Samsung Unleashes a Roomy DDR4 256GB RAM

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stdragon

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Apr 5, 2018
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"Unfortunately, X399 motherboards are only certified to support up to 128GB"

Why is that a MB has to be "certified" to a *capacity* when what really matters is the CPU, RAM clocking and timings/latency? The only limitations that a MB should have with regards to capacity is the amount of DIMM slots available.
 

DavidC1

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This is not the case. When the capacity gets really high, it has to make sacrifices in other areas, like performance. Getting the many chips on a DIMM to run at a certain frequency is harder than doing it with less.

Also certification reduces headache the manufacturer has to deal with when a customer calls in and say its not compatible, and possible additional modifications the board needs to guarantee compatibility.

Interesting, that would render Intel 3DXPOINT technology irrelevant. That is quite interesting to see that RAM is maybe still the way to go.
Actually 3D XPoint DIMMs will be available in 128GB/256GB/512GB sizes, are nonvolatile, and cost less per GB. Plus, the total capacity of the system is going to be Intel DIMM + DRAM DIMM.

So in case of a dual socket system with 2 DIMMs per channel using Intel DIMMs, the potential capacity is:

DRAM = 256GB x 6 channels x 2 sockets = 3 TB
Intel DIMM = 512GB x 6 channels x 2 sockets = 6GB
Total = 9TB
 

jimmysmitty

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The board has to handle the traces and power delivery. Its not just a simple run of traces from socket to slot and done.



In no way does this even compare to 3DXPoint. This is still volatile memory. 3DXPoints whole purpose is to utilize the advantages of NAND for memory and make it non-volatile.

This just means more capacity for high end servers.
 

Tanyac

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If DDR5 is just around the corner (https://www.pcgamer.com/ddr5-memory-is-twice-as-fast-as...), with RAM prices as much as 3 times what they were in 2016, why would you spend anything on this DDR4?

I get that a 2019 release probably won't translate to mainstream availability until 2021, but we're almost at the end of 2018 now.
 

yuhong

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"Although Samsung's 256GB module is clearly aimed at servers, it's likely just a matter of time before this capacity makes its way to the consumer end."
RDIMM and LRDIMM will probably always be Xeons etc only.
 

Zaporro

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Ah, a live decision, would you choose to take a long to buy house of your dream and live there with loved ones? Or will you choose the 256GB ram module to bask in its glory while you live under a bridge.
So first Samsung and every other RAM manufacturer rip off millions of customers with their collusion and price fixing scheme and now they blow all that money on useless 256GB modules that will find use at 1% of use cases...
 


In this case and almost all cases today it is the memory controller that is the limiting factor. It may be said the motherboard only supports xx memory which is a bit misleading but very true since said motherboard usually only accepts CPU's that have memory controllers that support the same amount of memory. If the memory controller could recognize 256GB DIMM's then you would be right you could bypass the motherboard limitations but in reality the memory controllers limit is the same limit as the motherboard.
 


My assumption is that 99% of the 256GB DIMM's will be ECC enabled sitting in high density servers in data centers. You know like Amazon AWS servers used for hosting virtual machines etc. They will sell quite a lot of these higher capacity DIMM's in the server space.
 

danlw

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So when you die and your life flashes before your eyes, how much of it do you want to not have 256GB of RAM? JUST BUY IT!
 
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