[SOLVED] Should I Upgrade My 2 Year old GTX 1050 TI Now (2070/2080) or Wait For The New Upcoming (RTX 3080) Nvidia Ampere GPU?

Aug 10, 2019
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Hey Guys, So I had a goal from Summer 2019 to save up for an upgrade (Currently I have a GTX 1050 TI and 8 GB ram) for my pc (RTX 2070/2080, Power supply, 16-32 GB ram). But today I found out that Nvidia is allegedly planning on releasing a new GPU called "RTX 3080" With New AMPERE Architecture. I have saved up 1,568 USD (To This Date that I am typing this question) and I am planning on ordering those components (Whether it'll be RTX 2070/2080 or RTX 3080) from NewEgg since it is SOOO MUCH cheaper than the country where I live. So My main question is: Should I Upgrade My 2-Year-old GTX 1050 TI to an RTX 2070/2080 or wait for an RTX 3080?
EDIT: CPU: i5-8400 2.8Ghz. COOLER: Arctic Freezer 13 CPU Cooler. Motherboard: Gigabyte H370 HD3 LGA1151v2, Intel H370, DDR4, 2xPCI-E, VGA, DVI, HDMI. MEMORY: G.Skill Value 8GB DDR4 2400Mhz CL15 Kit. GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1050 TI 4GB DVI HDMI DP PCI-E. HARD DISK: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB Sata III WD10EZEX. SSD: Kingston A400 SA400S37/120G 120GB SSD SATA III. POWER SUPPLY: Antec 450W Active PFC VP450P PSU. 1080P Monitor.

EDIT: So I have bought an RTX 2060 From NewEgg. Can't wait to play some games with it :D
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Personally, I think that the current gen AMD cards are a bad purchase decision. We've seen verified issues with them through many channels of community feedback now, and we have several members and moderators here who've had multiple serious issues with their Navi based graphics cards. I think Navi is flawed, as do others, and it's hard to argue against it when you see confirmed symptoms of electromigration on these cards, instability at stock voltages that go away (Temporarily at least, until the problem worsens) by increasing voltage. I think, in MY opinion, that avoiding Navi based cards is a good idea right now. Maybe entirely.

A 1660 Super or 2060 would give you anything you might need for 1080p gaming at whatever the desired level for the most part. Certainly with an RTX 2060 you'd get ~5 years of Ultra everything at 1080p, for the most part. And yes, it IS true that there are a number of games that tend to like the Nvidia drivers/cards better than they do AMD. But it's probably true conversely as well to some degree or other.

I believe Nvidia has cards and drivers that are both more stable and better developed.
 
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Djoza

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Hey Guys, So I had a goal from Summer 2019 to save up for an upgrade (Currently I have a GTX 1050 TI and 8 GB ram) for my pc (RTX 2070/2080, Power supply, 16-32 GB ram). But today I found out that Nvidia is allegedly planning on releasing a new GPU called "RTX 3080" With New AMPERE Architecture. I have saved up 1,568 USD (To This Date that I am typing this question) and I am planning on ordering those components (Whether it'll be RTX 2070/2080 or RTX 3080) from NewEgg since it is SOOO MUCH cheaper than the country where I live. So My main question is: Should I Upgrade My 2-Year-old GTX 1050 TI to an RTX 2070/2080 or wait for an RTX 3080?
for the rtx 3080 you need a mobo with PCI-e 4.0 and they dont come cheap.Be aware that you need other beefy components so the system will be stable and without any bootlenecks.My advice is to buy 2080ti,32gb of ram,and a new psu taht you mentioned.If you use 1050ti on your mobo that means its compatible with the 2080ti (at least i think so) so you dont need a new mobo.For the ram buy 3 more sticks of that same ram (2x16gb if you have only 2 DIMM slots) and a new psu.Im saying that,cuz you should never buy new products emmediately after they release,you need to do tons of research on that gpu and see if it satisfies you needs.I dont know the rest of specs like mobo and cpu,but if you could list them that would help me in giving you advice.
also list the psu model
 
for the rtx 3080 you need a mobo with PCI-e 4.0 and they dont come cheap.Be aware that you need other beefy components so the system will be stable and without any bootlenecks.My advice is to buy 2080ti,32gb of ram,and a new psu taht you mentioned.If you use 1050ti on your mobo that means its compatible with the 2080ti (at least i think so) so you dont need a new mobo.For the ram buy 3 more sticks of that same ram (2x16gb if you have only 2 DIMM slots) and a new psu.Im saying that,cuz you should never buy new products emmediately after they release,you need to do tons of research on that gpu and see if it satisfies you needs.I dont know the rest of specs like mobo and cpu,but if you could list them that would help me in giving you advice.
also list the psu model
What's with you constantly giving people false information?
 

Flayed

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Oct 8, 2019
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Hey Guys, So I had a goal from Summer 2019 to save up for an upgrade (Currently I have a GTX 1050 TI and 8 GB ram) for my pc (RTX 2070/2080, Power supply, 16-32 GB ram). But today I found out that Nvidia is allegedly planning on releasing a new GPU called "RTX 3080" With New AMPERE Architecture. I have saved up 1,568 USD (To This Date that I am typing this question) and I am planning on ordering those components (Whether it'll be RTX 2070/2080 or RTX 3080) from NewEgg since it is SOOO MUCH cheaper than the country where I live. So My main question is: Should I Upgrade My 2-Year-old GTX 1050 TI to an RTX 2070/2080 or wait for an RTX 3080?
I'm in the same situation as you although I'm enjoying gaming on my 1050 ti at the moment I've been playing borderlands 3 @ 1080p low detail the graphics look great lol Playing some turn based strategy games on full details also.
 

beers

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I'd see how the release plays out if you're willing to wait a few months, that should give you a better idea of the performance aspect of the new arch.
for the rtx 3080 you need a mobo with PCI-e 4.0 and they dont come cheap.
As per others this is a false requirement as PCIe is backwards compatible.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
for the rtx 3080 you need a mobo with PCI-e 4.0
This statement, would seem to make this

I dont know the rest of specs like mobo and cpu,but if you could list them that would help me in giving you advice.
Unlikely.

In the future it would be helpful for everybody involved if you'd take the time to educate yourself better BEFORE making comments, so that you don't unintentionally spread misinformation. Thanks.
 
Aug 10, 2019
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for the rtx 3080 you need a mobo with PCI-e 4.0 and they dont come cheap.Be aware that you need other beefy components so the system will be stable and without any bootlenecks.My advice is to buy 2080ti,32gb of ram,and a new psu taht you mentioned.If you use 1050ti on your mobo that means its compatible with the 2080ti (at least i think so) so you dont need a new mobo.For the ram buy 3 more sticks of that same ram (2x16gb if you have only 2 DIMM slots) and a new psu.Im saying that,cuz you should never buy new products emmediately after they release,you need to do tons of research on that gpu and see if it satisfies you needs.I dont know the rest of specs like mobo and cpu,but if you could list them that would help me in giving you advice.
also list the psu model
CPU: i5-8400 2.8Ghz. COOLER: Arctic Freezer 13 CPU Cooler. Motherboard: Gigabyte H370 HD3 LGA1151v2, Intel H370, DDR4, 2xPCI-E, VGA, DVI, HDMI. MEMORY: G.Skill Value 8GB DDR4 2400Mhz CL15 Kit. GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1050 TI 4GB DVI HDMI DP PCI-E. HARD DISK: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB Sata III WD10EZEX. SSD: Kingston A400 SA400S37/120G 120GB SSD SATA III. POWER SUPPLY: Antec 450W Active PFC VP450P PSU. 1080P Monitor.
 
Aug 10, 2019
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You do not need a PCI-E 4.0 motherboard for the RTX 3080. That said, if you can tolerate your performance, wait. If not, I would upgrade, even if it is to a better card, that can be used as a stop gap, like a 1660s.
The Thing is That I don't want to waste my money for nothing (Like any person). And To Spend 300 USD (From NewEgg) to buy a GPU that I won't need in half a year is a waste. if ill get a GPU Like The 1660 Super than it'll have to be for at least 2 years. So again if I really am going to get the 1660 Super I won't be changing it any time soon.
 
Aug 10, 2019
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What are your full PC specs?
CPU: i5-8400 2.8Ghz. COOLER: Arctic Freezer 13 CPU Cooler. Motherboard: Gigabyte H370 HD3 LGA1151v2, Intel H370, DDR4, 2xPCI-E, VGA, DVI, HDMI. MEMORY: G.Skill Value 8GB DDR4 2400Mhz CL15 Kit. GPU: Gigabyte GTX 1050 TI 4GB DVI HDMI DP PCI-E. HARD DISK: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB Sata III WD10EZEX. SSD: Kingston A400 SA400S37/120G 120GB SSD SATA III. POWER SUPPLY: Antec 450W Active PFC VP450P PSU. 1080P Monitor.
 

King_V

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With 1080p @ 60Hz, there is no reason whatsoever to even consider a 2070, much less a 2080 or 3080. Your screen cannot display more than 60fps at 1920x1080.

The highest card I'd recommend is maybe a GTX 1660 or GTX 1660 Super. Or the RX 5600XT. Anything more than that is performance you can't use, because your screen can't display any more than 60fps.
 
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Aug 10, 2019
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With 1080p @ 60Hz, there is no reason whatsoever to even consider a 2070, much less a 2080 or 3080. Your screen cannot display more than 60fps at 1920x1080.

The highest card I'd recommend is maybe a GTX 1660 or GTX 1660 Super. Or the RX 5600XT. Anything more than that is performance you can't use, because your screen can't display any more than 60fps.
actually, after reading the replays I am considering a 1660 super. the price to performance is AMAZING!
 

King_V

Distinguished
actually, after reading the replays I am considering a 1660 super. the price to performance is AMAZING!
Yeah, they typically go for only a tiny bit more than the plain non-Super 1660.

SOMETIMES, however, you'll find a non-Super 1660 discounted pretty decently, so if you find one, go for that.

Also, if you can find an RX 5600 XT for around 1660 Super money, go for it. The 5600XT will have fewer points where it ever dips below 60fps than would a 1660 Super.
 
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Aug 10, 2019
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Yeah, they typically go for only a tiny bit more than the plain non-Super 1660.

SOMETIMES, however, you'll find a non-Super 1660 discounted pretty decently, so if you find one, go for that.

Also, if you can find an RX 5600 XT for around 1660 Super money, go for it. The 5600XT will have fewer points where it ever dips below 60fps than would a 1660 Super.
I've heard that AMD GPUs tend to perform poorly. is that true?
I've found the RX 5600 XT for 80-100 USD more expensive but I want to know the difference. also, will the RX 5600 XT work well with games? again I have heard that some games like GTA V tend to perform poorly than an NVIDIA CARD.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Personally, I think that the current gen AMD cards are a bad purchase decision. We've seen verified issues with them through many channels of community feedback now, and we have several members and moderators here who've had multiple serious issues with their Navi based graphics cards. I think Navi is flawed, as do others, and it's hard to argue against it when you see confirmed symptoms of electromigration on these cards, instability at stock voltages that go away (Temporarily at least, until the problem worsens) by increasing voltage. I think, in MY opinion, that avoiding Navi based cards is a good idea right now. Maybe entirely.

A 1660 Super or 2060 would give you anything you might need for 1080p gaming at whatever the desired level for the most part. Certainly with an RTX 2060 you'd get ~5 years of Ultra everything at 1080p, for the most part. And yes, it IS true that there are a number of games that tend to like the Nvidia drivers/cards better than they do AMD. But it's probably true conversely as well to some degree or other.

I believe Nvidia has cards and drivers that are both more stable and better developed.
 
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King_V

Distinguished
This is one of the few points Darkbreeze and I disagree on, as I've had no problems, and much more success with AMD/ATI overall. Naturally, I've had less TOTAL experience with Nvidia, but it's been more problematic for me (and I personally find the drivers maddening, although I haven't ever had any stability issues with them - but I haven't with AMD either).

That said, if the RX 5600 XT is 80-100 dollars more than the 1660 Super, then go with the 1660 Super. My recommendation for the RX 5600 XT is based on if it's priced less than, equal to, or only slightly more, than the 1660 Super.

I think generally DX11 games tend to favor Nvidia cards, and DX12 games tend to favor AMD cards, but there are likely exceptions to that.
 

Darkbreeze

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Moderator
Since our last conversation on this subject, I've seen three more cards either fail or develop serious coil whine issues. All were 5700 XT Navi based cards. All were Sapphire cards. Those are just the ones from the people I know, not the ones I've seen on the forum in random threads. I and more than one person on the moderation team agrees that it's too much to be coincidence.

They didn't have ANY problems for a period of time either. But when problems, the same exact kind, develop on a second card, it's kind of hard to not believe that the thermal limits set by AMD for these cards are the problem. It's not the manufacturers and it's not anything else in the system. It is ONLY the too-high thermal limit that AMD says is fine but that neither Nvidia nor any prior AMD architecture would ever have been allowed to run at. It is electromigration, same as for a too-high overclocked CPU. It is verifiable in several of these cases. I don't see there can be any argument about it really. Plus, I've seen at least four or five others, same exact conditions. Same exact results. Problem repeated over time after replacement of the card.

Yes, the cards work, but you shouldn't have to LOWER the thermal limit and reduce performance just to make the card last longer than six months to a year. Keep in mind this was the last of Koduri's architecture designs before he left for Intel and EVERY generation he's had a hand in since 2013 has had some kind of thermal issue. This is the first time, other than the R9 295x2 that I know of that specifically had problems with electromigration and that has to be related to the high thermal limit set by AMD. All Koduri's cards have run high and hot though. All of them. All of the higher end and flagship models anyhow.
 

King_V

Distinguished
That's even weirder for me as well, since Sapphire is supposed to have a good reputation. The last batch of three was also Sapphire, if I recall correctly, yes?

I've never done anything with having to tweak voltages, thermal limits, etc. If I would've HAD to do that, it would definitely have soured me.

Is it always with the highest end cards (5700 XT, for this generation)? My son's is a 5700, which has a lower power draw. Likewise, he had the RX 580 (as opposed to say, the RX 590) trouble free, and my R9 285 (which was less in terms of power draw than either the R9 280 or 280X) etc.,

Maybe your assumption is right about it being specifically high-end/flagship models are more prone to issues. This would definitely NOT be the 5600 XT's realm.

(side note: I've never had a high-end or flagship card, unless you're counting the Riva 128 4MB when they first came out. Even with the GTX 1080, the 1080Ti had been out for a while).
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, these from the last few batches were all Sapphire cards. There have been a couple of MSI and XFX cards as well though. Pretty sure it's been all 5700 XT's.

My experience is that when one apple is bad, you'd better be really skeptical about the rest of the apples in the barrel, or just go straight to a different barrel that has no rot in sight.
 

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