Question should i be worried about my gpu and cpu temps

oscarwilliams34

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I bought a hp omen 25l gaming pc 2 days ago and i have noticed quite high cpu and gpu temps. My gpu is an rtx 2060 one fan model and when at sustained 97-100 per cent usage seemed to settle on 82-83 degrees. My i5 10400f was also hitting similar temps but was not maxing out consistently so may get hotter. My case is relatively small but has a fair amount of entries for airflow, while only having one case fan at the back. There is a bracket for another case fan built in at the top, which could be removed, exposing the holes in the top of the case for more airflow, but this may let in dust or small bugs. Are these temperatures cause for concern?
 

eibelbilly

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May 6, 2020
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Put case fans near the graphics card as intakes until it around 75-80 degrees at 98 percent usage, a i5 shouldn't really go over 75c
 

Furzumz

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May 28, 2020
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rtx 2060 has a max operating temperature of 88c. 83c is certainly warm but single fan cards are going to run hotter than a full sized card that have 2 or more fans and a bigger heatsink

That processor has its tjunction at 100c. ~80c sounds warm but you said that's a prebuilt HP right? It's probably using the stock cooler or an equivalent.

Personally I'd call those temperatures warm but not hardware destroying levels of warm.

Well, maybe 'hot' instead of warm but still.

There is a bracket for another case fan built in at the top, which could be removed, exposing the holes in the top of the case for more airflow, but this may let in dust or small bugs. Are these temperatures cause for concern?
I say put an extra case fan in there. I'm sure it would help a bit

Case fans are pretty cheap
 

Phaaze88

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Hmm...
A)The Turing gpus have a thermal throttle limit of 83-84C(depending on model) with an emergency shutoff limit of 85-88C(depending on model).
Gpu isn't doing so great, thermally speaking.

B)Cpu isn't thermally sensitive as the gpu is; it'll run at max speed at any operating temp - except for it's critical limit, which is 100C.
Cpu is doing fine so far.

C)Changing the top won't do anything spectacular, except for letting more dust in - keep it as is.
Do not do top intake, as that'll create a hotspot in the chassis and just make things worse.

D)The problem here is the front panel.
Sweet Mother of Betsy, what is with prebuilts these days?
It's gotta be the marketing idiots pressuring the engineers to design flashy crap like that - neglecting actual cooling performance - to draw in customers, then they're sooner or later complaining about thermals.

There's not much you can do here...
 

Phaaze88

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@oscarwilliams34
I have a couple of suggestions, if you're not afraid of working inside the chassis...
1)Remove the front fan only, check cpu and gpu thermals again.

2)Is the tubing on the CLC cooler long enough to allow you to mount it in the front fan slot?
If so, do so with the radiator fan positioned to PULL air though the radiator, instead of pushing.
Leave BOTH top and rear fan slots empty - that's right, no exhaust fans. Test thermals again.
 

Phaaze88

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from what i read the max safe temperature was 88 degrees.
It's not the same across the entire product stack though.
Well, you can check the gpu's Vbios to be sure.
Download and run Gpu-Z: https://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/
Click on the Advanced tab, then the drop-down box, and select Nvidia Bios. The info will be there under Temperature Limit.

I am not really sure how thermal throttling works but the temperatures on max seem to stay at 82 degrees, occasionally peaking at 83 then dropping down.
It's a constant wave of the card running up to 83C, then dropping clocks, voltage, power, and then bounces back up once parameters are acceptable.

Do you think that investing in a top fan would help
No. There's a lack of intake in this scenario, and with the lack of said intake, the gpu 'cools down' on its own exhaust.
Try the 2 steps I suggested in my 2nd post.

would current temperatures affect performance or put parts at risk.
No, that's why the device is designed to throttle; it's a protection feature... but you're not getting the best performance out of the card if it's throttling.
 

Phaaze88

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Edit: i noticed that my gpu fan speed is locked at 70 and when i turned it up to 100 in msi afterburner my gpu temp went down to 75 degrees. Is this a potential solution or something which will open up a different can of worms.
It's a solution - if the new noise profile doesn't bother you. IF that's not satisfactory, and you're not willing to get inside your PC to try a couple of fan setups, then there's nothing else to be done.
 
Reactions: RodroX
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Chances are the RTX has a curve set for that temperature, so even if you add a fan, it wouldn't make it run more than 1-2°C cooler as the card's fan will just spin a little slower.

In any case, not really worrying temps, they are good, but still, I'd add an exhaust fan. But again the temps are fine.
 

Karadjgne

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With that case you have the ability to top mount fans. Do so. Remove the rear exhaust, it's counter productive and block off that port entirely Use 2x high cfm airflow fans on top as exhaust. Only fans you'll need. You create a chimney. If there's any removable slot covers below the gpu, take them out, that area will be needed by the gpu to pull in fresh air. Don't bother with front intakes, semi useless and will raise gpu temps.

The stock cooler is a broadcast area cooler, not a tower with exhaust facing the rear, so most of the heat goes up. That's why you want 2x exhaust on top, channels the heat up and out, not trying to turn it sideways.
 

Karadjgne

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They actually labeled the units according to size, 25liter for the smaller case. It's the same case except for the intake fan area. You don't get much airflow from the front. It's basically HP version of the H500. Not sure (can't find reliable fittings) but should have at least 1x 120mm on top, can't find any source of info for other fans. A top exhaust instead of rear would make more sense with that cooler. The fan is below the cooler level, so the entire top is nothing but a hot-pocket wanting to go up and out but getting sucked back down. Better to have help exhausting out the top chimney style, block off the rear to help with natural convection and not be a source of intake.
 

oscarwilliams34

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Oct 26, 2018
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Hmm...
A)The Turing gpus have a thermal throttle limit of 83-84C(depending on model) with an emergency shutoff limit of 85-88C(depending on model).
Gpu isn't doing so great, thermally speaking.

B)Cpu isn't thermally sensitive as the gpu is; it'll run at max speed at any operating temp - except for it's critical limit, which is 100C.
Cpu is doing fine so far.

C)Changing the top won't do anything spectacular, except for letting more dust in - keep it as is.
Do not do top intake, as that'll create a hotspot in the chassis and just make things worse.

D)The problem here is the front panel.
Sweet Mother of Betsy, what is with prebuilts these days?
It's gotta be the marketing idiots pressuring the engineers to design flashy crap like that - neglecting actual cooling performance - to draw in customers, then they're sooner or later complaining about thermals.

There's not much you can do here...
I'm not sure if air being able to escape is the problem as even when i took the whole side panel off it only dropped to like 78 degrees
 

oscarwilliams34

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Is the front panel not removable? That should also be removed alongside the side panel when you test chassis intake.
78 is still better than 83C - I checked, and 83C is when the card starts thermal throttling, with a shut down temp of just 85C.
Is the front panel not removable? That should also be removed alongside the side panel when you test chassis intake.
78 is still better than 83C - I checked, and 83C is when the card starts thermal throttling, with a shut down temp of just 85C.
from what i read the max safe temperature was 88 degrees. I am not really sure how thermal throttling works but the temperatures on max seem to stay at 82 degrees, occasionally peaking at 83 then dropping down. Do you think that investing in a top fan would help and would current temperatures affect performance or put parts at risk.
 

oscarwilliams34

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Oct 26, 2018
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It's not the same across the entire product stack though.
Well, you can check the gpu's Vbios to be sure.
Download and run Gpu-Z: https://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/
Click on the Advanced tab, then the drop-down box, and select Nvidia Bios. The info will be there under Temperature Limit.


It's a constant wave of the card running up to 83C, then dropping clocks, voltage, power, and then bounces back up once parameters are acceptable.


No. There's a lack of intake in this scenario, and with the lack of said intake, the gpu 'cools down' on its own exhaust.
Try the 2 steps I suggested in my 2nd post.


No, that's why the device is designed to throttle; it's a protection feature... but you're not getting the best performance out of the card if it's throttling.
Is there anything i can do to fix the heat problem then? I am not sure i want to be unsrewing the front of my computer until i know whether there is anything i can do to fix the problem.

Edit: i noticed that my gpu fan speed is locked at 70 and when i turned it up to 100 in msi afterburner my gpu temp went down to 75 degrees. Is this a potential solution or something which will open up a different can of worms.
 
Last edited:

oscarwilliams34

Prominent
Oct 26, 2018
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They actually labeled the units according to size, 25liter for the smaller case. It's the same case except for the intake fan area. You don't get much airflow from the front. It's basically HP version of the H500. Not sure (can't find reliable fittings) but should have at least 1x 120mm on top, can't find any source of info for other fans. A top exhaust instead of rear would make more sense with that cooler. The fan is below the cooler level, so the entire top is nothing but a hot-pocket wanting to go up and out but getting sucked back down. Better to have help exhausting out the top chimney style, block off the rear to help with natural convection and not be a source of intake.
I think the exhaust fan is too small to fit in the top fan slot, should i be adding a top fan as well, or just removing the exhaust and adding a top fan?
 

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