Question Should i upgrade my 550 watts PSU powering a 6800xt ?

JM_1__

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5600x
32gb ram 4x8
2 ssds
1 hdd
1nvme
1 6800xt

550 watts psu..

should i upgrade? its working fine it hasn't blown up so far..

I will not be overclocking.

Is the additional PSU wattage all marketing or is there fact to it?
 

Bassman999

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Feb 27, 2021
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It is marketing to a point.

And also partly because they dont know if you have a quality PSU or a Chinese bargain brand that wont/cant do rated power.

Do you have a Killa-Watt or similar electricity monitor?
I run tests with that and I can see what my actual draw is.
In my dell system for example i5-7600 and GTX-1650 draw only 175 gaming peak.
weak system example, but I havent built my new pc yet (tomorrow).
6800xt said to draw 300
5600x said to draw 142 maximum even though rated at 65
thats roughly 450 add power for ram and SSDs etc... and is close.
Then you have to consider the quality of your PSU and its 12v power output specifically since most will be placed on that rail(s)

Ifs close, and a judgement call, but that power meter will tell you actual draw to know for sure.

https://www.amazon.com/P3-P4400-Electricity-Usage-Monitor/dp/B00009MDBU/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=electricity+usage+monitor&qid=1614661514&sr=8-4
 

Bassman999

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my estimates are inline with yours.. i used teh new egg calculator.. i dont plan to overclock
Im planning to run 5800x and Sapphire RX 6800 Nitro+ on a SFX Corsair 600 watt PSU.
I might trade up to a 5900x if I find one at retail. At that point Ill have to sell the 5800x though and maybe take a loss on it.
 

JM_1__

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well i was able to get another psu.. a 750 watts one season s11

im testing it on the system right now .. working just fine.. nothing has blown up yet.
 
Must be old stock. M12ii has been out of production for a year or 2 at least, if memory serves.

$40 is probably about what I'd pay for it, but you really should spend more and get a better unit.

Double forward+Group regulated and a 6800xt is just not a good idea.
 
Must be old stock. M12ii has been out of production for a year or 2 at least, if memory serves.

$40 is probably about what I'd pay for it, but you really should spend more and get a better unit.

Double forward+Group regulated and a 6800xt is just not a good idea.
Actually, the M12II 750W is double forward with DC-DC. Not saying it's a good option, but at least it's not group regulated. Definitely better than the silverstone unit, but for a 6800 XT it's still no bueno.
 
can you educate me what is double forward, and what is group regulated. and what psu would you suggest i get.
It is the kind of electric circuit that is used on the PSU. On the primary side (where the voltage is high) you have double forward, ACRF, LLC, and PSR. Double forward is worse, it is implemented on most lower end PSUs nowadays. ACRF is usually used somewhere in the lower-mid range or mid-range PSUs, it is better than DF but still not suitable for high end builds. On the other hand LLC and PSR are used on higher end PSUs, it is the most modern and the most efficient way to convert AC current into DC. If you use a double forward (or sometimes ACRF) PSU on a high power consumption GPU like the 6800 XT, the transformer on the PSU will scream because it's not designed to cope with such loads. That's why if you pair a cheap PSU with something like the 6800 XT coil whine is expected to be hearable.

On the secondary side (where the voltage is lower) , you have group regulation, individual regulation, and DC-DC. Group regulation is mostly used cheap PSUs, and is bad for your components. It means that the 12V rail and the 5V rail is regulated together, which means that when you give unbalanced loads (meaning high 12V and low 5V, or low 12V and high 5V), the voltage level will be all over the place. This will cause component degradation and it is something that you don't want. Individual and DC-DC regulation, each rail are individually regulated, which means that you won't have problems with unbalanced loads. Most PCs today will see unbalanced loads, because that is how Intel Haswell C6/C7 idle power states work.

If you are interested on this you can check Tom'shardware PSU 101 here:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supplies-101,4193.html

Now for the recommendation, it depends on where you live and the pricing situation there. It is always best to say where you live and an online local store for reference.
 
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JM_1__

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Jan 26, 2017
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It is the kind of electric circuit that is used on the PSU. On the primary side (where the AC current flows) you have double forward, ACRF, LLC, and PSR. Double forward is worse, it is implemented on most lower end PSUs nowadays. ACRF is usually used somewhere in the lower-mid range or mid-range PSUs, it is better than DF but still not suitable for high end builds. On the other hand LLC and PSR are used on higher end PSUs, it is the most modern and the most efficient way to convert AC current into DC. If you use a double forward (or sometimes ACRF) PSU on a high power consumption GPU like the 6800 XT, the transformer on the PSU will scream because it's not designed to cope with such loads. That's why if you pair a cheap PSU with something like the 6800 XT coil whine is expected to be hearable.

On the secondary side (where the DC current flows) , you have group regulation, individual regulation, and DC-DC. Group regulation is mostly used cheap PSUs, and is bad for your components. It means that the 12V rail and the 5V rail is regulated together, which means that when you give unbalanced loads (meaning high 12V and low 5V, or low 12V and high 5V), the voltage level will be all over the place. This will cause component degradation and it is something that you don't want. Individual and DC-DC regulation, each rail are individually regulated, which means that you won't have problems with unbalanced loads. Most PCs today will see unbalanced loads, because that is how Intel Haswell C6/C7 idle power states work.

If you are interested on this you can check Tom'shardware PSU 101 here:
https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/power-supplies-101,4193.html

Now for the recommendation, it depends on where you live and the pricing situation there. It is always best to say where you live and an online local store for reference.
interesting. so i shouldn't use this psu for mining then.
 

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