these and so improve the cooling of the chipset.
There is the Bremen-M Revisions 1.0 - 1.3, an example shown here : https://skylots.org/images/images/n/...2abe49c632.jpg.
This board still appears to have the chipset cooled only by a metal plate but has a second set of cooling fins (located where there is a removable blanking plate on my laptop chassis) and a second metal prong and heatsink cooling an additional chip, which I presume is a discrete GPU?
There is the Bremen-D, shown here : https://media2.24aul.ru/imgs/59e7c19...2-10469720.jpg. There's also the BREMEN-DR motherboard which looks very much the same and can be seen here : https://26.img.avito.st/1280x960/8548848126.jpg.
This board has two copper prongs attached to its fan and has three heatsinks, presumably cooling the CPU, GPU and chipset?
There is the Bremen-VE, shown here : https://ireland.apollo.olxcdn.com/v1...age;s=1000x700.
This board has a fan with two copper prongs and attached heatsinks, one is cooling the CPU socket and the other seems to be cooling the chipset.
There is also a Bremen-L which I can't find a picture of the cooling solution for.
I've found the schematics for the above motherboards which provide some useful information.
So to summarise what I know about the Bremen range of motherboards :

MB Name
Fan Cooling
CPU
Chipset
Platform
Bremen-C​
CPU socket only​
Arrandale​
Ibex Peak(HM55)​
Calpella​
Bremen-UL​
CPU socket & chipset​
Penryn​
Cantiga & ICH9M​
Montevina​
Bremen-M​
CPU and separate GPU?​
Arrandale​
Ibex Peak(HM55)​
Calpella​
Bremen-D​
CPU, chipset & GPU?​
AMD Caspian​
AMD RX881 + SB710​
Tigris Platform Park-XT M2​
Bremen-VE​
CPU socket & chipset​
?​
?​
?​
Bremen-L​
?​
Penryn​
Cantiga & ICH9M​
Montevina​
Bremen-2L​
CPU and separate GPU?​
Arrandale​
Ibex Peak(HM55)​
Calpella​

Checking these architectures I believe the Arrandale is the most advanced?
The I/O ports on these motherboards from an initial look all seem to be in identical locations which suggests it would fit in my R530 chassis (although I did see a board seller on ebay mentioning for one of the boards some sort of keyboard socket difference, I'd have to look into that further before making a decision).
I was considering moving to a separate CPU and GPU in the Bremen-M, as this would presumably reduce the heat on the CPU socket as the GPU component was separate, but I presume this board is meant for a Gaming chassis and the separate GPU would overheat in a business laptop chassis (presuming there were no issues fitting it in)?
However if I want to have both CPU socket and chipset cooling, the only option seems to be the Bremen-UL, which is a step back from the Arrandale to the Penryn architecture?
So wondering if anybody has a view on what I see as the potential options :
  1. Stick with my Bremen-C motherboard with a renewed thermal paste (I see cryonaut grizzly is rated).
  2. Move to separate CPU and GPU in Bremen-M or Bremen-2L?
  3. Step back in architecture to Bremen-UL in order to have CPU socket and chipset cooling?
  4. Any aftermarket fan or heatsink upgrades that are available, although I've looked and cant find anything.
I have experience of building desktop PC's, but little experience with laptops so may have taken an overly simplified view of the above, am happy to be put straight on anything I've said thats wrong.
 
Jul 21, 2020
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Since this is an older mobo and you've already disassembled the laptop, replace the thermal paste between the CPU and CPU heatsink. That should fix the problem.
I've arrived at the same conclusion as you suggest, that my best option is to stick with the Bremen-C motherboard.

The only other option that seemed like it might be a good idea was moving to a Bremen-M, however for completion of the point for anybody else looking along similar lines, whilst my laptop chassis has a removable blanking plate that would allow air for the additional set of fins on the fan, on further inspection I can see that the Bremen-M as well as having all the same connectors as the Bremen-C also has a PCI Express slot and an additional USB/ESATA port in between the HDMI and USB ports. This would mean I would have to cut out additional holes in the case of the laptop in order to accomodate the Bremen-M, which I dont think I really want to do!

So having settled on staying with the Bremen-C board I am of course going to upgrade its drive to an SSD as probably the biggest impact upgrade possible, but I am also looking at potentially upgrading the CPU.
Currently it has an i3-330M installed, which I see has a TDP of 35W (https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us...-2-13-ghz.html).
Looking at the list of Arrandale processors (https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us...e.html#@Mobile) I get the impression that the Intel® Core™ i7-640M Processor (https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us...-2-80-ghz.html) is the fastest one for the Arrandale architechture and it also includes integrated graphics? This also has a TDP of 35W and is also a PGA 988 processor.

Am I reading that right and does that mean it will work in the Bremen-C motherboard or are there any other factors I need to consider and if so how do I check them? Thanks for any help.
 

tennis2

Dignified
That reasoning is sound for aftermarket desktop mobos (Asus, Gigabyte, MSI, AsRock, EVGA, Biostar, etc) and you can look up the CPU support list for a given board from one of those manufacturers very easily, but for OEM machines, my general advice is to stick with CPUs that were options from the manufacturer for that machine. Even then, I'm not sure if laptops even follow that conservative stance.

Also on laptops, if the CPU is BGA (common) and not socketed, you're out of luck.
 

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