News Seagate Halts Barracuda Pro HDDs: A Replacement Is Coming

Meh. This was/is inevitable.
As motherboards with multiple M.2 sockets become more and more common, and performance NVMe drives, at capacities 2TBs and above, are going on sale for 10¢/GB, spindle hard drive production will continue to slow down. I know traditional HDD production won't go away for at least 10+ years but the shift is already starting.

Just two days ago, I picked up a performance 2TB NVMe for $199!
 

pixelpusher220

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Meh. This was/is inevitable.
As motherboards with multiple M.2 sockets become more and more common, and performance NVMe drives, at capacities 2TBs and above, are going on sale for 10¢/GB, spindle hard drive production will continue to slow down. I know traditional HDD production won't go away for at least 10+ years but the shift is already starting.

Just two days ago, I picked up a performance 2TB NVMe for $199!
Much like car manual transmissions are going the way of the dodo. Maybe as a niche, but you'll pay more for that niche.

Me thinks the mongo drive segment (12+ GB) should still maintain a healthy demand though
 

mwestall

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Meh. This was/is inevitable.
As motherboards with multiple M.2 sockets become more and more common, and performance NVMe drives, at capacities 2TBs and above, are going on sale for 10¢/GB, spindle hard drive production will continue to slow down. I know traditional HDD production won't go away for at least 10+ years but the shift is already starting.

Just two days ago, I picked up a performance 2TB NVMe for $199!
Hmm, I just picked up a 16TB Exos enterprise for £280. That's £17.50/TB, Vs $99/TB. Plus, I'd need 8 nvme slots, I have 8 of these 16TB inside my case along with a pair of nvme for boot and scratch. All flash would be utterly unaffordable and physically impossible. So. I guess a long path still for spinning rust.
 
Yup. The bigger ones will be the last to go, along with the bigger SAS drives/NASs in the commercial market. Although, all-SSD commercial NASs are pretty commonplace now. Once those 8TB+ NVMe drives become readily available, at reasonable pricing, many home users that only need 3-6TBs of storage space will probably move to SSD-only.

Over the next 5 years we'll see small traditional HDDs all but disappear, unless they can make the new HAMR drives something like 2¢/GB or less.
 

salgado18

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Feb 12, 2007
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Yup. The bigger ones will be the last to go, along with the bigger SAS drives/NASs in the commercial market. Although, all-SSD commercial NASs are pretty commonplace now. Once those 8TB+ NVMe drives become readily available, at reasonable pricing, many home users that only need 3-6TBs of storage space will probably move to SSD-only.

Over the next 5 years we'll see small traditional HDDs all but disappear, unless they can make the new HAMR drives something like 2¢/GB or less.
Maybe. But I still see a market for big HDDs in the future, even for home users. Smartphones can already record 4k videos, which take up a lot of space. Give a user one of those and some kids, and a drive can fill up really fast with all the party and travel videos. For this kind of storage, an SSD is a waste of money IMO.
 

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