simple question

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Hi all.

What are differences of IP addresses and MAC addresses??

Thanks a lot in advance

Lukasz
 
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Layer 2 - MAC Address, 48 bit unique identifier for a network host
participating in an network. MAC address does not imply the network is
Ethernet.

Layer 3 - IP Address, 32 bit identifier for a host participating in a IP
network.


Beyond that, I would suggest Google.

-mike

Lukasz wrote:
> Hi all.
>
> What are differences of IP addresses and MAC addresses??
>
> Thanks a lot in advance
>
> Lukasz
>
>
 
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Michael Roberts wrote:
> Layer 2 - MAC Address, 48 bit unique identifier for a network host
> participating in an network. MAC address does not imply the network is
> Ethernet.
<snip>

Not always 48 bit. Can be more, can be less.

Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
over ethernet?

Also, arcnet has 8 bit mac addresses. (just one of the many reasons it's
a dead technology)

T. Sean Weintz
 
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"T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
>over ethernet?

Nope. I'm almost afraid to ask, what does MS RAS Server send?
 
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William P.N. Smith wrote:
> "T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>
>>Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
>>over ethernet?
>
>
> Nope. I'm almost afraid to ask, what does MS RAS Server send?
>

A typical one might look something like:

52:41:53:20:90:e4:9d:b9:24:9d:c0:01:01:00:00:00

notice it's 16 bytes instead of the usual 6.

The first four bytes are always 52:41:53:20. Try converting that to
ascii and you will see why they chose those bytes ;-)

This has apparently changes since they released wink. But NT3.5 and 4.0
RAS do use those funny MAC addresses.
 
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"T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>> "T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>>>Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
>>>over ethernet?

>52:41:53:20:90:e4:9d:b9:24:9d:c0:01:01:00:00:00

[Ascii R@S ]

>notice it's 16 bytes instead of the usual 6.

And that doesn't break anything?
 
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On 2004-10-28, T. Sean Weintz <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
> Michael Roberts wrote:
>> Layer 2 - MAC Address, 48 bit unique identifier for a network host
>> participating in an network. MAC address does not imply the network is
>> Ethernet.
><snip>
>
> Not always 48 bit. Can be more, can be less.

802.3 says that 802 defines 16 and 48 bits MAC addresses. (I can't seem
to find the 16-bit definition in 802-2001?) 802.3 specifically excludes
16-bit MAC addresses. In that sense only 48-bit macs are conformant.


> Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
> over ethernet?

The usual micros~1 ``let's break stuff'' attitude. I always filter on
exactly that with my dhcp setup. Then again, I am not forced to run
that kind of stuff, so anything looking like it is clearly rogue.


> Also, arcnet has 8 bit mac addresses. (just one of the many reasons it's
> a dead technology)

It did have some nice ideas, though.


--
j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
 
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In article <1098999718.546624@entelocal.ipberlin.com>,
jpd <read_the_sig@do.not.spam.it> wrote:

> On 2004-10-28, T. Sean Weintz <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
> > Michael Roberts wrote:
> >> Layer 2 - MAC Address, 48 bit unique identifier for a network host
> >> participating in an network. MAC address does not imply the network is
> >> Ethernet.
> ><snip>
> >
> > Not always 48 bit. Can be more, can be less.
>
> 802.3 says that 802 defines 16 and 48 bits MAC addresses. (I can't seem
> to find the 16-bit definition in 802-2001?) 802.3 specifically excludes
> 16-bit MAC addresses. In that sense only 48-bit macs are conformant.
>

Only 48 bit addresses conform to the Ethernet/IEEE 802.3 standard,
however, that is not the only MAC in the world. As other posters noted,
ARCnet used 8 bit MAC addresses as did Apple's LocalTalk (although they
didn't call them "MAC" addresses).


--
Rich Seifert Networks and Communications Consulting
21885 Bear Creek Way
(408) 395-5700 Los Gatos, CA 95033
(408) 228-0803 FAX

Send replies to: usenet at richseifert dot com
 
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On 2004-10-28, William P.N. Smith <> wrote:
> "T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>>> "T. Sean Weintz" <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>>>>Ever seen what MS RAS server sends for mac addresses in DHCP requests
>>>>over ethernet?
>
>>52:41:53:20:90:e4:9d:b9:24:9d:c0:01:01:00:00:00
>
> [Ascii R@S ]

Is that off-by-one-error intentional?


>>notice it's 16 bytes instead of the usual 6.
>
> And that doesn't break anything?

Apart from filling up all of the DHCP pool if you let it? Apparently the
protocol is robust enough to deal with it. Admittedly, I have not dug
into its spec to find out if it's legal or not.


--
j p d (at) d s b (dot) t u d e l f t (dot) n l .
 
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jpd <read_the_sig@do.not.spam.it> wrote:
> On 2004-10-28, T. Sean Weintz <strap@hanh-ct.org> wrote:
>> Michael Roberts wrote:
>>> Layer 2 - MAC Address, 48 bit unique identifier for a network host
>>> participating in an network. MAC address does not imply the network is
>>> Ethernet.
>><snip>
>>
>> Not always 48 bit. Can be more, can be less.

> 802.3 says that 802 defines 16 and 48 bits MAC addresses. (I can't seem
> to find the 16-bit definition in 802-2001?) 802.3 specifically excludes
> 16-bit MAC addresses. In that sense only 48-bit macs are conformant.

16-bit MAC ws allowed in 802.4 ( broadband cable, as used in MAP)




--
Peter Håkanson
IPSec Sverige ( At Gothenburg Riverside )
Sorry about my e-mail address, but i'm trying to keep spam out,
remove "icke-reklam" if you feel for mailing me. Thanx.
 
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Lukasz wrote:

> What are differences of IP addresses and MAC addresses??
>

A mac address is assigned to a network card at the point of manufacture. An
IP address is assigned, when a computer is connected to a network. The mac
address is used for communication over a local network. An IP address is
used when the data has to pass through a router.
 

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