News Scientists Suggest Using Graphene Heatpipes for 3.5x Better Performance

Co BIY

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Jun 18, 2015
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I think the limiting factor is the fin-to-air interface rather than the ability of the heat pipes to transfer but maybe I'm wrong.

I would like to see someone try a cooler with a textured surface or micro perforations on the aluminum fins that increases effective surface area and air contact.

I've often wondered why the heatpipes aren't soldered to the fins 360 degrees around but as the article notes air coolers are already quiet effective and cost efficient.
 

nofanneeded

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Sep 29, 2019
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What we need is a new standardized form factor for the CPU Place that is FIXED . once this is done , it will be very easy to make heatpipes coolers span to the rear of the Case and uses 120/140 fan to mount a very huge radiator(fins) that continue from the rear of the case to the middle of the motherboard allowing for a very huge cooler to be mounted on the case itself and not on the board.
 

CerianK

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Nov 7, 2008
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I think the limiting factor is the fin-to-air interface rather than the ability of the heat pipes to transfer but maybe I'm wrong.
Much of the heat has been extracted before the last few cooling fins, so better heat pipes will help noticeably.

However, to support your statement, there is a molecular layer of (mostly) nitrogen adsorbed onto the surface of the fins which has a significant effect on the fin-to-air thermal conductivity. It seems like I read a research brief on some attempt to directly address that issue (short of using higher fan RPM).

Taken together, an improved heat sink could be half the size (perhaps leaving more room for an integral Peltier/TEC, if you don't mind making a lot more heat, though the current TEC designs are not terribly bulky).
 

AnimeMania

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Dec 8, 2014
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I wonder if the CPU manufacturers could use Graphene to make a small heatpipe cap to place over the bare CPU chips (there seems to be a ton of empty space inside), replacing the solder and lid. This would probably function much better than even a delidded CPU would.
 

InvalidError

Titan
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However, to support your statement, there is a molecular layer of (mostly) nitrogen adsorbed onto the surface of the fins which has a significant effect on the fin-to-air thermal conductivity.
The air you breathe is already 75-80% nitrogen, so there effectively is a "film of nitrogen" on everything exposed to typical air.
 

CerianK

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The air you breathe is already 75-80% nitrogen, so there effectively is a "film of nitrogen" on everything exposed to typical air.
Yes, a "film of nitrogen" is adsorbed on to most or all surfaces exposed to atmosphere. The question is how to minimize the thickness and/or strength of the adsorbed layer to improve heat transfer to air that is freely moving. I wish I could find the article I was thinking of, but here is an image that might help to illustrate the issue: Multi-Layer Adsorption
 

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