[SOLVED] Saving energy.

Jun 1, 2021
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Does the size of the motherboard matter?
I'm trying to save even if its only 5 watts.
micro-atx vs. atx.
 
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Then the software does also contribute to power usaage.
  • Web browsers without ad filters (many ads are videos and cause the gpu to heat).
  • Constantly streaming - this cause network components to also get warm.
  • HDD usage. SSD drives usually spend less power but more expensive.
  • A modern hdd can usually be configured to less noise == also longer seek time - I guess this setting can save some few joules per day (but I don't know in fact)
  • The PSU efficiency. There is some wattage to save on during its lifetime.
  • OS power settings - make it turn off screen and go suspend if computer not used for say 5 minutes.
Also - since a computer is a device that doesn't use wattage evenly distributed over time, it's kind of no point of "save 5 watts" - because then you must ask yourself when that rule should apply (may provide more questions than answers)? Rather asking about saving energy in watt-hours is a measurement unit that fits the problem. Because then you can use a watt-meter (need to spend money so maybe not) to see how much energy your computer spends during a day.
 
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Jun 1, 2021
26
0
30
0
Then the software does also contribute to power usaage.
  • Web browsers without ad filters (many ads are videos and cause the gpu to heat).
  • Constantly streaming - this cause network components to also get warm.
  • HDD usage. SSD drives usually spend less power but more expensive.
  • A modern hdd can usually be configured to less noise == also longer seek time - I guess this setting can save some few joules per day (but I don't know in fact)
  • The PSU efficiency. There is some wattage to save on during its lifetime.
  • OS power settings - make it turn off screen and go suspend if computer not used for say 5 minutes.
Also - since a computer is a device that doesn't use wattage evenly distributed over time, it's kind of no point of "save 5 watts" - because then you must ask yourself when that rule should apply (may provide more questions than answers)? Rather asking about saving energy in watt-hours is a measurement unit that fits the problem. Because then you can use a watt-meter (need to spend money so maybe not) to see how much energy your computer spends during a day.
not trying to save money. im trying to build 8 low wattage computers (below 300w each) to play simple games like minecraft, LoL, and like Team Fortress 2. (old games) sorry should have stated my purpose.
 

King_V

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For simple games like that . . well, I have an ASRock A300W DeskMini running an old Athlon 200GE, but the next generation of it is the X300W, which supports the 5600G and 5700G.

The W version comes with wi-fi.

https://www.asrock.com/nettop/AMD/DeskMini X300 Series/index.asp

Get some laptop RAM (yes, these are desktop PCs, but they use laptop RAM), storage, and a CPU, and you're good to go.

Note as well, that there are also low-power variants of those two CPUs. The 5600G and 5700G are rated at 65W, whereas the 5600GE and 5700GE are rated at 35W. The GE versions have a lower base clock speed, but the boost speed is the same. Though, I think their performance is a little less than the G versions because they proably thermal-throttle more quickly to stay in the 35W envelope.

I'm also given to understand that you can use the Wraith Stealth cooler that comes with the 5600/5700 in these units rather than the small one that comes with the X300, but you have to remove the shroud at the top of the Stealth cooler. I haven't tried it myself, so, don't hold me to that. I've seen posts online with the A300W that it works, though.
 
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In addition to GPU
not trying to save money. im trying to build 8 low wattage computers (below 300w each) to play simple games like minecraft, LoL, and like Team Fortress 2. (old games) sorry should have stated my purpose.
In addition to the other features to look for to save energy another is the VRM design.

Most of the older B450 boards used discrete FET's while many of the newer B550 motherboard designs use DrMOS and smart power stages that run with up to 90% efficiency. Since the VRM is the circuit that provides power to the CPU that makes it the largest contribution by far of the motherboard's contribution to overall system power consumption. Smart power stages in particular can make for a considerable difference with 10 to 15 watts improvement at heavy processing loads.
 
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