[SOLVED] Should i upgrade my pc to a better one?

Sep 23, 2019
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So, i have a pretty decent pc and im looking to upgrade so what should i buy theb?

Just in case, here are my specs.

Geforce GTX 680
4GB Ram
Intel i5-2500k 3.30 GHz
Some random case that doesn't have great airflow


If i decide to buy a build a new pc, then what are your recommendations? Under 1k.
 

512-Bit

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Apr 17, 2019
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https://pcpartpicker.com/user/someone7833/saved/zKxK4D

You get the R5 2600 which is dirt cheap rn, and it can overclock to 4 GHz and higher, I got my personal R5 2600 to 4.15 GHz (some can get to 4.2, and my friend even got theirs to 5)

The cooler master AIO is on sale now, so it's $66 instead of $80, which is sort of a steal
The 16GB ram kit is cheap also, and it runs at 3000 Mhz.
The 1660 Ti is a beast for the money
The H500i comes with some RGB lighting

If you want an intel based system, https://pcpartpicker.com/user/someone7833/saved/R6MYHx

Some of the intel parts can be replaced with better ones (For example, the motherboard,) but it's still a decent system
 

512-Bit

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Apr 17, 2019
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Not necessarily.

What games are you playing, and what are your FPS goals? Are you achieving them? If so, you may be able to just get a better airflow case. You definitely need more RAM. The 2500k is ok, considering it is a quad core without hyperthreading, and is overclockable.

The graphics card, depending on your games, may need an upgrade.
Is it possible you can find out what your case is?
 
Reactions: CloudyFaygo
Sep 23, 2019
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I think my case is a older model of a full tower, and i can't find any manufacturer mark on it.
My pc can't connect to fiber/ 5gGHz internet so i think i need to get a new one.
Although my pc is a bit laggy i still get 144 fps in most games with a 60hz monitor so i'd say it's reaching good FPS goals.

So im looking for a good pc that i can build for under 1k USD, what are you're recommendations?
 

512-Bit

Proper
Apr 17, 2019
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https://pcpartpicker.com/user/someone7833/saved/zKxK4D

You get the R5 2600 which is dirt cheap rn, and it can overclock to 4 GHz and higher, I got my personal R5 2600 to 4.15 GHz (some can get to 4.2, and my friend even got theirs to 5)

The cooler master AIO is on sale now, so it's $66 instead of $80, which is sort of a steal
The 16GB ram kit is cheap also, and it runs at 3000 Mhz.
The 1660 Ti is a beast for the money
The H500i comes with some RGB lighting

If you want an intel based system, https://pcpartpicker.com/user/someone7833/saved/R6MYHx

Some of the intel parts can be replaced with better ones (For example, the motherboard,) but it's still a decent system
 

j3ster

Reputable
May 23, 2016
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PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($129.20 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Deepcool GAMMAXX GT 29.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB GAMING X Video Card ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ NZXT)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $952.11


for under 1kUSD this would be your best bet, you can also do an Ryzen 2700 but it would bring the price up close to 1kUSD.

you can save more if you already own an SSD and a HDD for storage.
 

512-Bit

Proper
Apr 17, 2019
236
24
115
6
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($129.20 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Deepcool GAMMAXX GT 29.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB GAMING X Video Card ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ NZXT)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $952.11


for under 1kUSD this would be your best bet, you can also do an Ryzen 2700 but it would bring the price up close to 1kUSD.

you can save more if you already own an SSD and a HDD for storage.
What if this guy wants to go Intel?
 
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($129.20 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Deepcool GAMMAXX GT 29.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Motherboard: Gigabyte B450 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard ($107.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB GAMING X Video Card ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ NZXT)
Power Supply: Corsair RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $952.11


for under 1kUSD this would be your best bet, you can also do an Ryzen 2700 but it would bring the price up close to 1kUSD.

you can save more if you already own an SSD and a HDD for storage.
I'd go with the 2600X and forgo the Deepcool CPU cooler. $20 more for the slightly faster CPU, but the 2600X also comes with the Wraith Spire cooler, which is beefier than the 2600 non-X's Wraith Stealth.


What if this guy wants to go Intel?
Why?

Most likely, though, more heat, and a need for an aftermarket cooler.
 

j3ster

Reputable
May 23, 2016
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I'd go with the 2600X and forgo the Deepcool CPU cooler. $20 more for the slightly faster CPU, but the 2600X also comes with the Wraith Spire cooler, which is beefier than the 2600 non-X's Wraith Stealth.

it depends if the OP doesnt want to overclock the 2600x is better, but its cooler is still not great and an aftermarket cooler would still be ideal.

What if this guy wants to go Intel?

for intel, its bad only real choice is 9400f/8400 both with no hyperthreading, not much difference in performance over the 2600/2600x and needs a more expensive motherboard also its locked so if soon you want to just get a free bump in performance (tons of 2600 OC guides out there) you cant do that. worst is if ever at some point OP wants to upgrade he needs to change his motherboard as well for AMD he can just do a simple BIOS flash and viola 3600 and MAYBE even a 3700x not so sure about VRMs of the gigabyte board i posted.
 
@512-Bit, your PCPartPicker links there are private. Try using the "Markup: BB" link near the top of the page and copying and pasting the highlighted text into your post.

For a $1000 budget, I would probably look into getting a Ryzen 3600 to start. Once you've added an aftermarket cooler to a 2600, you are getting within reach of the price of 3600 anyway, and a stock 3600 should offer up to 15% more CPU performance on its bundled cooler than an overclocked 2600 or a 2600X, even if an aftermarket cooler would be a bit quieter. Some B450 boards from MSI have a feature where the BIOS can be flashed to support the new CPUs without requiring an older CPU, and their "MAX" boards should support the new CPUs out of the box.

My pc can't connect to fiber/ 5gGHz internet so i think i need to get a new one.
I'm pretty sure nearly all desktop systems from the last decade should support gigabit ethernet, if you are connecting to your network with a wired connection. Or are you referring to wireless connectivity or something? Most desktop motherboards don't include that, though some do. Some more details about what you are referring to might help.
 
In any case, I came back and tried my hand at a $1000 build here...

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI B450M PRO-VDH MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($83.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Intel 660p Series 1.02 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC Video Card ($399.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic FOCUS Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply ($81.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1000.71
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-23 17:43 EDT-0400


I went with the Ryzen 3600 for this build, along with a B450 motherboard that should support 3000-series processors without requiring a BIOS update. I did stay with the stock Ryzen Stealth cooler, but that should be fine for this processor unless you want something that stays a little quieter under load.

I also went with faster 3600 CAS 16 RAM, though cutting back to 3200 CAS 16 wouldn't affect performance too much if you wanted to save an extra $11-$12.

The SSD is the same in j3ster's build, and should offer good performance for its price, being the lowest priced NVMe model available from a decent brand.

The PSU is a good model from Seasonic that should offer plenty of capacity for these components, which are not likely to ever draw more than 350 watts under load.

And the case is just a decent, nice-looking inexpensive model from Phanteks that fits within the budget. I'm not sure whether or not it has better airflow than "some random case that doesn't have great airflow", but it looks nice with tempered glass, and has decent build quality. It could of course be switched to any other case.

I did manage to get a 2060 SUPER 8GB in there, which should push up to 15% higher frame rates than a standard 2060 6GB, or around 40% higher frame rates than a 1660 Ti in games where performance is limited more by graphics performance, rather than the CPU. It would be nearly 3 times as fast as a GTX 680 in such scenarios. You could of course cut back to a regular 2060 for around $330 if you wanted to save $70 though. Or a 1660 Ti for around $270.

However, I notice that you mention getting "144 fps in most games with a 60hz monitor". If that's the case, I'm not even sure you need a new system for the games you play. After all, that 60Hz monitor will only be updating the image 60 times per second, making such high frame rates kind of pointless. Is it even a 1080p screen? Are these mostly e-sports or somewhat older titles? It would actually probably be worth getting a 144Hz high refresh rate and/or higher resolution monitor, and spending less on other components.

It might even be worth just upgrading your existing system for the time being. What are the system's full hardware specs? Does it have an SSD? In what way is your PC "a bit laggy"? I also now notice that you mention it only having 4GB of RAM, which is probably the main cause of that "lagginess". Modern Windows versions will typically utilize a couple gigabytes of RAM just for the OS, so the system will be swapping data out to the hard disk when trying to run just about any semi-modern games. For most recent AAA games, you'll want the system to have 8GB at the very least. It's likely that the system would be a lot more responsive just by swapping out your existing RAM for an inexpensive 2x4GB kit of DDR3 for around $30 on the used market, or around $50 or for a 2x8GB kit. Then just get a SATA SSD for around $100 or less to install Windows, your applications and your most-played games on, and a 144Hz 1080p monitor (which are around $200-$250), and you could likely breath some new life into that system for under $400. The SSD and monitor could of course be carried over to an eventual new system, too.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.79 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: Asus TUF B450M-PLUS GAMING Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($95.87 @ OutletPC)
Memory: G.Skill Flare X 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
Video Card: MSI Radeon RX 580 8 GB ARMOR OC Video Card ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Phanteks Eclipse P400S ATX Mid Tower Case ($82.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair RM (2019) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $841.50
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-23 22:04 EDT-0400


Bump up the gpu if you wish, there's room in the budget, but for a 1080p/60Hz monitor(s) there's really no need. The 1660ti would be my second choice, even for a 144Hz monitor it's fine.
 
Sep 15, 2019
85
8
65
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CPU: AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor ($129.20 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: MSI B450 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard ($114.95 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($77.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 6 GB VENTUS XS OC Video Card ($279.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT H500 ATX Mid Tower Case ($89.98 @ NZXT)
Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply ($125.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $942.97
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-24 05:37 EDT-0400
 

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