Shuttle SK41G and IRQ sharing

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Hi!

I bought a m-audio audiophile 24/96 soundcard for my PC and the manual
states that I should have one free IRQ to use with the card.

The problem is, the BIOS IRQ sharing puts every device to IRQ 10.

This is normal, I know, but how can I force a device to use a spesific
IRQ - for example IRQ 5 ?

Normally, I wouldn't care about the IRQ issue,
but the sharing affects to the PCI access speed, so my cards
performance in recording is less than optimal.

I would really appreciate your help.

Regards;
Mikko
Finland
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

On 6 Oct 2004 03:26:24 -0700, dxrd.dxrd@pp.inet.fi (dxrd) wrote:

>Hi!
>
>I bought a m-audio audiophile 24/96 soundcard for my PC and the manual
>states that I should have one free IRQ to use with the card.
>
>The problem is, the BIOS IRQ sharing puts every device to IRQ 10.
>
>This is normal, I know, but how can I force a device to use a spesific
>IRQ - for example IRQ 5 ?
>
>Normally, I wouldn't care about the IRQ issue,
>but the sharing affects to the PCI access speed, so my cards
>performance in recording is less than optimal.

How do you know the IRQ sharing is affecting access speed? AFAIK, when the
mfr specifies that a "free IRQ" needs to be dedicated for their device,
that's for a non-APIC operating environment... e.g. Win98, where the old
i8259 IRQs are used... and of course their mappings through to PCI.

If you're using WinXP, it is an "APIC enabled" operating system and
interrupts are handled quite differently.

Rgds, George Macdonald

"Just because they're paranoid doesn't mean you're not psychotic" - Who, me??
 
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Archived from groups: comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.chips (More info?)

George Macdonald <fammacd=!SPAM^nothanks@tellurian.com> wrote in message news:<35u8m0d5lumc9kcsoj0ic5bqop8vj4089h@4ax.com>...
>
> How do you know the IRQ sharing is affecting access speed? AFAIK, when the
> mfr specifies that a "free IRQ" needs to be dedicated for their device,
> that's for a non-APIC operating environment... e.g. Win98, where the old
> i8259 IRQs are used... and of course their mappings through to PCI.

Really ? I think that wether the device is in APIC control or not,
it's beneficial to assign an IRQ to the device. I think this in
a "traditional" PC way.

Anyway, the card shares IRQs with my USB port, and I've got USB-
keyboard and trackball, and that seems to confuse system quite a
lot.

>
> If you're using WinXP, it is an "APIC enabled" operating system and
> interrupts are handled quite differently.

Yes, it seems to be, more or less :). I'm using Linux as my primary
OS and it would be nice to hear from some Linux guru, how Linux
handles devices, and can I control the APIC behaviour somehow
manually,which devices go to which IRQ and so on.

My previous Hoontech soundcard worked much better with the same
hardware when I first installed it, and it somehow got it's own
IRQ.

Both cards have the same codec (ICE1712) that's why the logic.


-Mikko