SilentiumPC Slides Into High-End Air Cooling With Fortis 3 HE1425

Status
Not open for further replies.

tiagoluz8

Reputable
Jul 21, 2015
56
0
4,630
0
That fan is too big for this cooler, the air takes the path of least resistance, so in this cooler it will flow more to the rest of the case (VRM & RAM) than trough the actual cooler.
 

Au_equus

Distinguished
Mar 31, 2011
812
0
19,060
45
Although the effects of this decision on the unit's cooling performance is questionable, it will prevent customers from utilizing gallium-based TIMs such as Coollaboratory's Liquid Pro, and similar corrosive TIMs.
Mike, Ga will not dissolve Cu. It dissolves/corrodes Al. Please correct the above statement. Plenty of companies use bare copper bases or may have a passive CuO/Cu2O layer, preventing further oxidation, on the base of their respective heatsinks.

http://www.coollaboratory.com/pdf/manual_liquid_ultra_englisch.pdf
 


This is not a mistake. I know that gallium will not cause any problems on copper, but when direct copper tubs such as this are used to make contact the CPU, there are always little bits of aluminum at risk too. You can see the small lines between the tubes, and on the edges of the pad. It doesn't take much gallium to get in there to cause the bits of aluminum holding the pipes in place to start to break down, and ultimately cause the pipes to shift, or the base to fall apart.

I personally use Liquid Metal Pro in all of my systems, which is the reason I pointed out this detail. Most skip over it and consider it to be acceptable. I don't, however, and only buy coolers that either have a solid copper or nickel-plated base to avoid this issue.
 

alidan

Splendid
Aug 5, 2009
5,303
0
25,780
0


This is not a mistake. I know that gallium will not cause any problems on copper, but when direct copper tubs such as this are used to make contact the CPU, there are always little bits of aluminum at risk too. You can see the small lines between the tubes, and on the edges of the pad. It doesn't take much gallium to get in there to cause the bits of aluminum holding the pipes in place to start to break down, and ultimately cause the pipes to shift, or the base to fall apart.

I personally use Liquid Metal Pro in all of my systems, which is the reason I pointed out this detail. Most skip over it and consider it to be acceptable. I don't, however, and only buy coolers that either have a solid copper or nickel-plated base to avoid this issue.
a good point that is a non issue to almost anyone.

that said cant wait to see someone do benches on this. im putting together parts for my next computer soon and want it to come in under 1500$ if possible, cheaper but fantastic parts are better to be than the best of the best.
 
Bench's would be nice at some point. I don't think the v-groove in the fins is an issue, most of the heat is cooled directly from the heat pipes and just a bit to the fins attached. I highly doubt much heat under constant airflow radiates all the way across all those fins (of any cooler) into the center, the furthest point from the heat pipes. Not only do they likely save money on materials it also keeps the weight down.

It looks like they went to the trouble to shift the heat pipes and mass of the cooler to one side similar to the cryorig h7. Does it have the same 0 ram conflict with intel boards? Not sure how much of an issue it was with amd boards, if their ram was just as subject to interference from coolers like the 212 evo. If I'm not mistaken the same layout was used on the new z170 boards as the lga1155/1150 boards.

Also nice they chose to blackout the top of the cooler, quite a few folks with windowed cases who try to avoid the look of plain metal and black is pretty universal.
 


SilentiumPC provided a photo showing it did not interfere with the RAM on at least one board. However, this varies too much from one motherboard to another. As such, I didn't want to state if it would cause this issue or not, because it won't be accurate in all cases.
 
Just hopped over to their website, had only looked at the article pics. Looks like the offset design does in fact work much like the h7's and has 0 ram interference on the 1155/1150/1151 boards. Also made it more apparent the function the 'v' shape notch in the fins provides, access for a screwdriver to reach the cross member mounting screw. Other coolers have done similar but with a hole punched through the various layered fins. They just opted to use the notch.

Looks like they avoided ram interference on the am3+ as well. Not an over the top styled cooler or anything but so far looks like they did their homework and planned pretty well for a universal cooler. Made it a point to outline all the various sockets in the short youtube vids to show compatibility and the install looks pretty painless. Nice use of the clips to keep the mounting pins from backing out once attached to the backplate. By appearances they seem to cover all the bases. Props for that and appears to have an attractive price.

Depending on cooling bench's and noise profile, might be a head to head competitor to cryorig's budget coolers. If so, good news for folks moving the lga1151 since the new skylake cpu's forego the stock cooler. Too early to tell but it may be a new trend moving forward and amd could follow suit with their zen cpu's also. It'll be good to have some more budget minded options for aftermarket coolers if they begin to go this route and builders are required to pick up a cooler rather than just stay with the stock unit. Enthusiasts will most likely opt for higher performance coolers and won't be bothered by the higher prices but folks aren't going to be too happy if they're stuck with moderate to expensive options as their only cooling choices for new chips.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS