[SOLVED] Should I upgrade my PSU or get a Not Break?

Sep 24, 2020
40
2
35
0
Since it looks like I would get a gpu (The 1660 Super With a 4790=Less than 500w) until 2022 (thanks bitcoin) I was thinking, should upgrade my psu or get a not break? Since I read in this website a lot of threats said that the ThermalTake Lite 550w Series is just "no so good". First of all, I live in Mexico, so sometimes can ocurrer a power shortage quite often, and the voltage is irregular most of the time (I use a voltage surge protector but always is good to take precautions). So, I would like to consider a PSU who has protection against all those external factors , protection against power shortage and irregular voltage to keep my pc safe. But... here comes the other thing, a Not Break can offer time to turn off the pc in a safe way during those power shortage. Basically is a dillema
(Side note: Seasonic is super rare to find here in Mexico so I am stuck with Corsair, CoolerMaster, Thermaltake, and Be Quiet)
(Other note: I always wondering about this myth, Is true that SSD die more easly in power shortage than a regular HDD?, because the SSD is the reason of this thread)
Sorry for my bad english
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Well is true, for the UPS, wich one will be recommendable?
By the way, with the Corsair CX650 could handle future upgrades?
(As side note: Why the ThermalTakes psu are so bad in general?)
The CX 650 will handle future upgrades unless you're looking to buy something extremely high-powered like a 3080 or 3090. In that case, I would recommend both more wattage and higher quality. The CX PSUs are very good budget PSUs, but they're budget PSUs and something like an RMx would be more appropriate if you ever plan on spending $800 on a GPU.

Thermaltake's PSU line has a lot of bad ones on the low-end of the product stack because they go very cheap on the manufacturers and designs. Things like the Litepower and non-Gold TR2s are cheaply made by third-tier manufacturers like HEC and Solytech and they're usually made with ancient designs, resulting in poor voltage regulation and the like in modern systems. They also tend to use very cheap capacitors, rated at 85 degrees instead of 105 degrees, and with relatively short lifetimes.

Thermaltake's good PSUs are generally the Toughpower ones. Those are mostly based on quality CWT or Enhance platforms and Thermaltake pays to not have corners cut on those.

Thermaltake's a very hit-and-miss company generally. For example, with cases, they have the very imaginative Core P3 chassis. But they also have a bunch of cases that are just glass-and-steel boxes with little thought being given as to how air would actually get inside.
 
Last edited:

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
Anything with Thermaltake on the side of the PSU is a no-no. What sort of brands do you have access to and what sort of units do you have access to? Perhaps shoot us a link to your preferred site of purchase and include your budget as well. If you incur blackouts, you will still need to invest in an UPS.

In reality everything can die when you have a power failure or a surge of power. More so for SSD's since they're built using (volatile)flash memory.

Might want to also state the specs to your entire build as well.
 
Sep 24, 2020
40
2
35
0
Anything with Thermaltake on the side of the PSU is a no-no. What sort of brands do you have access to and what sort of units do you have access to? Perhaps shoot us a link to your preferred site of purchase and include your budget as well. If you incur blackouts, you will still need to invest in an UPS.

In reality everything can die when you have a power failure or a surge of power. More so for SSD's since they're built using (volatile)flash memory.

Might want to also state the specs to your entire build as well.
The sites where I usually I buy:
https://www.cyberpuerta.mxcyberpuerta.mx
https://ddtech.mx

My specs are a Intel 4790 with Be Quiet Pure Rock SLim, b85m d3h A, one HDD. (I want to have a 1660 super)

So... Should I get the not break or upgrade my psu?
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
In that case, a good psu would have good protection against power shourtage?
And, wich one?
I can't speak to a "not break" as I'm not sure if you're intending to describe a better quality surge protector for the plug, a voltage regulator, or a UPS.

A quality PSU will do a far better job protecting your equipment. It's necessary because your current PSU is a very low quality one. Whether it's enough you'll have to test on your end; you may need both a quality PSU and a voltage regulator. The PSU upgrade is necessary, but it may not be sufficient.

This is the least expensive PSU at Cyberpuerta worth buying for a build with a 1660 Super and an i7.

https://www.cyberpuerta.mx/Computo-Hardware/Componentes/Fuentes-de-Poder-para-PC-s/Fuente-de-Poder-Corsair-CX650-80-PLUS-Bronze-ATX-120mm-650W-Negro.html

While the 550W Corsair CX would be fine, they're identically priced at the moment, so you might as well get the 650.
 
Sep 24, 2020
40
2
35
0
I can't speak to a "not break" as I'm not sure if you're intending to describe a better quality surge protector for the plug, a voltage regulator, or a UPS.

A quality PSU will do a far better job protecting your equipment. It's necessary because your current PSU is a very low quality one. Whether it's enough you'll have to test on your end; you may need both a quality PSU and a voltage regulator. The PSU upgrade is necessary, but it may not be sufficient.

This is the least expensive PSU at Cyberpuerta worth buying for a build with a 1660 Super and an i7.

https://www.cyberpuerta.mx/Computo-Hardware/Componentes/Fuentes-de-Poder-para-PC-s/Fuente-de-Poder-Corsair-CX650-80-PLUS-Bronze-ATX-120mm-650W-Negro.html

While the 550W Corsair CX would be fine, they're identically priced at the moment, so you might as well get the 650.
Yes, I think I would get this one sooner.
As the "not break", I am talking about a UPS because those have a battery when the lights go off I can turn off my pc safely
 
Sep 24, 2020
40
2
35
0
If you need a UPS, then you need both a PSU and a UPS. The UPS won't save your PC from poor quality electricity and the PSU is not a battery backup.
Well is true, for the UPS, wich one will be recommendable?
By the way, with the Corsair CX650 could handle future upgrades?
(As side note: Why the ThermalTakes psu are so bad in general?)
 
Well is true, for the UPS, wich one will be recommendable?
By the way, with the Corsair CX650 could handle future upgrades?
(As side note: Why the ThermalTakes psu are so bad in general?)
Thermaltake PSUs are not bad in general per se, but they have varying degrees of PSUs that are either really bad, decent, and good. The one you have belongs to bad, as it is a really old design from 2005 that is not supposed to be used together with mid range components like you are planning to have. It doesn't mean that every thermaltake PSU is bad, take a look at the Toughpower PF1, Aris (PSU reviewer in tom'shardware) gave it 4 stars which is a lot.

The CX 650 can handle future upgrades. It is a great unit.
 

DSzymborski

Polypheme
Moderator
Well is true, for the UPS, wich one will be recommendable?
By the way, with the Corsair CX650 could handle future upgrades?
(As side note: Why the ThermalTakes psu are so bad in general?)
The CX 650 will handle future upgrades unless you're looking to buy something extremely high-powered like a 3080 or 3090. In that case, I would recommend both more wattage and higher quality. The CX PSUs are very good budget PSUs, but they're budget PSUs and something like an RMx would be more appropriate if you ever plan on spending $800 on a GPU.

Thermaltake's PSU line has a lot of bad ones on the low-end of the product stack because they go very cheap on the manufacturers and designs. Things like the Litepower and non-Gold TR2s are cheaply made by third-tier manufacturers like HEC and Solytech and they're usually made with ancient designs, resulting in poor voltage regulation and the like in modern systems. They also tend to use very cheap capacitors, rated at 85 degrees instead of 105 degrees, and with relatively short lifetimes.

Thermaltake's good PSUs are generally the Toughpower ones. Those are mostly based on quality CWT or Enhance platforms and Thermaltake pays to not have corners cut on those.

Thermaltake's a very hit-and-miss company generally. For example, with cases, they have the very imaginative Core P3 chassis. But they also have a bunch of cases that are just glass-and-steel boxes with little thought being given as to how air would actually get inside.
 
Last edited:
Sep 24, 2020
40
2
35
0
The CX 650 will handle future upgrades unless you're looking to buy something extremely high-powered like a 3080 or 3090. In that case, I would recommend both more wattage and higher quality. The CX PSUs are very good budget PSUs, but they're budget PSUs and something like an RMx would be more appropriate if you ever plan on spending $800 on a GPU.

Thermaltake's PSU line has a lot of bad ones on the low-end of the product stack because they go very cheap on the manufacturers and designs. Things like the Litepower and non-Gold TR2s are cheaply made by third-tier manufacturers like HEC and Solytech and they're usually made with ancient designs, resulting in poor voltage regulation and the like in modern systems. They also tend to use very cheap capacitors, rated at 85 degrees instead of 105 degrees, and with relatively short lifetimes.

Thermaltake's good PSUs are generally the Toughpower ones. Those are mostly based on quality CWT or Enhance platforms and Thermaltake pays to not have corners cut on those.
a RTX 3060ti with a 3600x Ryzen would be that upgrade in 2 years so... I think the CX650 will be enough when the time comes out
And wow, that explains those threads about the thermaltake psu, I never thought there were low quality. I should get first the CS650 and then try to see for a UPS
 

--SID--

Upstanding
Jan 23, 2021
277
65
290
5
Future upgrade is a whole new system because of the i7-4790. You don't put a 3070/3080/3090 next to a 4th gen i7. Get a relatively cheap CX550 now.
 

--SID--

Upstanding
Jan 23, 2021
277
65
290
5
When you let Google translate that page it says that the product is currently out of stock and that you can get a notification when it's available.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY