Question Should I set up my H100 as an intake or exhaust?

TiernO

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Dec 30, 2015
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I have a Corsair Hydro H100 cpu cooler on the way which has 2 x 120mm fans. My cause is a Game Max Abyss which currently just has one exhaust fan on the back. The current CPU cooler I am using is just the stock intel one, which is clogged with dust. My case has space for the radiator on the top and front of the case. What should I do?
 

Phaaze88

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This?


This one is rather one sided.
Look at that airflow restriction present at the front. You don't need to add any more in the front, which the radiator would do on top of what's present.

Top exhaust.
 

TiernO

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Dec 30, 2015
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Air intake from the front only comes from the sides, not bottom of the case or even straight on. Too resticted airflow, even on the sides.
And so if I mount it at the top, the cooler will be blowing hot air out of the pc? It's a liquid cooler so I'm just a bit confused how that works.
 

Phaaze88

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Any cpu/gpu cooler is only as effective as what the chassis allows.
The more obstacles present for airflow, and the higher their 'difficulty', the less effective cooling is.
An AIO is not a miracle fix for cooling - they still need air. They also take longer to cool down because of their higher thermal capacity.

If the radiator were to be mounted at the front, of which there are some pretty solid obstacles:
-Airflow loses more strength when it has to turn, as opposed to straight in and out.
-Those little side grilles restrict airflow. I've seen worse side vents designs, like on the Gigabyte C200.
-Fans draw air in a conical shape in front of them, but there's a wall in the way obstructing this and forcing them to draw from the sides. This goes back to point 1.
-The radiator itself also restricts airflow.
^The fans will have to work harder to get any reasonable air though, and fans having to work harder means more noise.

If mounted at the top, the grille and filter are the main obstacles. Other than that, it's a straight path up and out.
You can get away with running the fans at lower speeds here too.
 

TiernO

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Dec 30, 2015
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Any cpu/gpu cooler is only as effective as what the chassis allows.
The more obstacles present for airflow, and the higher their 'difficulty', the less effective cooling is.
An AIO is not a miracle fix for cooling - they still need air. They also take longer to cool down because of their higher thermal capacity.

If the radiator were to be mounted at the front, of which there are some pretty solid obstacles:
-Airflow loses more strength when it has to turn, as opposed to straight in and out.
-Those little side grilles restrict airflow. I've seen worse side vents designs, like on the Gigabyte C200.
-Fans draw air in a conical shape in front of them, but there's a wall in the way obstructing this and forcing them to draw from the sides. This goes back to point 1.
-The radiator itself also restricts airflow.
^The fans will have to work harder to get any reasonable air though, and fans having to work harder means more noise.

If mounted at the top, the grille and filter are the main obstacles. Other than that, it's a straight path up and out.
You can get away with running the fans at lower speeds here too.
So if they are mounted at the top, air is coming from the outside to cool the CPU?
 

Phaaze88

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A PC is a space heater. It does neither you, or it any good to trap heat inside. The more effectively it gets out, the better.
What little air comes in through the front and the grille near the rear PCIe slots will make its way up and out through the top.
A top intake will not work well here.
 

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