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Seagate Backup Plus 8TB External HDD Review

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BalintLToth

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I want to, but I just don’t trust HDD anymore. 2 WD my passports broke down on me recently. One was working for 2.5 years the other for 3 months. I’m saving for SSD so there wouldn’t be mechanical failures.
 

joex444

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"The Backup Plus 6TB offers the best value when you divide dollars by gigabytes" is a really weird way to phrase it. Often times in sciences we would say what the units represent -- cost divided by capacity. Sometimes we don't, like with cars we have miles per gallon when we really talk about fuel efficiency.
 

Flying-Q

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I used to be a die-hard Seagate fan, but over the last few years in the shop I have seen too many of their products fail in data-destructive ways, causing disruption, delays and costs to customers. I have lost faith in their products. Recently, I have read some reviews from BackBlaze that echo my experience, so for me, it does not matter how fancy the software package with this drive is, I will not buy or recommend one.
 

turkey3_scratch

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Seems fine to me. x amount of money for z gigabytes instead of z gigabytes for x amount of money.
 

DrakeFS

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Honestly when you pass 4TB you would probably be better served by a NAS than a USB attached drive. If you need 8TB for backup purposes, I would suggest a NAS with 3 4TB drives in Raid 5. Loosing 8TBs of data because of a single drive failure would really suck. Also, use at least a powerline filter between your HDDs and the wall socket. Dirty Power kills HDDs. I am disappointed that this unit does not have a network port but I understand why (Seagate does not want to cannibalize their NAS segment).

Still though the best price per TB I have found is a Seagate 5TB @ $26\TB ($130) while this 8TB comes in @ $28.75\TB.
 

sansari786

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May be I missed it. I don't see any mention of the actual Hard drive specs. Is it He or something else. I miss the time where the reviewers would actually pop open the enclosure and show screen shots of the drives etc.... now most of the pics seem to come straight from the product marketing materials.
 

DrakeFS

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May be I missed it. I don't see any mention of the actual Hard drive specs. Is it He or something else. I miss the time where the reviewers would actually pop open the enclosure and show screen shots of the drives etc.... now most of the pics seem to come straight from the product marketing materials.
I do not think it would matter, I know Seagate mixed 5400rpm and 7200rpm drives in their 4TB externals (same make, model and price).
 

jimmysmitty

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SSDs have their own limitations and issues. Right now most modern SSDs have very low P/E cycles compared to older SSDs. This should change when Intel and Micron start shipping their new 3D stacked NAND and other companies do as well.

The funny thing is that mechanically HDDs tend not to fail as much as they do due to the PCB burning up or the platters corrupting blocks.



It depends on if they bought it or if it was a review sample. A lot of sites get samples to do reviews in and sometimes limitations are given. Much like with new CPUs, sometimes Intel or AMD might give TH/Anand etc a CPU early on to do testing with but only to a certain point.
 

texastim65

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Mar 1, 2013
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If you build your own this type of product makes very little sense when you can set up a RAID 1 in about 1 minute for far less cost. I've done this for the past 10 years and it's saved me on several occasions when a drive failed as it was simple to install another one and tell the RAID to rebuild itself.

It's really only for laptop users or people who buy pre-built systems from Dell.
 

jimmysmitty

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Or if they want a central data hub that any system can access instead of having it in their PC. It is easier to create a NAS and share it than to share out from your PC.
 

samopa

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How about its reliability ? I'd used several external HDD as "cheap" backup storage on our server. But many of them not too reliable when they have to operate 24/7.
If this can operate 24/7 in one year without hiccup, I will surely jump to it.
 

AndrewJacksonZA

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Often times in sciences we would say what the units represent -- cost divided by capacity. Sometimes we don't, like with cars we have miles per gallon when we really talk about fuel efficiency.
Another common measure is litres per 100km.

Tomayto, tomahto. ¯\_(?)_/¯
 

bigstonebang

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Jan 15, 2013
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But can you Shuck it? And what model drive is inside? That's all I want to know from a TomsHardware review of a external hard drive
 

heliomphalodon

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How's the airflow through that flat enclosure? At least with the vertical (and not, IMHO, unstable) WD MyBook series there's some hope of convective cooling.
 

jamesltoa4

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While the drive reviewed may be fast and good, the problems for other purchasers include:
The drive inside the box is not specified - According to Seagate Support that's proprietary Confidential - and only when you connect up a box can you find out what drive is in it. Additionally, according to Seagate support the drive runs at the interface speed - 5Gb/sec - Users don't need to know what the spin speed, cache or data density is. - The data sheets for Seagate drives now seem to state what sizes are available and how many come in a shipped pallet.
Also - you won't know until you have started using it if the drive in the box is rated for a maximum of 2400 hours usage, 55TB maximum usage and for 8TB of use, expecting at least 1 unreadable block ( meaning the set of files containing that bad block will be unusable) - And the drive will probably be rated as adequate to be given a 1 year LIMITED warrantee (or if you're in the EU, suddenly the drive is good enough to be sold in a box that's labelled as 2 year LIMITED warrantee.

I was looking for some USB connected boxes that I could recommend as good for backups - but gave up with Seagate as the best detail I could determine was that you should expect any USB enclosure to contain a drive that, according to Seagate is NOT-FIT-FOR-PURPOSE if you are looking for a backup device for a years usage.

And - if the drive electrics do stop working - and get a nice EMPTY drive back, you'll probably have to send Seagate your drive with all that backed-up data on the platters so they can replace the control board and ship the drive out as a factory refurb.

Yes - you guessed it - I'm not happy with Seagate sales, marketing, and support - even if the drives do last for more than 2400 hours usage.
 

Dugimodo

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If you build your own this type of product makes very little sense when you can set up a RAID 1 in about 1 minute for far less cost. I've done this for the past 10 years and it's saved me on several occasions when a drive failed as it was simple to install another one and tell the RAID to rebuild itself.

It's really only for laptop users or people who buy pre-built systems from Dell.
RAID is not a backup. It only protects you from a drive failure and not from accidental deletion, file corruption, viruses, etc. If you are only going to have a single backup solution an external drive is far superior in every way to RAID. The only advatage RAID has is lack of ongoing effort.
 

hst101rox

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I bet this Seagate makes really loud seeking noises when you slowly tilt the drive, like other Seagate drives. Drive from other manufactures do not have this behavior. Even happens with their mobile hard drives.
 
I use a 4TB WD MY CLOUD, with an attached 4TB WD Elements.

It's attached to the router (thus entire network) and it does a backup every day, and will tell me if there are any problems.

HDD's are fine provided you have planned for failure.
 

chenw

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Any reason why anyone would want to get this drive over getting an internal 8TB (ST8000AS0002) with a separate external enclosure? The review doesn't say if this drive's SATA to USB translator is simply attached or if it is soldered onto the drive.

If it is the latter, that would be another reason not to go for the backup plus, since it's another mode of failure (failure of the translator chip) that would render the drive useless.
 

jimmysmitty

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Why would you tilt a spinning, active HDD? That is a very bad idea as it could cause damage to the drive if the heads skip or even get misaligned. You should never move an active HDD.
 
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One of the problems with some newer external drives, often marketed as backup solutions, is the software they offer for backup, particularly, the terms the end user must agree to in order to use the software. Somehow, I've yet to see a review that mentions these caveats when it comes to Seagate or WD.

I've never owned a seagate external drive, but from what I understand, their backup software EULA, which must be agreed to in order to use, isn't much different from WD's (if that's incorrect, please let me know). I recently RMA'd a 2Tb WD My Book before using it, precisely because I found the EULA contents of their backup smartware to be quite unreasonable. The smartware will indeed automatically backup files, sys images, etc. What users who are particularly quick to click on agree boxes may not know, however, is that in using this software, they're sharing info with the manufacturer they may have otherwise chosen not to, had they taken the time to read the agreement.

Perusing the smartware EULA, the legalese makes it plain the end user must agree to share all info on their system to be backed up to their external drive, including potentially sensitive personal info (everything from phone #'s, CC #'s, contact/friend info, browsing preferences/history, shopping and travel habits, you name it, with WD. The EU's profile is updated regularly, based upon how often info is backed up on drive, as I recall.

A numbered list in the EULA privacy section explains how the company will use the end user's private info, the very last entry of which, finally, says: "however the company deems appropriate". This seems counter-intuitive, to say the least, for a product marketed as a backup solution. Profitable for WD maybe, though not so much for the end user (unless endless spam, unsolicited calls, etc, is something desired by the end user). In effect, users agree to "phone home" to the manufacturer regularly, adding to an ever growing profile of private info which the company profits from in any way they, in their own words, "deem appropriate".


While the drive can be formatted, thus removing the smartware file found on it, allowing you to use it as a regular blank drive, there are other external drives available which offer far better quality construction, e.g one that at least has an aluminum enclosure. I found there are far better options available for my needs, and I'd say the same for those considering the product reviewed in this article. For an 8 TB solution, you'd likely do better going with a NAS. Or, in any case, a better quality external drive, with separately purchased backup software if need be, which allows you to control your own system info, and keep it as, well, yours. Just my 2c.
 

jamesltoa4

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Yes -

If YOU agree to terms that whatever YOU put on the device can be used by others WILL probably put you into a situation where you have breached the law by failing to maintain the data SECURELY and in such a manner that it will NOT be released to others without the specific agreement of the people or organisations that data is about, or the property of, or would allow others to breach their security.

Look for the 'Agree'er to acquire a criminal record, face fines of £10,000 and maybe up to a years jail for each offence - and because of that criminal record, then become unable to the get a visa for entry to places such as the USA.

Still - at least YOU will NOT be ceding the ownership of that data to others - - have you checked the terms of edlinkin, facebook utube and other social interaction, birhdaycard, and picture sharing/processing/distributing organisations.
 

hst101rox

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Maybe if someone wants to move an external desktop drive in a different spot on the floor or table.
There is verification that the heads are reading/writing to the correct track with marker data (don't know official name).
It is fine if you do it slowly. The angular acceleration on the platters is very minimal and you'll find the SMART to be perfect still. Desktop drives are delicate as you know. Loud seeking because I think the drive stops ramping acceleration and deceleration curves because it goes into robust mode or something.

Mobile drives are tough, they are designed to handles tilts. Like a hard drive in the original ipod, laptop drives. I regularly keep my laptop on, fold it up, put against my side and walk around and put it back down on a table.. SMART on my Samsung M9T is still perfect, doesn't care. But a seagate mobile drive makes the loud seeking noises too when tilting or if it detects vibration.
I think it is designed that way on purpose, whereas other manufactures do not.




 

ron baker

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External drives are the. Shiltz end of the stick. They are designed for occasional use, at best.A desktop drive in your own enclosure will have a longer gtee ..especially wd black or seagate enterprise . This looks as good as any others

 
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