Question Seeking a replacement for gigabyte GA-970A-UD3 motherboard Rev 1.1 compatible with existing components if possible.

Sep 7, 2022
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Built a PC over a decade ago for gaming and in the last year or so it's showing annoying problems related to hardware.
I mostly use it for email, web surfing and some gaming.

The components on the motherboard CPU, Graphics card etc. are:

AMD Phenom II X6 1035T processor 2.60 GHz

8 GB Corsair Vengeance memory

Radeon HD 6870 graphics card

Windows 7 Home Premium Service pack 1 64-bit



So I'd like to try a new motherboard with an AM3+ socket but the existing one is out of date and only available used at a ridiculous price.

My only question is would a newer motherboard work with the existing components, and if so, which one? (This where I'm unsure.)

Ideally would like it to boot up with few problems.

Thanks for any help.

Gerry Murphy
 
Aug 3, 2022
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I'm still running an AM3 system with the MSI 990FXA Gamming mobo with an FX 8350 in it and it's a great system for it's time. I did run it with the Phenom II X6 1055T before the 8350 and it ran great then as well. There is a lot of CPU options for that motherboard.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
So I'd like to try a new motherboard with an AM3+ socket but the existing one is out of date and only available used at a ridiculous price.

My only question is would a newer motherboard work with the existing components, and if so, which one? (This where I'm unsure.)

Ideally would like it to boot up with few problems.

Thanks for any help.

Gerry Murphy
No, unfortunately, all AM3+ motherboards are going to be used ones. The best you might find is a decade-old one still in the box that has been rotting in a warehouse for a long time, which would be actually worse than a known working one. This platform has been dead for a very long time. If it's a ridiculous price, you're best off saving up for something modern; it's hard to justify putting much money into this.
 
Sep 7, 2022
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Youll have to look at the used AM3+ market, there arent any reasonably priced new boards out there, all have been severely marked up.
Are there other socket options for my cpu? Except for the mobo everything else works well.
I could easily reuse the other components except the CPU.
 
Sep 7, 2022
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No, unfortunately, all AM3+ motherboards are going to be used ones. The best you might find is a decade-old one still in the box that has been rotting in a warehouse for a long time, which would be actually worse than a known working one. This platform has been dead for a very long time. If it's a ridiculous price, you're best off saving up for something modern; it's hard to justify putting much money into this.
Would a different socket be compatible with my CPU?
 
My only question is would a newer motherboard work with the existing components, and if so, which one?
Ideally would like it to boot up with few problems.
New motherboard also means - new cpu and new ram.
Your old system is too outdated.

New motherboard will most likely also require reinstallation of windows.

Except for the mobo everything else works well.
Can you describe issues with your existing system?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Would a different socket be compatible with my CPU?
Nope. As I said, this entire platform's been about dead for a decade. It might have lasted a few more years, but AM3+ almost ruined AMD for consumer CPUs.

Except for the mobo everything else works well.
How did you diagnose that everything is working well except for the motherboard or that it was the motherboard in the first place? You can't test a motherboard is working properly without a working CPU and you can't test a CPU is working without a working motherboard.
 
Sep 7, 2022
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Found a replacement motherboard locally on craigslist so, once I get that this issue should be resolved.
Nope. As I said, this entire platform's been about dead for a decade. It might have lasted a few more years, but AM3+ almost ruined AMD for consumer CPUs.



How did you diagnose that everything is working well except for the motherboard or that it was the motherboard in the first place? You can't test a motherboard is working properly without a working CPU and you can't test a CPU is working without a working motherboard.
Not that it matters but the machine does in fact boot up and runs fine, except it won't connect to the internet because of a socket failure.
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
Found a replacement motherboard locally on craigslist so, once I get that this issue should be resolved.

Not that it matters but the machine does in fact boot up and runs fine, except it won't connect to the internet because of a socket failure.
By socket failure, do you mean the on-board ethernet port? If so, you can disable that in the BIOS and install a stand alone network adapter for next to nothing.
 
Jul 6, 2022
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i used to have AMD combo, and i had issues with heat - most stable mobo i found is ga 970a ds3p with fx8300.
ps: i still needed to put a fan on top of north and south bridge to cool things.
 
Built a PC over a decade ago for gaming and in the last year or so it's showing annoying problems related to hardware.
I mostly use it for email, web surfing and some gaming.

The components on the motherboard CPU, Graphics card etc. are:

AMD Phenom II X6 1035T processor 2.60 GHz

8 GB Corsair Vengeance memory

Radeon HD 6870 graphics card

Windows 7 Home Premium Service pack 1 64-bit



So I'd like to try a new motherboard with an AM3+ socket but the existing one is out of date and only available used at a ridiculous price.

My only question is would a newer motherboard work with the existing components, and if so, which one? (This where I'm unsure.)

Ideally would like it to boot up with few problems.

Thanks for any help.

Gerry Murphy
i'm not sure where you're located but Newegg has some 990 and 970 (AM3+/AM3) motherboards for what seems reasonable prices. Starting around $59 US and up for used, "refurbished", and new.

That platform (AM3+) is definitely out-moded, but PhenomII even more so. Even FX processors are preferable IMO, mainly because they support more advanced instruction set (some games won't play on Phenom II systems). I just recently dusted off my son's old FX-6300 system and popped in the RX 480 board I had after upgrading my GPU. I am pleasantly surprised and playing Red Dead Redemption 2 at 1080p/60hz and reasonably high settings now that it supports FSR 2.0. If your needs aren't demanding, a decent AM3+ system does still have useful life in it.

BTW: everyone hates on FX processors and they are a bit of a dog when run stock. But they're overclockable like nobody's business whereas Phenom's aren't. That FX-6300 is perfectly stable at 4.6Ghz and could easily do more with better cooling. You do need a decent enough motherboard to do it...especially for the 8 BD core variety...but when overclocked even that far it handily outperforms a Phenom II CPU.
 
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Sep 7, 2022
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i'm not sure where you're located but Newegg has some 990 and 970 (AM3+/AM3) motherboards for what seems reasonable prices. Starting around $59 US and up for used, "refurbished", and new.

That platform (AM3+) is definitely out-moded, but PhenomII even more so. Even FX processors are preferable IMO, mainly because they support more advanced instruction set (some games won't play on Phenom II systems). I just recently dusted off my son's old FX-6300 system and popped in the RX 480 board I had after upgrading my GPU. I am pleasantly surprised and playing Red Dead Redemption 2 at 1080p/60hz and reasonably high settings now that it supports FSR 2.0. If your needs aren't demanding, a decent AM3+ system does still have useful life in it.

BTW: everyone hates on FX processors and they are a bit of a dog when run stock. But they're overclockable like nobody's business whereas Phenom's aren't. That FX-6300 is perfectly stable at 4.6Ghz and could easily do more with better cooling. You do need a decent enough motherboard to do it...especially for the 8 BD core variety...but when overclocked even that far it handily outperforms a Phenom II CPU.
What does the 970 mean in the nomenclature? My board is by Gigabyte but I see some of these are by MSI. Is this a case of sellers slapping their brand on hardware they only sell? I see that a lot with GPUs.

What do you estimate to be the likelihood of successfully moving the components to another mobo, especially if it's not Gigabyte.

BTW, I only use this machine for utility purposes, email, online shopping and bill paying, etc.

Thanks.
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
What does the 970 mean in the nomenclature? My board is by Gigabyte but I see some of these are by MSI. Is this a case of sellers slapping their brand on hardware they only sell? I see that a lot with GPUs.

What do you estimate to be the likelihood of successfully moving the components to another mobo, especially if it's not Gigabyte.

BTW, I only use this machine for utility purposes, email, online shopping and bill paying, etc.

Thanks.
The 970 refers to the motherboard chipset.
 
What does the 970 mean in the nomenclature? My board is by Gigabyte but I see some of these are by MSI. Is this a case of sellers slapping their brand on hardware they only sell? I see that a lot with GPUs.

What do you estimate to be the likelihood of successfully moving the components to another mobo, especially if it's not Gigabyte.

BTW, I only use this machine for utility purposes, email, online shopping and bill paying, etc.

Thanks.
Yes...970 refers to the northbridge chipset, as does 990. The 970 and 990 is top-of-line, I think it refers to number of PCIe lanes it offers and, therefore, number of PCIe sockets with full x16 bandwidth. Maybe some other things.

But also, being "top of line" motherboards built on them (especially 990) tend to come with better VRM designs which are important for overclocking FX6300 and FX8300 series CPU's. I don't think any boards were well enough made to support the FX9000 series CPU's that had 220W and over power ratings. But at any rate, you want to avoid the 770 or 780 series chipsets which tend to come with pretty poor VRM's...often even without heatsinking on the FET's.

Successful move depends on the component condition I suppose...if good, it should work OK. Memory may or may not achieve it's full DDR3 XMP rated speed though. When taking heatsink off your CPU be sure to 'break' the thermal interface material loose: twist it back and forth slightly a few times then pull straight up carefully; repeat if it doesn't give. If you pull to hard it might pull the pins out of their sockets. If it does it might bend a few which can be straightened.
 
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Sep 7, 2022
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Yes...970 refers to the northbridge chipset, as does 990. The 990 is top-of-line, I think it refers to number of PCIe lanes it offers and, therefore, number of PCIe sockets with full x16 bandwidth. Maybe some other things.

But also, being "top of line" motherboards built on them (especially 990) tend to come with better VRM designs which are important for overclocking FX6300 and FX8300 series CPU's. I don't think any boards were well enough made to support the FX9000 series CPU's that had 220W and over power ratings. But at any rate, you want to avoid the 770 or 780 series chipsets which tend to come with pretty poor VRM's...often even without heatsinking on the FET's.
Do you think it would work or am I barking up the wrong tree?
 
Do you think it would work or am I barking up the wrong tree?
Depending on their condition yes I do. What specifically are the problems you're experiencing? Why are you confident the motherboard would fix it?

What are the rest of your components? Being built a decade ago it's highly likely it has a less than stellar PSU, and even a good one is getting in the zone where resistors have shifted values and capacitors have lost their....capacitance. A fluctuating or sagging +12V line will cause a lot of problems for memory, CPU and GPU VRM's.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
What does the 970 mean in the nomenclature? My board is by Gigabyte but I see some of these are by MSI. Is this a case of sellers slapping their brand on hardware they only sell? I see that a lot with GPUs.
They do a lot more than slap their names on it. AMD sells their board partners the basic chipsets and other things needed to run their CPU. All the other stuff and the building of the board have to be designed and executed by the board maker. The same goes for GPUs. Consumer motherboards are a small margin business, so AMD shies away from that in the market and Intel mostly abandoned their own consumer motherboards about a decade ago, with the exceptions of things like their small integrated NUCs.
 
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