Question Should I upgrade? Current PC doesn't support Windows 11... Z97-Pro

alexb75

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Hi,

I have an Asus Z97-Pro with Intel i7-4790 CPU and the following components. I use it mostly for office work, some programming, some gaming, some video encoding (Handbrake), playing music via Roon (using it as Roon server), feeding a 1920x1200 monitor (not 4K).

GTX 1070 - 32GB low latency DDR3 RAM - 2x3TB HDD, 1x SATA SSD, 1xm.2 SSD - Silent PC with low noise fans

The current PC isn't upgradable to Windows 11, due to the following issues. I believe I can somehow enable Secure boot (it's enabled in BIOS, but can't get Windows to enable it - maybe need re-install), BUT the CPU itself is not supported.

While I love to get Windows 11, it's not critical, however, my m.2 drive is slow due to having only PCI-e x2, I don't have USB-C, and while my CPU is still fast enough (OCed to 4.7 GHz), it's behind specially in multi-tasking.

Questions:
  1. Is it time to upgrade?
  2. If I upgrade, what's the best bang for the buck, specially to use ALL my components (including RAM)?
  3. Can I somehow install Win 11 on this PC?

 
i don't believe there are any LGA 1150 boards / 4th or 5th gen Intel that will be compatible with Windows 11.
you will have to upgrade your board, memory, and CPU to accommodate.

and Windows 11 isn't anything to fret over.
i installed and used it for a couple days this past week and was very disappointed with the lack of customization options.
plus zero performance increase in any benchs i've run.
just reverted back to 10 and much better.
until more applications and hardware actually require it i personally wouldn't bother.
 

alexb75

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i don't believe there are any LGA 1150 boards / 4th or 5th gen Intel that will be compatible with Windows 11.
you will have to upgrade your board, memory, and CPU to accommodate.

and Windows 11 isn't anything to fret over.
i installed and used it for a couple days this past week and was very disappointed with the lack of customization options.
plus zero performance increase in any benchs i've run.
just reverted back to 10 and much better.
until more applications and hardware actually require it i personally wouldn't bother.
Thanks, so no newer motherboard supports DDR3, right? That's the only component (outside of MB/CPU), that I also have to purchase, right? Would a good DDR3 RAM (Corsair Dominator Platinum), and my MB/CPU sell for anything decent?
 

NightHawkRMX

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I would not spend a bunch of money if your system already performs well enough for what you need.

You have 2 options:
  1. Stick to Windows 10 until it goes out of support
  2. Disable the tpm/secure boot check and perform a fresh installation of 11. You can download the iso from Microsoft, then download https://rufus.ie/en/. You can select an "extended windows 11 installation" and then create the usb. Then you can use it to install Windows 11. It should Install without error and should work perfectly. I've installed windows 11 onto a 3rd gen system using this method and it runs perfectly.
 
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punkncat

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Windows 10 is going to be supported for several more years. If the system you have is still performing the tasks in an acceptable way there should be no reason to replace it. Even if you do the GPU will likely have to follow over. W11 is still in an early phase and as John said above, nothing to fret over.
Spending a wad to think you are getting something out of 11 over 10 would likely disappoint after you get over the pretty. (hope you don't need to print anything, lol)
 

Zerk2012

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Ambassador
Hi,

I have an Asus Z97-Pro with Intel i7-4790 CPU and the following components. I use it mostly for office work, some programming, some gaming, some video encoding (Handbrake), playing music via Roon (using it as Roon server), feeding a 1920x1200 monitor (not 4K).

GTX 1070 - 32GB low latency DDR3 RAM - 2x3TB HDD, 1x SATA SSD, 1xm.2 SSD - Silent PC with low noise fans

The current PC isn't upgradable to Windows 11, due to the following issues. I believe I can somehow enable Secure boot (it's enabled in BIOS, but can't get Windows to enable it - maybe need re-install), BUT the CPU itself is not supported.

While I love to get Windows 11, it's not critical, however, my m.2 drive is slow due to having only PCI-e x2, I don't have USB-C, and while my CPU is still fast enough (OCed to 4.7 GHz), it's behind specially in multi-tasking.

Questions:
  1. Is it time to upgrade?
  2. If I upgrade, what's the best bang for the buck, specially to use ALL my components (including RAM)?
  3. Can I somehow install Win 11 on this PC?
If it performs like you need it to their absolutely no reason to upgrade just for W11.
 

alexb75

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Oct 12, 2004
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Windows 10 is going to be supported for several more years. If the system you have is still performing the tasks in an acceptable way there should be no reason to replace it. Even if you do the GPU will likely have to follow over. W11 is still in an early phase and as John said above, nothing to fret over.
Spending a wad to think you are getting something out of 11 over 10 would likely disappoint after you get over the pretty. (hope you don't need to print anything, lol)
What do you mean? You think a GTX 1070 may not be supported in Win 11?
 

alexb75

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Exactly.
My current 4790k will not be forced into WIn 11, even if it were somehow possible.
In 2-3 years, it will be replaced due to age.

There is NO need to change hardware, just for Win 11.
I guess I'll stick it out. I do need some new updates like USB-C, Thunderbolt, etc... biggest issue is m.2 SSD isn't upto speed due to being PCI-E x2, but not sure if in real life I'd notice a difference.

What's the best way to get USB-C? A PCI-E USB-C card?
 

USAFRet

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I guess I'll stick it out. I do need some new updates like USB-C, Thunderbolt, etc... biggest issue is m.2 SSD isn't upto speed due to being PCI-E x2, but not sure if in real life I'd notice a difference.

What's the best way to get USB-C? A PCI-E USB-C card?
Why USB-C?
I'd be hesitant to put any money in this, looking for any real performance increase.
 

Karadjgne

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Ambassador
Until Win10 becomes obsolete with TPM requirements on the games You play, there's no rush or need to side-grade. 11 isn't an upgrade by any sense of the word. It brings no performance benefits, hack job menus and some gimmicks. Microsoft itself has set an EOL for support October 14, 2025. Plenty of time for the current bs with pc part pricing to relax.

There's ppl still happily gaming on Win7, servers and NAS using XP Pro etc.
 
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Bob.B

Respectable
Hi,

I have an Asus Z97-Pro with Intel i7-4790 CPU and the following components. I use it mostly for office work, some programming, some gaming, some video encoding (Handbrake), playing music via Roon (using it as Roon server), feeding a 1920x1200 monitor (not 4K).

GTX 1070 - 32GB low latency DDR3 RAM - 2x3TB HDD, 1x SATA SSD, 1xm.2 SSD - Silent PC with low noise fans

The current PC isn't upgradable to Windows 11, due to the following issues. I believe I can somehow enable Secure boot (it's enabled in BIOS, but can't get Windows to enable it - maybe need re-install), BUT the CPU itself is not supported.

While I love to get Windows 11, it's not critical, however, my m.2 drive is slow due to having only PCI-e x2, I don't have USB-C, and while my CPU is still fast enough (OCed to 4.7 GHz), it's behind specially in multi-tasking.

Questions:
  1. Is it time to upgrade?
  2. If I upgrade, what's the best bang for the buck, specially to use ALL my components (including RAM)?
  3. Can I somehow install Win 11 on this PC?
Just a pref.
I would not touch w11 for at least the next 6 months.
Let others go through the growing pains

Working with what you have get the proper bios and drivers.
Let w10 optimize your disk as needed.
Don't let your ssd's get too full.
Don't auto run unneeded stuff.

As for the m.2.
Unless your moving big chunks of data it won't make much perf diff if speed is 1000MB/s or 8000MB/s.
 

logainofhades

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