Question single channel speed

robanswe

Commendable
Dec 25, 2018
27
0
1,530
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OP: Asks for PSU advice, with a link to a PCPartPicker list with a 1x8 memory choice

Guy: "Never mind the power supply. Get a second stick of ram in there or get a 2x4gb."

OP: Doesn't think RAM bandwith will be a bottleneck

Guy: "If that's what you want to think. Just don't be suprised when you see your ram running at 1333mhz and not 2666mhz."

OP: "I will be [suprised] if that happen, would be wrong with my bios"

Me: "It will run at 2666 though, no doubt about that."

Guy: "If you have two sticks, sure. That's why it's called Double Data Rate 4(DDR4)."

is "guy" in the right here? im really confused
 

dorsai

Distinguished
The only thing 1 stick vs 2 determines is whether or not the system is running in dual channel or not. Dual channel provides better performance...1 x 8 on a dual channel system is a mistake.

The type of ram you buy and setting the correct motherboard options determine memory speed and data rates.
 
OP: Asks for PSU advice, with a link to a PCPartPicker list with a 1x8 memory choice

Guy: "Never mind the power supply. Get a second stick of ram in there or get a 2x4gb."

OP: Doesn't think RAM bandwith will be a bottleneck

Guy: "If that's what you want to think. Just don't be suprised when you see your ram running at 1333mhz and not 2666mhz."

OP: "I will be [suprised] if that happen, would be wrong with my bios"

Me: "It will run at 2666 though, no doubt about that."

Guy: "If you have two sticks, sure. That's why it's called Double Data Rate 4(DDR4)."

is "guy" in the right here? im really confused
Except for PSU part "Guy" is wrong on many points.RAM uses very little energy. unless PSU is too tight with power but then you+d have much bigger problems.
Also question about "speed", there are only bandwidth and performance, no speed.
Performance can be a factor in bottleneck but varies with SW requirements, not all will be affected equally.
DDR can show both of those frequencies depending on program that reads it, DDR stands for Double Data Rate, that means real throughput is twice the base frequency. So 1333MHz means the throughput is actually 2666MHz commonly and erroneously called "Speed".
The last one is soooooo wrong, I'm left speechless. That "Guy" should be selling shoes.
Performance as per benchmarks is largely due to at least 2 factors, frequency and latency but as I said before, that varies by usage, (OS and programs) and their requirements.
 

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